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Richard Meier's Douglas House Added to National Register of Historic Places

10:20 - 12 July, 2016
Richard Meier's Douglas House Added to National Register of Historic Places, © James Haefner courtesy of Michigan State Historic Preservation Office
© James Haefner courtesy of Michigan State Historic Preservation Office

Today, one of Richard Meier’s most notable and acclaimed residences, the 1973 Douglas House, has been named to the National Register of Historic Places, the federal list of cultural resources worthy of preservation across the United States. The announcement comes after an extensive renovation to the property was completed in 2011, and will grant the home the legal status to help ensure the building is maintained for generations to come.

© James Haefner courtesy of Michigan State Historic Preservation Office © James Haefner courtesy of Michigan State Historic Preservation Office © Scott Frances/OTTO © James Haefner courtesy of Michigan State Historic Preservation Office +19

Restoring a Classic: Richard Meier's Douglas House

13:45 - 2 September, 2011
Courtesy of Dwell
Courtesy of Dwell

Referred to as one of Meier’s best works, the Douglas House hovers over the shores of Lake Michigan placed upon a steep slope over the water almost as if it is floating amongst the trees.   The Douglas House was designed for clients Jim and Jean Douglas and was completed in 1973 after a three year construction period (1971-1973).   Meier furnished the home with furniture designed by Le Corbusier, Mies van der Rohe, and himself, and it needed no ornamentation other than the nature it was designed around.

As is typical of Meier buildings, the house is completely white made with reinforced concrete and glass except for two steel pipes that extend from the chimney up to the roof, framing views at the entry level. Taking the natural surroundings into consideration during the construction, the house was positioned to remove as few trees as possible.

Featured in Dwell’s latest edition (out this week!), the full article can be found following the break.

Courtesy of Dwell Courtesy of Dwell Courtesy of Dwell Courtesy of Dwell +16