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Baumgartner+Uriu "Apertures" at SCI-Arc Gallery

01:00 - 12 May, 2014
Baumgartner+Uriu "Apertures" at SCI-Arc Gallery, © Joshua White
© Joshua White

Apertures reflect a current architectural discourse of digital ecologies, emphasizing the relationship between the natural world and advances in digital technology, which leads to a new type of interactive, organic buildings. The installation focuses on a symbiotic relationship between nature, building morphologies, and material expression.

Pavilion Hacienda Matao / LEGORRETA + LEGORRETA

01:00 - 11 May, 2014
© Cristiano Mascaro
© Cristiano Mascaro
  • Architects

  • Location

    Matão - São Paulo, Brazil
  • Executive Architect

    Ricardo Lemus
  • Design Team

    Ricardo Legorreta, Víctor Legorreta, Noé Castro, Miguel Almaraz, Adriana Ciklik, Carlos Vargas
  • Area

    3500.0 m2
  • Year

    2014
  • Photography

    Cristiano Mascaro

© Cristiano Mascaro © Cristiano Mascaro © Cristiano Mascaro © Cristiano Mascaro +10

AD Classics: World Trade Center / Minoru Yamasaki Associates + Emery Roth & Sons

00:00 - 11 May, 2014
AD Classics: World Trade Center / Minoru Yamasaki Associates + Emery Roth & Sons, via Wikipedia Commons
via Wikipedia Commons

A New York City icon that once rivaled structures such as the Statue of Liberty and the Empire State Building, the World Trade Center, colloquially known as the Twin Towers, was one of the most recognized structures in history. Designed by Japanese-American architect Minoru Yamasaki, it held the title of Tallest Building in the World from 1972–1974.  Up until its unfortunate demise, the WTC site was a major destination, accommodating 500,000 working people and 80,000 visitors on a typical weekday.

© Flickr user David Farquhar via Wikipedia Commons via Wikipedia Commons via Wikipedia Commons +28

NBRS Proposes to Extend High Line Vertically

00:00 - 11 May, 2014
Exterior View. Image © NBRS + Partners
Exterior View. Image © NBRS + Partners

In response to New York City’s rapidly expanding population, NBRS + Partners has proposed a 40 story tall skyscraper that could help the city embrace its rapidly shifting demographics and size. Entitled “VIVO on High Line,” the adaptable steel-frame tower is essentially the vertical extension of the city’s beloved High Line park. 

“The podium screen engulfs the High Line folding it in and extending the lifeblood into the building base, like capillary action drawing it vertically,” described the team.

The Observatories: Micro Living for UK Artists

00:00 - 11 May, 2014
The Observatories: Micro Living for UK Artists, Exterior view of the observatories. Visuals by Lauren Shevills, Ross Galtress, Charlotte Knight, Mina Gospavic
Exterior view of the observatories. Visuals by Lauren Shevills, Ross Galtress, Charlotte Knight, Mina Gospavic

Five young design graduates based in Britain have recently won a competition to design an artist’s residency in the south-western region of the United Kingdom. Titled "The Observatories," these residences are split into two separate volumes: a study and a workshop. Artists will be able to live in the private back section of the study, which has a fold-out bed and necessary amenities. The workshop will be more open, allowing artists to teach and engage with the public. Both volumes are capable of rotating 360 degrees, giving residents a fresh frame of view, and facilitating interaction between these residents and passerby.

North Lake Wenatchee House / DeForest Architects

01:00 - 11 May, 2014
North Lake Wenatchee House / DeForest Architects, © Benjamin Benschneider
© Benjamin Benschneider

© Benjamin Benschneider © Benjamin Benschneider © Benjamin Benschneider © Benjamin Benschneider +13

  • Architects

  • Location

    Lake Wenatchee, Okanogan-Wenatchee National Forest, Washington 98826, United States
  • Architect in Charge

    John Deforest, Rosie Donovan, Brett Smith
  • Area

    2890.0 ft2
  • Project Year

    2010
  • Photographs

Terunobu Fujimori's Soft-Hard Zinc House Opens Near Tokyo

00:00 - 11 May, 2014
Terunobu Fujimori's Soft-Hard Zinc House Opens Near Tokyo, Soft-hard looking zinc house. Image © Maria Novozhilova
Soft-hard looking zinc house. Image © Maria Novozhilova

A new private house designed by an exceptional Japanese architect, Terunobu Fujimori, has opened. The new building is located in a small provincial town near to Tokyo. Neighbored by typical one-family residences, the newcomer comes to the fore. Different, shiny and apparently soft metallic façade catches the visitor’s eye. 

Yet the scale of the building is much smaller than one might expect. Every height, width and depth are accurately measured and left from a certain point of view spatially stingy: no waste is admissible here.

Shortlist Released for D.C. “Bridge Park”

01:00 - 11 May, 2014
Shortlist Released for D.C. “Bridge Park”, East River Blueway Plan - A recent project by shortlisted contestant WXY Studio (click to learn more).
East River Blueway Plan - A recent project by shortlisted contestant WXY Studio (click to learn more).

