Iwan Baan

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Interview: Elizabeth Diller on the Design of The Broad in Los Angeles

12:39 - 24 September, 2015

The Broad has officially opened its doors in downtown Los Angeles. Taking four years to complete, the highly anticipated, 120,000-square-foot building houses a prominent collection of postwar and international contemporary art owned by billionaire philanthropists Eli and Edythe Broad. During the press preview, VernissageTV caught up with the building's architect, Elizabeth Diller of Diller, Scofidio + Renfro, to gain a better understanding of The Broad's “veil over the vault" concept. 

Critical Round-Up: Diller Scofidio + Renfro's Broad Museum

09:30 - 24 September, 2015
Critical Round-Up: Diller Scofidio + Renfro's Broad Museum, © Iwan Baan
© Iwan Baan

After teasing the general public by offering the press and 3,000 lucky local citizens with a preview day six months ago, the Broad Museum has finally opened its doors. Designed by Highline architects Diller, Scofidio + Renfro, the museum took four years and $140 million to build, adding its presence to LA’s architectural Broadway, Grand Avenue. With its visually striking facade given the tough task of responding to its enigmatic neighbor, Frank Gehry’s perennially polarizing Walt Disney Concert Hall, the building was sure to attract the attention of the critics, and they rose to the challenge in their droves. Read on to find out what five critics thought of the building dubbed “the veil over the vault.”

© Jeff Duran - Warren Air © Iwan Baan © Iwan Baan © Iwan Baan +6

RIBA Awards 2016 Royal Gold Medal to Zaha Hadid

05:20 - 24 September, 2015
RIBA Awards 2016 Royal Gold Medal to Zaha Hadid, Zaha Hadid, recipient of the 2016 RIBA Gold Medal. Image © Mary McCartney
Zaha Hadid, recipient of the 2016 RIBA Gold Medal. Image © Mary McCartney

The Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA) have revealed that Dame Zaha Hadid will receive the 2016 Royal Gold Medal — the first sole woman to be awarded the UK's highest honour for architects in her own right. Previous female winners (Sheila O’Donnell in 2015, Patty Hopkins in 1994, and Ray Eames in 1979) were each recognised alongside their husbands and practice partners.

Given in recognition of a lifetime’s work, the RIBA Royal Gold Medal is approved personally by Her Majesty The Queen and is awarded to those who have had a significant influence "either directly or indirectly on the advancement of architecture." Other notable Royal Gold Medallists include Frank Gehry (2000), Lord Norman Foster, Baron of Thames Bank (1983), Ludwig Mies van der Rohe (1959), Le Corbusier (1953), and Frank Lloyd Wright (1941). The medallists' names are engraved into the marble wall at the RIBA's headquarters in London.

5 Top Firms Respond: What Do You Look for in Job Applications?

09:30 - 14 September, 2015
5 Top Firms Respond: What Do You Look for in Job Applications?

Often, all that is needed for that big break in your career is getting experience at the right firm. But getting your foot in the door is daunting, especially if your ideal firm is one where thousands of other architects are applying constantly, regardless of whether a vacancy has been advertised. In this article originally posted on The Architect's Guide, Brandon Hubbard reaches out to some of the world's top architecture firms (Zaha Hadid Architects, Snøhetta, Perkins+Will, BDP and Callison) to find out how you can maximize your chances in the application process.

I recently reached out to several of the world’s top architecture firms and asked them a series of questions on what they look for in potential architecture job applicants.

After my discussions with these firms I discovered a common theme in how they acquire many new hires. As I covered in a previous article, Want a Great Architecture Job? Don't Send a Resume, many new employees are found through personal references and word of mouth.  Developing these relationships within the architecture community is essential for a successful career.

The questions are structured to cover the various steps of the architecture job application process, from the first point of contact to the interview.

Why Ecosystem Services Will be the Next Frontier in Livable Cities

09:30 - 12 September, 2015
Land Sparing of Tokyo's Yoyogi Park. Image Courtesy of Flickr CC user spektrograf
Land Sparing of Tokyo's Yoyogi Park. Image Courtesy of Flickr CC user spektrograf

While the term “ecosystem services” may sound like a corporate antithesis to the course of natural order, it is actually an umbrella term for the ways in which the human experience is favorably altered and enhanced by the environment. Ecosystem services are therefore an important factor in creating cities which provide the maximum benefit to their residents with the minimal harm to their environment.

