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Iberê Camargo Foundation: Standards and Variations

© Fernando Guerra | FG+SG
© Fernando Guerra | FG+SG

It could have been a rectangular prism whose length measures forty-one meters and a half, whose width measures thirty-three meters, and whose height measures twenty-five meters. It could have been, if the projection had ended in the trace of a pure rule. It could have been almost the same: three elevated plans, each formed by three rectangular exhibitions rooms, placed at two consecutive faces and connected by ramps that run on the two other faces. Then, a four-story-high atrium rises between circulations and rooms, creating a diagonal symmetry inside the building.

Álvaro Siza wins Golden Lion for Lifetime Achievement

Alvaro Siza Vieira, Golden Lion for Lifetime Achievement of the 13th International Architecture Exhibition – la Biennale di Venezia. Courtesy: Álvaro Siza office
Alvaro Siza Vieira, Golden Lion for Lifetime Achievement of the 13th International Architecture Exhibition – la Biennale di Venezia. Courtesy: Álvaro Siza office

Álvaro Siza Vieira’s birthday week just got even better, as he has been awarded the Golden Lion for Lifetime Achievement of the 13th International Architecture Exhibition. The decision was made by the Board of la Biennale di Venezia, chaired by Paolo Baratta, under Director David Chipperfield’s proposal. Siza will be honored at the Giardini of la Biennale, during the opening and award ceremony on August 29th, 2012. “It is difficult to think of a contemporary architect who has maintained such a consistent presence within the profession as Álvaro Siza. That this presence is maintained by an architect that lives and works at the extreme Atlantic margin of Europe only serves to emphasize his authority and his status.” Continue after the break to read more.

Architecture City Guide: Berlin

Courtesy of Flickr CC License / alexthompson
Courtesy of Flickr CC License / alexthompson

This week, with the help of our readers, our Architecture City Guide is headed to Berlin. The twentieth century changed nearly all cities, but perhaps none more so than Berlin. From its destruction in World War II that left few historic buildings intact to its division until 1989 that brought together the architecture of two competing ideologies into one city, Berlin’s modern and contemporary architecture speaks to a past that seldom accompanies such recent additions. The city is filled with new and wonderful architecture that might not have found space in other cities in Europe. With that in mind, we were unable feature all our readers’ suggestions on the first go around. We will be adding to the list in the near future, so please add more of your favorites in the comment section below. Once again, thanks to all our readers for your help. The Architecture City Guide: Berlin list and corresponding map after the break.