Six teams have been invited to form interdisciplinary teams in Washington D.C.’s 11th Street Bridge Park competition. Envisioned as a “21st century play space,” the project intends to unify two disconnected parts of the city with a single, multi-use parkscape that will span the width of the Anacostia River. If approved, the Bridge Park will host array of programs, from an education center and performance space, to a cafe and water sport activity areas. Review the complete list of shortlisted teams, after the break...

Garcias House / Warm Architects

01:00 - 11 May, 2014
Garcias House / Warm Architects, © Wacho Espinosa
© Wacho Espinosa

© Wacho Espinosa © Wacho Espinosa © Wacho Espinosa © Wacho Espinosa +34

  • Architects

  • Location

    Cancún, Quintana Roo, Mexico
  • Architect in Charge

    Carlos Armando del Castillo A
  • Design Team

    Carlos Armando del Castillo Huerta, Adriana Diaz Santin, Joaquin Morales Sarmiento
  • Area

    215.0 sqm
  • Project Year

    2014
  • Photographs

Toro Canyon House / Bestor Architecture

01:00 - 11 May, 2014
Toro Canyon House  / Bestor Architecture, © Laure Joliet
© Laure Joliet

© Laure Joliet © Laure Joliet © Laure Joliet © Laure Joliet +20

  • Architects

  • Location

    Santa Barbara County, CA, USA
  • Partner In Charge

    Barbara Bestor
  • Project Manager / Architect

    Selena Linkous
  • Project Team

    Daniel Rabin
  • Area

    4700.0 ft2
  • Project Year

    2012
  • Photographs

DM HOUSE / Studio Guilherme Torres

01:00 - 11 May, 2014
DM HOUSE / Studio Guilherme Torres, © Denilson Machada
© Denilson Machada

© Denilson Machada © Denilson Machada © Denilson Machada © Denilson Machada +34

Minha Casa, Nossa Cidade: Brazil’s Social Housing Policy & The Failures of the Private-Public System

00:00 - 11 May, 2014
Courtesy of Ruby Press
Courtesy of Ruby Press

In 2009, the Brazilian government launched the social housing program “Minha Casa, Minha Vida” (“My House, My Life”), which aims to build 3.4 million housing units by the end of 2014. Minha Casa—Nossa Cidade (Ruby Press, 2014), produced by the MAS Urban Design program at the ETH Zurich, examines the project at a critical time and presents ways to improve its design and implementation. Divided into three chapters, the book reviews the history, guidelines, and construction of the “Minha Casa, Minha Vida” program (MCMV) through long-form essays, opinion pieces, interviews, diagrams, and photographic image material. The following excerpt, written by Sandra Becker, proposes an answer to the question of why the program - despite its aims to meet the huge demand for housing for low-income families - has thus far failed to provide the Brazilian people the “quality cities [they] desire.” 

From the Publisher. In June 2013, Brazil saw a wave of protests unprecedented in the country's history. Millions of people filled the streets demanding better education, public transportation, and healthcare. While the rage driving the protests was directed at politicians, it is unlikely that the problem can be reduced to the failure of the political system. Instead, shouldn't the protests point out the inequalities caused by the neoliberal policies that dominate the global economy?

In the first quarter of 2009, responding to the global financial crisis that had begun the previous year, the Brazilian government launched an ambitious social housing program to encourage the economy's construction sector. The program, “Minha Casa, Minha Vida,” was initially developed to build one million houses. In September 2011, the program launched its second phase with a goal of providing another 2.4 million housing units. The program aims to confront a historical deficiency in housing, a shortage of approximately 5.8 million dwellings.

JA 93: KAZUO SHINOHARA – Complete Works in Original Publications

00:00 - 11 May, 2014
JA 93: KAZUO SHINOHARA – Complete Works in Original Publications

From the publisher. JA93 Spring 2014 issue features 55 works by Kazuo Shinohara, one of the most influential architects in the generation after the Metabolists. The issue consists of photographs and drawings which appeared in the original issues of Shinkenchiku and original descriptive texts by the architect.

Jalan Mat Jambol / Zarch Collaboratives

01:00 - 10 May, 2014
Jalan Mat Jambol / Zarch Collaboratives, © Albert Lim
© Albert Lim

© Albert Lim © Albert Lim © Albert Lim © Albert Lim +17

  • Architects

  • Location

    Jalan Mat Jambol, Singapore
  • Project Team

    Randy Chan
  • Area

    3700.0 ft2
  • Project Year

    2012
  • Photographs

Toomath's Legacy: Defining Modern New Zealand Architecture

00:00 - 10 May, 2014
Toomath's Legacy: Defining Modern New Zealand Architecture, Toomath House, view of the Oriental Bay. Image © Simon Devitt
Toomath House, view of the Oriental Bay. Image © Simon Devitt

"What makes us New Zealanders different from, say, Australians?" William Toomath, the late modernist architect, asked himself this question at the onset of his career. In this article published by the Australian Design Review, Jack Davies takes a look at Toomath's work and how he helped define New Zealand architecture. To keep reading, click here.

