ArchDaily | Broadcasting Architecture Worldwidethe world's most visited architecture website

i

Sign up now and start saving and organizing your favorite architecture projects and photos

i

Find the most inspiring products for your projects in our Product Catalog.

i

Get the ArchDaily Chrome Extension and be inspired with every new tab. Install here »

h

Nominate now the Building of the Year 2017 »

All
Projects
Products
Events
Competitions

Material Substance: When Material and Mechanism are One

00:00 - 31 March, 2014
Material Substance: When Material and Mechanism are One

The following is the first article of Material Substance, a column, penned by Christopher Brenny and presented by AD Materials, which investigates the innovative applications of materials in architecture.

A material is nothing without a process. The characteristics of plastic, for example, vary dramatically depending on where and how the raw material is applied during the forming process. The same material can be used to create a bag, a solid container, or a woven textile. The difference between a disposable water bottle and carpeting is so distinct that one could not make the material connection without some foreknowledge of the manufacturing process of each.

The result of this material ecosystem is a scenario in which design and manufacturing must inform one another. This connection often moves so slowly in the building industry that it is difficult to perceive and very slow to adapt. Shape memory alloys such as nitinol (muscle wire), for example, are gradually moving into public nomenclature. While the novelty of such materials is ripe for exploration, application has proven difficult as the cost of such materials is quite prohibitive. Shape memory alloys, unless they are developed using more abundant metals such as aluminum, will likely remain a niche product developed for very specific applications.

Memory plastics, while less developed and responsive, have significant potential to become a familiar fixture in our daily lives. Combining this technology with the lightweight, structural capabilities of foamed materials, our preconceptions of the portable and flat packed may soon transform from disposable and insubstantial into something much more beautiful and valuable.

CR House / DAS

01:00 - 31 March, 2014
CR House  / DAS, © Yoshihiro Koitani
© Yoshihiro Koitani

© Yoshihiro Koitani © Rafael Gamo © Rafael Gamo © Rafael Gamo +19

  • Architects

  • Location

    San Ángel, Álvaro Obregón, 01000 Mexico City, Federal District, Mexico
  • Design Team

    Gerardo Asali, Pedro Sánchez, Andrea Cruz, Jesús Ávila, Daniel Mastretta.
  • Project Area

    770.0 m2
  • Project Year

    2012
  • Photography

    Yoshihiro Koitani, Rafael Gamo

Kitchen in Lima / Ghezzi Novak

01:00 - 31 March, 2014
Kitchen in Lima  / Ghezzi Novak, © Renzo Rebagliati
© Renzo Rebagliati

© Renzo Rebagliati © Renzo Rebagliati © Renzo Rebagliati © Renzo Rebagliati +26

  • Architects

  • Location

    Prolongacion Arenales, Miraflores, Peru
  • Architect in Charge

    Arturo Ghezzi Novak y Gustavo Ghezzi Novak
  • Project Area

    800.0 m2
  • Photography

    Renzo Rebagliati

Emerson College Los Angeles / Morphosis Architects

01:00 - 31 March, 2014
Emerson College Los Angeles / Morphosis Architects, ©  Iwan Baan
© Iwan Baan

©  Iwan Baan ©  Iwan Baan ©  Iwan Baan ©  Iwan Baan +26

  • Architects

  • Location

    5960 Sunset Boulevard, Los Angeles, CA 90028, United States
  • Design Director

    Thom Mayne
  • Project Principal & Manager

    Kim Groves
  • Lead Project Designer

    Chandler Ahrens
  • Project Architect

    Aaron Ragan
  • Area

    107400.0 ft2
  • Project Year

    2014
  • Photographs

Cruise Ship Terminal in the Port of Seville / Hombre de Piedra + Buró4

01:00 - 31 March, 2014
Cruise Ship Terminal in the Port of Seville / Hombre de Piedra + Buró4, © Jesús Granada
© Jesús Granada

© Jesús Granada © Jesús Granada © Jesús Granada © Jesús Granada +23

  • Architects

  • Location

    Port de Séville, 41011 Seville, Sevilla, Spain
  • Architect in Charge Buró 4 Arquitectos

    Jesús Díaz Gómez, 
José Luis Sainz-Pardo Prieto-Castro, Ramón de los Santos Cuevas Rebollo, Jorge Ferral Sevilla
  • Architect in Charge Hombre de Piedra

    Juan Manuel Rojas Fernández, Laura Domínguez Hernández
  • Design Team

    Juan Manuel Rojas Fernández, 
Jesús Díaz Gómez
, José Luis Sainz-Pardo Prieto-Castro, Ramón de los Santos Cuevas Rebollo, Jorge Ferral Sevilla, Laura Domínguez Hernández, Francisco Javier Carmona Stamatis Zografos
, Cristiano Rossi, Angelene Clarke
  • Area

    508.0 sqm
  • Project Year

    2013
  • Photographs

Villa Vista / Shigeru Ban Architects

01:00 - 31 March, 2014
Villa Vista / Shigeru Ban Architects, © Hiroyuki Hirai
© Hiroyuki Hirai

