Danish National Maritime Museum / BIG

© Rasmus Hjortshøj

Architects: BIG
Location: Helsingor,
Architect In Charge: Bjarke Ingels, David Zahle
Project Leader : David Zahle
Area: 17,500 sqm
Year: 2013
Photographs: Rasmus Hjortshøj, Thijs Wolzak, Luca Santiago Mora

BIG Selected to Design Mixed-Use Complex in San Francisco

Section Model. Image ©

In an effort to reestablish Mid-Market as an arts district in San Francisco, developer Joy Ou has commissioned BIG to design a mixed-use arts, and hotel complex on 950 Market St. As the San Francisco Business Times reports, Group I is collaborating with the Thacher family and the nonprofit 950 Center for Art & Education to develop the project, which could potentially include a 250-room hotel, 316 residential units, a 75,000-square-foot arts complex, and 15,000 square feet of retail. The project will be BIG’s first in the Bay Area.

Round-Up: The Towers of BIG

Courtesy of BIG. ImageVancouver Tower

Today’s been shaping up to be quite the day for . Not only does the BIG founder turn 39 today, but he was just announced as a finalist for the second annual FT/Citi Ingenuity Awards for his work on the award-winning urban park Superkilen. For more Bjarke to brighten up your day, we’ve decided to round-up the soaring, twisting and turning towers that BIG has waiting in store for us: from a precariously spiraling observation tower planned for downtown Phoenix, Arizona; to the two high-rise residential towers BIG has in the works for – the seemingly “ruptured” Marina Lofts and the twisting twins of The Grove at Grand Bay; to the headlines-making, mixed-use towers planned for Vancouver and Calgary. Enjoy!

BIG Designs Pier 6 Viewing Platform for Brooklyn’s Waterfront

Courtesy of BIG

Following the news that Studio V Architecture has been commissioned to convert the 19th century Empire Stores, next to Bridge, into 380,000 square-feet of office, restaurant and commercial space,  Group (BIG) has unveiled designs for “a flowering meadow with seasonal grasses, a sprawling field and a triangular wooden viewing platform” close by.

Nyt Hospital Nordsjælland Shortlisted Proposal / BIG

© BIG

As we announced last week, BIG++ has been selected as one of three design teams to participate in the second phase of the design competition for Nyt Hospital Nordsjælland, a 124,000 square meter acute hospital in Hillerød, north of Copenhagen. BIG’s proposal for the new hospital, serving over 300,000 people, seeks to “preserve the site’s existing natural features while optimizing the efficient hospital machine.”

Read on for more from the architect’s description…

BIG Shortlisted In Competition to Design Denmark’s Largest Hospital

© BIG

UPDATE: All three shortlisted teams have been announced. Check out there proposals here

BIG, WHR and Arup have been shortlisted alongside two other design teams to participate in the second phase of the design competition for what will be Denmark’s largest hospital. The 124,000 square meter facility, known as the Nyt Hospital Nordsjælland, is planned to be built north of .

According to the jury, “BIG’s ideas, together with the large green spaces and green surfaces, mean that we really can talk about a healing hospital in the best possible interpretation of the concept.”

We will keep you updated as details of the other shortlisted teams emerge.

Gammel Hellerup Gymnasium / BIG

© Jens Lindhe

Architects: BIG
Location: 2900 , Denmark
Creative Director: Bjarke Ingels
Partner In Charge: Finn Nørkjær
Project Leader: Ole Schrøder (Concept), Ole Elkjær (Construction)
Project Architect: Frederik Lyng
Project Team: Narisara Ladawal Schröder, Henrick Poulsen, Dennis Rasmussen, Jeppe Ecklon, Rune Hansen, Riccardo Mariano, Christian Alvare Gomez, Xu Li, Jakob Lange, Thomas Juul-Jensen
Area: 1100.0 sqm
Year: 2013
Photographs: Jens Lindhe

OMA Wins Miami Beach Convention Center

Courtesy of

After months of competition, debate, and quite a fair share of controversy (from the Miami politiicans that is), OMA and South Beach ACE have beaten BIG to win the masterplan.

Despite the last-ditch efforts of the Miami politicians to keep the drama going (including a presentation on the supposed superiority of the BIG plan, due to time-sensitivity and cost-efficiency) and even the surprising revelation that negotiations with the teams had been taped (we assume to monitor corruption, as accusations of back-handed deals have haunted the vote), the Miami Commissioners approved the South Beach ACE team over the Portman-CMC team (with BIG) in a five to two vote.