Aiming to find out how city planning can affect the provision of these ecosystem services, a new study published in Frontiers in Ecology and Environment by researchers at the University of Exeter's Environment and Sustainability Institute and Hokkaido University's Division of Environmental Resources evaluates the repercussions of rapid and fragmented urbanization and the possible detriment to ecosystem services and human well-being. In particular, the study is concerned with approaches to land-use and the outcomes they yield on the environment. Studied are two opposing tactics: a “land-sharing,” sprawl model (think Atlanta or Houston), or “land-sparing,” tight-knit urbanism (think New York or Tokyo).

Bjarke Ingels Talks Tech, Entrepreneurship and Modernism in this Podcast with Prehype

08:00 - 10 September, 2015
Bjarke Ingels Talks Tech, Entrepreneurship and Modernism in this Podcast with Prehype, The Danish Pavilion at the Shanghai Expo 2010, exemplary of Bjarke Ingels' entrepreneurial approach to architecture. Image © Iwan Baan
The Danish Pavilion at the Shanghai Expo 2010, exemplary of Bjarke Ingels' entrepreneurial approach to architecture. Image © Iwan Baan

Prehype, a venture development firm, has released its latest in a series of podcasts by partner Henrik Werdelin, featuring Danish architect Bjarke Ingels. Having worked with Prehype on investments into tech development, Bjarke Ingels discusses his experiences and perspectives on the industry, drawing parallels between entrepreneurship, tech development and architecture.

Preview DS+R’s New Stanford Art & Art History Building with Images by Iwan Baan

08:00 - 9 September, 2015
Preview DS+R’s New Stanford Art & Art History Building with Images by Iwan Baan, © Iwan Baan
© Iwan Baan

Diller Scofidio + Renfro (DS+R) has shared initial photos by Iwan Baan of their new McMurty Building for Art & Art History at Stanford University, which will be officially unveiled to the public on October 6. The 100,000 square foot building will open for the 2015 fall semester, and allow students studying art history and students practicing fine arts to work together under the same roof for the first time at Stanford. See and read more about the soon-to-be opened project after the break.

Carnal Hall at Le Rosey / Bernard Tschumi Architects

03:00 - 9 September, 2015
Carnal Hall at Le Rosey / Bernard Tschumi Architects, © Iwan Baan
© Iwan Baan

© Iwan Baan © Iwan Baan © Iwan Baan © Iwan Baan +27

The Broad Museum / Diller Scofidio + Renfro

11:00 - 31 August, 2015
The Broad Museum / Diller Scofidio + Renfro, © Iwan Baan
© Iwan Baan

© Jeff Duran - Warren Air © Iwan Baan © Iwan Baan © Iwan Baan +20

Brad Pitt: "I Get This Well of Pride" Over Make It Right's New Orleans Work

14:00 - 22 August, 2015
The Float House / Morphosis, Make It Right. Image © Iwan Baan
The Float House / Morphosis, Make It Right. Image © Iwan Baan

Ten years ago this month, Hurricane Katrina swept through the Gulf coast of the US, hitting New Orleans the hardest. Two years after the wake of this destruction, after seeing the city's lack of rebuilding progress firsthand, Hollywood star and architecture enthusiast Brad Pitt launched Make It Right, a project set to build 150 houses designed by 20 internationally renowned architects.

Over the past eight years, Make It Right has not only helped to rebuild the Lower Ninth Ward in New Orleans—the area struck the hardest by the disaster—but has also began to spread its work to Missouri, Montana, and New Jersey, with more projects coming soon. While the non-profit organization has had success in its endeavors, it has simultaneously faced a great deal of criticism.

In a recent interview with NOLA, Pitt discusses some of these criticisms, reflecting on the growth of the organization, and the changes it has made. Find out about Pitt’s evolving perspective, after the break.