© Hiroyuki Hirai © Hiroyuki Hirai © Hiroyuki Hirai © Hiroyuki Hirai +29

  • Architects

  • Location

    Weligama, Sri Lanka
  • Architect in Charge

    Shigeru Ban Architects Europe/ Shigeru Ban, Yasunori Harano
  • Area

    825.0 sqm
  • Project Year

    2010
  • Photographs

Symposium: Interpretations / Critical Shifts

00:00 - 31 March, 2014
Symposium: Interpretations / Critical Shifts

Critical Shifts is a one-day, student-organized symposium dedicated to exploring the ongoing transformations of critical practice in architecture. The event brings together a diverse group of practitioners in order to investigate how their work (which often combines the activities and approaches of curation, editing, writing, design, teaching, and research) can begin to trace a nuanced map of the fieldʼs current critical terrain.

G-Star RAW HQ / OMA

01:00 - 31 March, 2014
G-Star RAW HQ / OMA, Courtesy of OMA - G-Star
Courtesy of OMA - G-Star

Courtesy of OMA - G-Star Courtesy of OMA - G-Star Courtesy of OMA - G-Star Courtesy of OMA - G-Star +26

  • Architects

  • Location

    Joan Muyskenweg 39, 1099 Amsterdam, The Netherlands
  • Architect in Charge

    Rem Koolhaas, Reinier de Graaf, Ellen van Loon
  • Current Team (construction + interiors)

    Katrien van Dijk (project leader), Tjeerd van de Sandt, Saskia Simon, Marina Cogliani, Jung-Won Yoon
  • Area

    19000.0 sqm
  • Project Year

    2014
  • Photographs

    Courtesy of OMA - G-Star

JA Curve Church / ZIP Partners Architecture

01:00 - 31 March, 2014
JA Curve Church / ZIP Partners Architecture, © Choi Hyuk-jae
© Choi Hyuk-jae

© Choi Hyuk-jae © Choi Hyuk-jae © Choi Hyuk-jae © Choi Hyuk-jae +27

Lecture Series: Japanese Architecture at at Cologne University

00:00 - 31 March, 2014
Lecture Series: Japanese Architecture at at Cologne University

The Faculty of Architecture at the Cologne University of Applied Sciences will host a lecture series on Japanese architecture. The program will start April 8 with Junya Ishigami and will continue until June 24 with lectures by Shin Takamatsu & Takeshi Katagiri, recent Pritzker Prize winner Shigeru Ban, Ryusuke Kojio, Sou Fujimoto, Hitoshi Abe and Hiroaki Kimura. 

RIBA Future Trends Survey Indicates An "All-Time High" for Workloads

00:00 - 31 March, 2014
RIBA Future Trends Survey Indicates An "All-Time High" for Workloads, Courtesy of RIBA
Courtesy of RIBA

The latest Future Trends Survey, published by the Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA), indicates an "all-time high" for architects' workload with "confidence levels about future workloads continuing to rise." The February report shows +41 in the Future Trends Workload Index, up from +35 in January, with the highest balance figures coming from London (+54) and Scotland (+60). The optimistic report suggests that there "still appears to be significant spare capacity within the profession," noting that many practices actually under-employed in the last month.

Fernando Guerra On Photography In The Internet Age

01:00 - 31 March, 2014
Aires Mateus Arquitectos / House in Alcobaça, Portugal. Image © Fernando Guerra
Aires Mateus Arquitectos / House in Alcobaça, Portugal. Image © Fernando Guerra

In this interview, originally published by Paperhouses as "Decisive Moment: Conversation With Fernando Guerra", the Portuguese photographer details his career in architectural photography, and how he approaches the art of photographing buildings. As an advocate of free sharing and online publicity, and one of a new breed of photographers who - shock horror - likes to include people in his shots of buildings, Guerra is well placed to explain how the world of architectural photography has changed over the past decade.

I do not want to call it an interview—it was a fabulous discussion that Fernando Guerra led as a loose narrative with notes on work that he practices with hedonism and filled with life. They are all stories dedicated to the great beauty of doing what one loves and letting it grow.

Read on after the break for the interview

SZ-HK Biennale-Silo Reconversion / O-OFFICE Architects

01:00 - 31 March, 2014
SZ-HK Biennale-Silo Reconversion / O-OFFICE Architects, © O-office & Maurer United
© O-office & Maurer United

© O-office & Maurer United © O-office & Maurer United © O-office & Maurer United © O-office & Maurer United +27

  • Architects

  • Location

    Chiwan Road, Nanshan, Shenzhen, Guangdong, China
  • Design Team

    Jianxiang He, Ying Jiang, Thomas Odorico, Zilong Liang
  • Concept

    Ying Jiang (O-office Architects), Marc Maurer (Maurer United Architects), Teemu Hirvilaammi (Lassila\Hirvilammi Architects)
  • Area