The 52 acre mixed-used development will not only include an iconic new convention center and hotel, but will revitalize this underutilized area of Miami Beach with a network of undulating, green spaces that integrate into Miami’s urban fabric. As OMA Partner-in-charge of the project, Shohei Shigematsu, and Rem Koolhaas said in a statement: “We are thrilled to be chosen to develop one of the most significant urban districts in the US. Our design will reintegrate Miami’s vital convention center with its neighbors, offering new facilities as well as amplifying the character of this exciting city.”

Last month we interviewed Shohei Shigematsu about the Miami Project. Check out that interview, as well as a short video of the proposal itself, after the break…

BIG Unveils ‘Telus Sky’ Tower in Calgary

Courtesy of

In an attempt to transform ’s corporate-centric downtown into a walkable, dynamic community, TELUS has commissioned BIG to design a mixed-use skyscraper in the heart of the Canadian city. Known as TELUS Sky, the 750,000 square foot tower is designed to “seamlessly accommodate the transformation from working to living as the tower takes off from the ground to reach the sky.”

Fate Uncertain for Miami Beach Convention Center

Courtesy of (above), BIG (below)

OMA, BIG and their partnering developers have until later today to decide whether they want to alter their plans for the Convention Center or walk away from the competition entirely.

The city was supposed to choose between OMA’s or BIG’s proposals, which have been in the pipeline for months, in the next few weeks. However, according to the World Property Channel, the city has now – in a disappointing turn of events – decided that the $1.1 billion project should be radically downsized by removing the residential units and cutting down retail space.

It’s a reversal that will, in the words of Kevin Brass in his must-read opinion piece, remove ”the opportunity for creativity and vision. Taking out the ambition won’t make it a better project, only a smaller project. Miami Beach is providing a textbook example of how not to create a great urban space.”

Story via World Property Channel

The Prince: Bjarke Ingels’s Social Conspiracy

© DAC / Jakob Galtt

A version of this essay was originally published in Thresholds 40: “Socio-” (2012)

Few architects working today attract as much public acclaim and disciplinary head-scratching as . Having recently arrived in New York, this self-proclaimed futurist is undertaking his own form of Manifest Destiny, reminding American architects how to act in their own country.

While his practice is often branded by the architectural establishment as naïve and opportunistic, such criticism is too quick to conflate Ingels’s outwardly optimistic persona with the brash formal agenda it enables. In the current economic climate, there are any number of gifted purveyors of form languishing in New York City. Despite this, Ingels has somehow managed to get away with proposing a pyramidal perimeter block in midtown New York, a looped pier in St. Petersburg Florida, and an art center in Park City, Utah massed as torqued log cabin while maintaining a straight face. Why, then, is his mode of operation considered unsophisticated by so many within the discipline?

Clearly, Ingels has figured something out about harnessing and transforming “the social” that American architects would do well to identify. So, in the manner of any good conspiracy theorist in search for the hidden method, let’s go to the chalkboard, or rather, the diagram…

AD Interviews OMA, BIG on their Miami Showdown

Over the last few months, OMA and BIG have been vying for the opportunity to redevelop the 52-acre site home to the convention center in the heart of Beach. With two award-winning, international firms at the center of the showdown, the media frenzy has been intense and the public’s imagination activated. It only remains to be seen if the results, which promise to be visionary, surpass expectation. With so much on the line, we decided to sit down with both OMA and BIG and discuss how their proposals differ.

For extended coverage of both projects see “BIG Unveils Design for Miami Beach Convention Center” and “OMA Proposes Radical Redevelopment Plan for the Miami Beach Convention Center

The BIG LEGO® House Reveal

The LEGO® House / ; Courtesy of The LEGO® Group

The design for BIG’s highly anticipated LEGO® “experience center” – a.k.a. The LEGO® House – has been released! Located in the heart of The Lego Group’s birthplace and home town of , Denmark, the 7,600 square-meter building resembles “gigantic LEGO® bricks” that are “combined and stacked in a creative way to create an imaginative experience both outside and inside.”

True to form, the 30 meter-tall structure will feature several exterior and multi-level access points that will remain open year-long to its estimated 250,000 annual visitors. Aside from its roof-top gardens and 1,900 square-meter public square, attractions will include a series of exhibition areas showcasing the “past, present and future of the LEGO® idea”, a cafe and an unique LEGO® store.