Frank Gehry-designed duplex. Image © Chad Chenier Photography / Make It Right Duplex house. Image Courtesy of Atelier Hitoshi Abe Lower Ninth Ward, New Orleans. Image © Irina Vinnitskaya Flow House. Image Courtesy of William McDonough + Partners +7

Excerpt: Conversations with Architects in the Age of Celebrity

08:30 - 18 August, 2015
CCTV Headquarters in Beijing by OMA. Image © OMA / Philippe Ruault
CCTV Headquarters in Beijing by OMA. Image © OMA / Philippe Ruault

No matter what you think of it, these days there is no denying that a celebrity culture has a significant effect on the architecture world, with a small percentage of architects taking a large portion of the spotlight. Questioning this status quo, Vladimir Belogolovsky's new book "Conversations with Architects in the Age of Celebrity" interrogates some of these famous architects to find out what they think of the culture which has elevated them to such heights. In this excerpt from the book's foreword, Belogolovsky asks how we got into this celebrity-loving architectural culture, and what it means for the buildings produced.

Not to be confused with other kinds of stars, the most popular of architects are identified as “starchitects.”* Is this a good thing? The notion of starchitecture is hated wholeheartedly by most of the leading architectural critics. They run away from addressing the issue because they think it has nothing to do with professional criticism. But what do the architects think? One of the architectural megastars, Rem Koolhaas, was astonishingly self-effacing in an interview for Hanno Rauterberg’s 2008 book Talking Architecture:

“I think what we are experiencing is the global triumph of eccentricity. Lots of extravagant buildings are being built, buildings that have no meaning, no functionality. It’s rather about spectacular shapes and, of course, the architects’ egos.”

Inaugural Chicago Architecture Biennial Reveals Official List of 2015 Participants

16:23 - 14 August, 2015
Inaugural Chicago Architecture Biennial Reveals Official List of 2015 Participants, Chicago Biennial to feature photo series by Iwan Baan. Image ©  Iwan Baan
Chicago Biennial to feature photo series by Iwan Baan. Image © Iwan Baan

A 40-strong list of international studios has named the official participants of the first-ever Chicago Architecture Biennial - the “largest international survey of contemporary architecture in North America.” Chosen by Biennial Co-Artistic Directors Joseph Grima and Sarah Herda - who are supported by an advisory council comprising David Adjaye, Elizabeth Diller, Jeanne Gang, Frank Gehry, Sylvia Lavin, Hans Ulrich Obrist, Peter Palumbo, and Stanley Tigerman - each participating practice will convene in Chicago to discuss "The State of the Art of Architecture" and showcase their work from October 3 to January 3, 2016.

“The city of Chicago has left an indelible mark on the field of architecture, from the world’s first modern skyscraper to revolutionary urban designs,” said Mayor Rahm Emanuel. “That’s why there’s no better host city than Chicago for this rare global event. The Chicago Architecture Biennial offers an unprecedented chance to celebrate the architectural, cultural, and design advancements that have collectively shaped our world.”

A complete list of participants, after the break. 

Spotlight: Joshua Prince-Ramus

16:30 - 11 August, 2015
Spotlight: Joshua Prince-Ramus, Vakko Headquarters and Power Media Center. Image © Iwan Baan
Vakko Headquarters and Power Media Center. Image © Iwan Baan

Joshua Prince-Ramus (born 11th August, 1969) has made a significant mark as one of the most promising young architects working today. Named one of the five greatest architects under 50 in 2011 by The Huffington Post, Prince-Ramus made a name for himself as one of Rem Koolhaas' many protégés before forming his practice, REX, in 2006.

"Baby Rems" and the Small World of Architecture Internships

09:30 - 9 July, 2015
"Baby Rems" and the Small World of Architecture Internships, Bjarke Ingels worked on the Seattle Central Library during his time at OMA. Image Courtesy OMA
Bjarke Ingels worked on the Seattle Central Library during his time at OMA. Image Courtesy OMA

The world of architecture is small. So small in fact, that Rem Koolhaas has been credited with the creation of over forty practices worldwide, led by the likes of Zaha Hadid and Bjarke Ingels. Dubbed “Baby Rems” by Metropolis Magazine, this Koolhaas effect is hardly an isolated pattern, with manifestations far beyond the walls of OMA. The phenomenon has dominated the world of architecture, assisted by the prevalence and increasing necessity of internships for burgeoning architects.

In a recent article for Curbed, Patrick Sisson dug into the storied history of internships to uncover some unexpected connections between the world's most prolific architects. With the help of Sisson's list, we've compiled a record of the humble beginnings of the household names of architecture. Where did Frank Gehry get his start? Find out after the break.

