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Adobe's Monument Mode Helps You Remove "Annoying Tourists" From Your Architecture Photos

Here's a story you might recognize: you save up and book a week's holiday for a long-anticipated pilgrimage to your favorite architectural landmark. Finally the day arrives and you take your best camera, with an empty memory card, to make sure that nothing prevents you from getting that one shot - that perfect shot - which you will treasure forever. But when you arrive, that perfect shot is blocked by hundreds of oblivious tourists, wandering around, pointing, or perhaps even doing their best Power Rangers impersonation. You're left with two options: either abandon your souvenir, or spend hours Photoshopping intruders out of your photo.

Soon though, this kind of inconvenience could be a thing of the past. As reported by The Verge, at their MAX conference hosted last night, Adobe demonstrated an experimental project for smartphones known as "Monument Mode" that can remove tourists from a photograph in a few minutes on site, rather than a few hours back home.

22 Websites You Didn't Know Were Useful to Architects

Being an architect is hard. At times, you're expected to act as everything from a graphic designer to a handyman (or woman), from a data scientist to a writer, or from a computer programmer to a public speaker. And, you're expected to do all these things on little to no sleep and for a much lower wage than you're probably worth. But don't fear - the internet is here to help (it's not just a place to procrastinate, you know).

We've collected 22 free websites that can help you in the never ending quests for efficiency, knowledge and good taste. Whether you're selecting the perfect color scheme for a presentation or graph, tracking the price of your next big purchase, solving technical problems or simply trying to balance your sleep and caffeine intake, there's something in this list to help everyone. 

Moleskine And Adobe Creative Cloud Join Forces To Smooth Workflows

As part of their quest to synchronise our digital and analogue worlds, sketchbook designer Moleskine have joined forces with the Adobe Creative Cloud platform to "simplify workflows" for illustrators, designers and architects. Suggesting that the initial stages of the creative process often occur offline, out of the studio or in transit, the team behind the collaboration note that as a portable, uncomplicated object, the Moleskine notebook "can be used anytime, anywhere and especially on the move. Sketching on paper is immediate, and can even be done on a crowded train."

Now users with a Creative Cloud subscription, combined with a special Moleskine sketchbook, can capture images of their drawings with the associated app (iOS only). These are then converted into smooth vector files which are automatically synchronised to desktop programs such as Photoshop (as a .jpeg) or Illustrator (as a .svg).

Adobe Photoshop Becomes a Tool for 3D Printing

Adobe has unveiled a major update to Photoshop CC (Creative Cloud) with the hope that a "radically simplified 3D printing process" will make their software the "go-to tool for anyone who wants to print a 3D model." Their new software allows for designers to create a model from scratch or refine an existing design leading to perfect print ready 3D models. Since one of the most common problems with 3D printing is the human errors in virtual modeling, Photoshop includes automatic mesh repair and will insert a support structure if necessary to ensure that the model will print reliably and without faults.