Take a video tour through the building after the break…

Who Should Win the OMA vs. BIG Miami Showdown?

© BIG

The Convention Center, a giant box of a building constructed in 1957, is in desperate need of a makeover and two design teams have bravely accepted the challenge. Team 1 is dubbed South Beach ACE (Arts, Culture, Entertainment District) and is a collaboration between Rem Koolhaas‘s OMA firm, Tishman, UIA, MVVA, Raymond Jungles and TVS. Team 2 goes by the name of Miami Beach Square and includes BIG, West 8, Fentress, JPA and Portman CMC. Both proposals completely re-imagine 52 acres of prime beach real estate and cost over a billion dollars in public and private funds. So, who does it better? 

Vote for your favorite after the break…

The City of Fort Lauderdale Votes in Favor of BIG’s Marina Lofts

Courtesy of BIG

On Tuesday, a sea of green and blue flooded the City Commission chamber to either support or oppose a BIG, $250 million multi-use development planned to infill an industrial gap on the waterfront of Downtown . Although the majority of the crowd seemed to be in favor of the “impressive, innovative and even daring” project, concerns arose regarding the Marina Lofts’ density, height and traffic impact – many of which were appeased by developer Asi Cymbal’s decision to reduce the two 36-story towers to 28, which cut nearly 100 units from the project.

Other last ditch opposition efforts regarded the controversial plan to move a giant rain tree that wasn’t within the purview of the board’s review. Despite this, following an hour-long presentation by Cymbal and his staff, the Planning  & Zoning board unanimously voted 9-0 in favor of the project.

More after the break…

BIG Unveils Design for Miami Beach Convention Center

©

BIG has collaborated with West 8, Fentress, JPA and developers Portman CMC to challenge an OMA- and South Beach ACE-lead team in the 52-acre Miami Beach Convention Center overhaul. With a mission to “bring Miami Beach back to the Convention Center,” BIG’s newly unveiled proposal aims to transform the “dead black hole of asphalt in the heart of one of the most beautiful and lively cities in America” into an archipelago of urban oases made up of paths, plazas, parks and gardens, which will all lead to the heart of the plan: the Miami Beach Square. This tropical centerpiece will become the front door to the convention center and the convention hotel, as well as the front lawn to a revitalized Jackie Gleason Theatre, a town square for the city hall, an outdoor arena for the Latin American Cultural Museum, and the red carpet for the big botanical ball room.

“We have devised a strategy that combines urban planning and landscape design to create a neighborhood characterized by human scale, pedestrian connections, shaded spaces with public oriented programs lining the streets and squares. A neighborhood that, depending on the season, the weekday, or even the time of day can be perceived as a lively downtown neighborhood or an inviting public park.” , Creative Director BIG

More images and the teams description after the break…

A Crash Course on Modern Architecture (Part 2)

High Line, New York, is a good example of what is to come. Image © Iwan Baan

Merete Ahnfeldt-Mollerup is associate Professor at The Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts. This article originally appeared in GRASP.

Miss Part 1? Find it here.

Architecture is inseparable from planning, and the huge challenge for the current generation is the growth and shrinkage of cities. Some cities, mainly in the Southern Hemisphere, are growing at exponential rates, while former global hubs in the northern are turning into countrysides. In the south, populations are still growing a lot, while populations are dwindling in Europe, Russia and North East Asia. The dream of the Bilbao effect was based on the hope that there might be a quick fix to both of these problems. Well, there is not.

A decade ago, few people even recognized this was a real issue and even today it is hardly ever mentioned in a political context. As a politician, you cannot say out loud that you have given up on a huge part of the electorate, or that it makes sense for the national economy to favor another part. Reclaiming the agricultural part of a nation is a political suicide issue whether you are in Europe or Latin America. And investing in urban development in a few, hand-picked areas while other areas are desolate is equally despised.

The one person, who is consistently thinking and writing about this problem, is Rem Koolhaas, a co-founder of OMA.

Yes Is More: The BIG Philosophy

Yes is more: an archicomic on architectural evolution – presents his extraordinary architecture in cartoon-form

Anders Møller is the co-founder of GRASP Magazine, where this article was originally published.

What has the internationally awarded (BIG) to do with Friederich Nietzsche and Charles Darwin? Quite a lot, according to founder Bjarke Ingels, who has created a powerful mixture of Nietzsche and Darwin as the philosophical foundation of BIG’s architecture.

Read Anders Møller’s fascinating article on BIG’s unusual philosophy, after the break…