    2662.0 sqm
  • Project Year

    2013
  • Photographs

Chinquihue Stadium / Cristian Fernandez Arquitectos

01:00 - 31 March, 2014
Chinquihue Stadium / Cristian Fernandez Arquitectos, © Felipe Diaz
© Felipe Diaz

© Felipe Diaz Courtesy of Cristián Fernández Arquitectos Courtesy of Cristián Fernández Arquitectos © Felipe Diaz +27

  • Architects

  • Location

    Estadio Chinquihue, Puerto Montt, Los Lagos Region, Chile
  • Project Area

    3791.0 m2
  • Project Year

    2013
  • Photography

    Felipe Diaz, Cortesía de Cristián Fernández Arquitectos

Shenzhen Maritime Base and Sports Schools / 2A2 Design Department, Beijing Institute of Architectural Design (BIAD)

01:00 - 31 March, 2014
Shenzhen Maritime Base and Sports Schools / 2A2 Design Department, Beijing Institute of Architectural Design (BIAD), © Yang ChaoYing
© Yang ChaoYing

© Yang ChaoYing © Yang ChaoYing © Yang ChaoYing © Yang ChaoYing +43

eVolo Skyscraper Winner 2014 Transforms Korean 'Hanok' Into Impressive High-Rise

00:00 - 31 March, 2014
eVolo Skyscraper Winner 2014 Transforms Korean 'Hanok' Into Impressive High-Rise, Visualisation. Image © Yong Ju Lee
Visualisation. Image © Yong Ju Lee

Vernacular Versatility, recently awarded first place in the 2014 eVolo Skyscraper Competition, seeks to adapt traditional Korean architecture into a contemporary mixed-use high-rise. The vernacular design of the Hanok, the "antonym of a western house" and epitome of the Korean style, has disappeared from every town. Extensive urban development in the 1970s led to a boom in modern apartment dwellings and, consequently, a loss of established Korean vernacular architecture. Yong Ju Lee's proposal aims to reimagine the Hanok in one of the country's busiest districts, drawing people's attention to and stimulating their interest in traditional architecture with the intention that "it will eventually be absorbed into people’s everyday lives"

© Yong Ju Lee Model. Image © Yong Ju Lee Model. Image © Yong Ju Lee Visualisation. Image © Yong Ju Lee +9

Cool Spaces! Premiers Tomorrow, Puts Architecture in the Spotlight

00:00 - 31 March, 2014
Cool Spaces! Premiers Tomorrow, Puts Architecture in the Spotlight, Kauffman Center for the Performing Arts / Moshe Safdie. Image © Tim Hursley
Kauffman Center for the Performing Arts / Moshe Safdie. Image © Tim Hursley

Stephen Chung's new PBS show Cool Spaces! hopes to engage the general public’s perception of design by "demystifying" contemporary architectural practice. You can tune in to the hour-long premier tomorrow (April 1) as Chung investigates the sports and performing arts spaces of Moshe Safdie (Kauffman Center for Performing Arts), HKS (Dallas Cowboys Stadium), and SHoP (Barclays Center).

The Indicator: Thank You, Patrik Schumacher

00:00 - 31 March, 2014
The Indicator: Thank You, Patrik Schumacher, "Architects are in charge of the FORM of the built environment, not its content. We need to grasp this and run with this despite all the (ultimately conservative) moralizing political correctness that is trying to paralyse us with bad conscience and arrest our explorations..." - Patrik Schumacher. Above, the MAXXI Museum by Zaha Hadid Architects. Image © Iwan Baan
"Architects are in charge of the FORM of the built environment, not its content. We need to grasp this and run with this despite all the (ultimately conservative) moralizing political correctness that is trying to paralyse us with bad conscience and arrest our explorations..." - Patrik Schumacher. Above, the MAXXI Museum by Zaha Hadid Architects. Image © Iwan Baan

First off, I would like to thank Patrik Schumacher for taking to Facebook on March 17 at 9:45pm to let off steam -- thus starting a meaningful discussion on the role of the architect in society and culture. We could deconstruct it line by line, but I don’t think that will yield much in the way of enlightenment. What I take from it is that architecture creates form and should be free to do so without being restricted by ethical or moral imperatives to be social or political. But, as Benjamin Bratton remarked in reply to Schumacher, “To set the political to one side and at the same time make grandiose claims for how architectural form can in fact ‘remake civilization’, is a self-defeating program.”

Perceptions on the role of architecture in society can easily fall along class, race, and national lines. Coming from a place of privilege, it is easy to assume an apolitical, form-making agenda for the profession. The argument that architecture has nothing to do with the social domain, or the “content” as Schumacher calls it, is an argument for political conservatism, a hands-off, sink or swim argument for social Darwinism, that limits the range and impact of high architecture. Why can’t the best and most challenging forms of architecture penetrate through all social strata? Why shouldn’t it serve the poor? And why shouldn’t this be one criteria among others for judging the value of architecture?