Renzo Piano's pavilion at Louis Kahn's Kimbell Art Museum. Image © Robert Laprelle Jeanne Gang worked on OMA's Maison Bordeaux. Image © Hans Werlemann, courtesy OMA Mies van der Rohe worked on Behren's AEG Turbine Factory. Image © Flickr CC user Joseph The Guaranty Building in Buffalo, New York by Louis Sullivan. Image Courtesy of Jack E. Boucher +8

Second Home London Office / Selgascano

11:00 - 6 July, 2015
Second Home London Office / Selgascano, © Iwan Baan
© Iwan Baan
  • Architects

  • Location

    68-80 Hanbury Street, London E1 5JL, UK
  • Partners

    José Selgas, Lucia Cano
  • Project Area

    2400.0 m2
  • Project Year

    2014
  • Photographs

© Iwan Baan © Iwan Baan © Iwan Baan © Iwan Baan +16

Iwan Baan's Images of Selgas Cano's 2015 Serpentine Pavilion

11:25 - 22 June, 2015
Iwan Baan's Images of Selgas Cano's 2015 Serpentine Pavilion, Serpentine Pavilion designed by selgascano 2015. Image © Iwan Baan
Serpentine Pavilion designed by selgascano 2015. Image © Iwan Baan

With the opening ceremony of SelgasCano's Serpentine Gallery pavilion earlier today, the Serpentine Gallery has released a set of images by Iwan Baan, capturing the riotous color explosion delivered by the pavilion's ETFE wrapping. Always one of London's most popular architectural attractions over the summer, this year marks the pavilion's 15th anniversary, and will be on display until October 18th.

Read on after the break for more images - and stay tuned to this posts for updates throughout the day!

Serpentine Pavilion designed by selgascano 2015. Image © Iwan Baan Serpentine Pavilion designed by selgascano 2015. Image © Iwan Baan Serpentine Pavilion designed by selgascano 2015. Image © Iwan Baan Serpentine Pavilion designed by selgascano 2015. Image © Iwan Baan +11

From Tokyo to Milwaukee: Sou Fujimoto and His Impact on Students at the University of Wisconsin

09:30 - 4 June, 2015
From Tokyo to Milwaukee: Sou Fujimoto and His Impact on Students at the University of Wisconsin, 2013 Serpentine Gallery Pavilion / Sou Fujimoto. Image © Iwan Baan
2013 Serpentine Gallery Pavilion / Sou Fujimoto. Image © Iwan Baan

With the award of the $100,000 Marcus Prize to Sou Fujimoto in 2013, graduate students at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee’s School of Architecture were offered the rare opportunity to learn from one of Japan's most respected architectural practitioners. Through a semester-long connection to the studio - which he led alongside University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Associate Professor Mo Zell - Fujimoto and his students have realized a small architectural installation on an unused lot in Milwaukee's East side entitled faBRICK.

In this interview conducted in Tokyo last year, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee student Robert Guertin speaks with Fujimoto about the ideas and themes of his work. In an attempt to shed light on the influence he had in the design of faBRICK, his answers are presented alongside images of the resulting installation.

Construction of the University of Wisconsin Milwaukee's faBRICK Pavilion. Image © Courtesy of University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee School of Architecture Construction of the University of Wisconsin Milwaukee's faBRICK Pavilion. Image © Courtesy of University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee School of Architecture The University of Wisconsin Milwaukee's faBRICK Pavilion. Image © Courtesy of University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee School of Architecture Assembly method of the University of Wisconsin Milwaukee's faBRICK Pavilion. Image © Courtesy of University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee School of Architecture +15

Material Masters: The Traditional Tiles of Wang Shu & Lu Wenyu

10:30 - 3 June, 2015
Material Masters: The Traditional Tiles of Wang Shu & Lu Wenyu, via www.ilgiornaledellarchitettura.com (image of Wang Shu and Lu Wenyu) and © Iwan Baan (image of Ningbo Historic Museum)
via www.ilgiornaledellarchitettura.com (image of Wang Shu and Lu Wenyu) and © Iwan Baan (image of Ningbo Historic Museum)

Wang Shu and Lu Wenyu of Amateur Architecture Studio are known for their distinctly contextual attitudes towards design which prize tradition and timelessness above anything else. In many cases, their use of materials is governed by local availability of salvaged building elements. Tiles, in particular, represent a material used repeatedly by Amateur Architecture studio and for Wang Shu, who won the 2012 Pritzker Prize, they offer a political as well as an architectural message.