19 Great Monuments Destroyed by War

Great Mosque of Samarra, Iraq . Image © Flickr CC User James Gordon

One of the most important Islamic architectural monuments, the Great Mosque of Samarra in Iraq is one of many priceless monuments that has been “lost in conflict.” Paying homage to the architectural masterpieces that have been victims of war, has put together a list of 19 of the world’s “greatest buildings you’ll never see.” View them all, here.

The Woman Architect Who Specialises In Mosques

Dome of the Sakirin Mosque, Istanbul. Image © ZF Design

As part of CNN’s Leading Women series, Sheena McKenzie explores the work of Turkish architect Zeynep Fadillioglu - perhaps the first female architect to design a mosque, now on her third. In buildings where men and women are traditionally separated for worship, and women are often given a smaller space, Fadillioglu “purposely placed the women’s section in one of the most beautiful parts of the light-flooded dome” in Istanbul’s Sakirin Mosque. McKenzie concludes that although “Fadillioglu might have made a name for herself designing mosques, you don’t needn’t be religious to admire their beauty.”

A mosque isn’t for a certain type of person, or certain type of area. It’s supposed to be used by anyone and everyone.

Sakirin Mosque, Istanbul. Image © ZF Design
Place of worship, Sakirin Mosque, Istanbul. Image © ZF Design

Read the article in full here.

A Biennale of “Bold Reminders”

YouTube Preview Image

For ’s George Webster, this year’s Biennale is a “bold reminder that architecture is – or at least should be – about a great deal more than blueprints, digital renderings and scale models.” Taking the British Pavilion as a case in point, Webster argues that Koolhaas’ original thematic provocation has paid off, succeeding “because it places people - our history, culture and even our bodies - at the very heart of its thinking.” Travelling through the pavilions of Romania, Germany, the Dominican Republic, and Russia, you can read the article in full here.

Video: Bjarke Ingels Exposes His Roots

As we have shared with you earlier, ’s The Next List has profiled the young, Danish architect Bjarke Ingels. Originally aspired to be a cartoonist or graphic novelist, Ingels quickly became fascinated with architecture when a Fall storm rolled through his hometown in North Copenhagen, knocking over trees and leaving him a surplus of lumber. It was then that he was inspired to design his first project, the ultimate childhood “fantasy fort” with a moat, drawbridge and all.  In Ingels first experience with value engineering, he quickly learned that “unless you really begin with the perimeters of reality you’ll end up sort of amputating your ambitions quite quickly.” Enjoy the video and be sure to check out CNN’s recent video focusing on the bold ideas behind BIG.

Additionally, Ingels contributed an essay entitled Rethinking social infrastructure” on CNN’s What’s Next blog. You can check it out here.

Reference: CNN, Archinect

Video: Bjarke Ingels featured as a CNN “Next Lister”

Dr. Sanjay Gupta of ’s “The Next List” features the bold and innovative ideas of Bjarke Ingels, focusing on the West 57th project that is transforming Manhattan skyline. Ingels states, “In the big picture, architecture is the art and science of making sure that our cities and buildings fit the way we want to live our lives.” The video also features comments from Robert A. M. Stern, Dean at Yale School of Architecture, and Douglas Durst, the developer of West 57th. Check it out!

Reference: CNN

Video: 30 square meter house in Japan

Do you think you could live in a house no bigger than a parking space? And not just by yourself, do you think you could live there with your mother? Apparently, Fuyuhito Moriya can. Check the video from CNN and tell us what you think.