O+A: In Search of Optimal Office Design

01:00 - 10 May, 2014
O+A: In Search of Optimal Office Design,  The Giant Pixel Corporation: This software development company in San Francisco occupies three tight floors of largely open-plan space. “We tried to provide different levels of acoustical privacy,” says O+A cofounder Denise Cherry. “The fully enclosed conference room is for confidential conversations, but you also have in-between spaces, like the canopied cabanas, which are connected to the work area—connected to the open plan—but still have some acoustic and even some visual separation.” Conference room ceiling made of recording-studio foam manufactured by Auralex. Image © Jasper Sanidad
The Giant Pixel Corporation: This software development company in San Francisco occupies three tight floors of largely open-plan space. “We tried to provide different levels of acoustical privacy,” says O+A cofounder Denise Cherry. “The fully enclosed conference room is for confidential conversations, but you also have in-between spaces, like the canopied cabanas, which are connected to the work area—connected to the open plan—but still have some acoustic and even some visual separation.” Conference room ceiling made of recording-studio foam manufactured by Auralex. Image © Jasper Sanidad

Although office design has dramatically and drastically changed over the course of the 20th century, we aren't finished yet. San Francisco firm O+A is actively searching for today's optimal office design, designing work spaces to encourage both concentration and collaboration by merging elements from the cubicle-style office with those popularized by Steve Jobs. In this article, originally published by Metropolis Magazine as “Noises Off,” Eva Hagberg takes a look at some of their built works.

In the beginning was the cubicle. And the cubicle was almost everywhere, and the cubicle held almost everyone, and it was good. Then there was the backlash, and the cubicle was destroyed, put aside, swept away in favor of the open plan, the endless span of space, floor, and ceiling—punctuated by the occasional column so that the roof wouldn’t collapse onto the floor plate—and everyone talked about collaboration, togetherness, synergy, randomness and happenstance. Renzo Piano designed a New York Times building with open stairways so writers and editors could (would have to) run into one another, and everyone remembered the always-ahead-of-the-curve Steve Jobs who, when he was running Pixar, asked for only two bathrooms in the whole Emeryville building, and insisted they be put on the ground floor lobby so that designers and renderers could (would have to) run into each other, and such was the office culture of the new millennium.  

And then there was the backlash to the backlash. Those writers wanted their own offices, and editors wanted privacy, and not everyone wanted to be running into people all the time, because not everyone was actually collaborating, even though their bosses and their bosses’ bosses said that they should, because collaboration, teamwork, and togetherness—these were the new workplace buzzwords. Until they weren’t. Until people realized that they were missing—as architect Ben Jacobson said in a Gensler sponsored panel on the need to create a balance between focus and collaboration—the concept of “parallel play,” i.e. people working next to each other, but not necessarily with each other. Until individuality came back, particularly in San Francisco in the tech scene, and particularly in the iconoclastic start-up tech scene, where people began to want something a little different.

Yelp:  The cafeteria at Yelp's 110,000-square-foot campus in San Francisco features warm wood walls and light-emitting ropes. Image © Jasper Sanidad  The Tectum ceiling panels (above) appear to be largely aesthetic. “They make a beautiful pattern, but it’s not a random one,” Cherry says. “By offsetting those vertical baffles, you’re creating a series of sound barriers, so they’re actually doing double duty”. Image © Jasper Sanidad A felt canopied cabana inside the Giant Pixel offices in San Francisco. “We are open-office fanatics,” says Verda Alexander at O+A. “But it’s too simple to say a space is just open plan, because at the same time we’re creating ‘other’ spaces that mix with open-plan work areas.”  Partial acoustic and visual separation made possible by felt material manufactured by Filzfelt. Image © Jasper Sanidad  Capital One Labs:  The bank has created entrepreneurial Capital One Labs in three cities: Washington, D.C., New York City, and San Francisco. The Bay Area outpost, designed by O+A, has 35 full-time employees operating in an open-plan space that looks and feels like a hotel lobby. The fully upholstered cubby is, Cherry says, “a cozy place to tuck away. Even though it’s really just a big open workplace, we also created these quiet little respites.”  The fully upholstered cubby, lined with Paul Smith Plaid cloth by Maharam, isolates sound while still maintaining a visual link to the rest of the space. Image © Jasper Sanidad +8

Great Ocean RD / ITN Architects

01:00 - 10 May, 2014
© Aidan Halloran
© Aidan Halloran

© Aidan Halloran © Aidan Halloran © Aidan Halloran © Aidan Halloran +28

"Every Building is a Social Critique" - Polshek Describes His Oeuvre in Latest Book

00:00 - 10 May, 2014
"Every Building is a Social Critique" - Polshek Describes His Oeuvre in Latest Book, Polshek's memorable design for the Rose Center for Earth and Space (2000) at the American Museum of Natural History in New York. Image © Timothy Hursley
Polshek's memorable design for the Rose Center for Earth and Space (2000) at the American Museum of Natural History in New York. Image © Timothy Hursley

While architects don't always see the connection between politics, social constructs, and architecture, James Stewart Polshek considers the three indivisible. In an interview on Metropolis Magazine about his newly released book Build, Memory, he describes how this belief launched his career 65 years ago. To learn more about Polshek's approach to architecture and the publication, click here.