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Social Security Fund for Lawyers / Sergio Alberto Cabrera Arquitectos

01:00 - 30 June, 2014
Social Security Fund for Lawyers / Sergio Alberto Cabrera Arquitectos, © Federico Cairoli
© Federico Cairoli

© Federico Cairoli © Federico Cairoli © Federico Cairoli © Federico Cairoli +37

Conference: Urban Routines 2013/14

00:00 - 30 June, 2014
Conference: Urban Routines 2013/14

Russian city dwellers live their daily lives, drive cars on busy streets, sit in front of computers in offices, buy groceries and other goods in supermarkets and shops, bring up their children and watch television at home. This decidedly typical Lebenswelt, routine, everyday, the gigantic and complex world of the ordinary, is under-researched and poorly analysed. The theme for Strelka’s 2013-2014 research school year is Urban Routines

Moscow Launches Competition to Design 2 New Metro Stations

01:00 - 30 June, 2014
Moscow Launches Competition to Design 2 New Metro Stations, Slavyanskij Bulvar Metro Station. Image © Flickr CC User Sergey Yeliseev
Slavyanskij Bulvar Metro Station. Image © Flickr CC User Sergey Yeliseev

The Moscow Metropolitan is the second busiest metro line in the world, transporting 2.4 billion passengers a year. However despite this, it is a long way short of being the most extensive, with Beijing, Shanghai, London, New York, Tokyo, and Madrid all surpassing it in terms of total track length.

In order to rectify this, in 2012 Moscow launched an ambitious expansion plan, aiming to add over 150km of tracks and 70 new stations by 2020. For the first time, they have launched a competition to design two of these new stations in the South-West of the city, in the Solntsevo and Novo-Peredelkino Districts.

Read on for more about the Moscow Metro and the competition

Drumnacraig – Extension / MacGabhann Architects

01:00 - 30 June, 2014
Drumnacraig – Extension / MacGabhann Architects, © Paul McGuicken
© Paul McGuicken

© Paul McGuicken © Paul McGuicken © Paul McGuicken © Paul McGuicken +26

  • Architects

  • Location

    Co. Donegal, Ireland
  • Design Team

    Antoin MacGabhann, Tarla MacGabhann, Bjoern Patzwald, Alison Ellis, Michael Doherty
  • Project Year

    2011
  • Photographs

DAS HAUS 2014 / Louise Campbell

01:00 - 30 June, 2014
DAS HAUS 2014 / Louise Campbell, © Koelnmesse, Studio
© Koelnmesse, Studio

© Koelnmesse, Studio © Koelnmesse, Studio © Koelnmesse, Studio © Koelnmesse, Studio +30

Australian Plant Bank / BVN Donovan Hill

01:00 - 30 June, 2014
©  John Gollings
© John Gollings
  • Architects

  • Location

    Mount Annan NSW 2567, Australia
  • Architect in Charge

    Alex Chaston
  • Project Director

    Peter Titmuss
  • Project Principal

    James Grose
  • Project Year

    2013
  • Photographs

©  John Gollings ©  John Gollings ©  John Gollings ©  John Gollings +46

Hikariniwa House / MTKarchitects

01:00 - 30 June, 2014
Hikariniwa House / MTKarchitects, © Yuko Tada
© Yuko Tada

© Yuko Tada © Yuko Tada © Yuko Tada © Yuko Tada +14

  • Architects

  • Location

    Matsumoto, Nagano, Japan
  • Architect in Charge

    Akira Metoki
  • Area

    128.0 sqm
  • Project Year

    2014
  • Photographs

Casa en Gardelegui / Roberto Ercilla Arquitectura

01:00 - 30 June, 2014
Casa en Gardelegui  / Roberto Ercilla Arquitectura, © César San Millán
© César San Millán

© César San Millán © César San Millán © César San Millán © César San Millán +27

Jiahe Boutique Hotel / Shangai Dushe Architecture Design

00:00 - 30 June, 2014
Jiahe Boutique Hotel / Shangai Dushe Architecture Design, © Su shengliang
© Su shengliang

© Su shengliang © Su shengliang © Su shengliang © Su shengliang +48

SALES ODDITY by Andrés Jaque, Silver Lion for Research at the Venice Biennale

00:00 - 30 June, 2014

By the late 1960s, two dynamics were shaping a new urban reality in Italy: on the one hand, TV was heavily influencing Italian society, becoming an intrinsic part of daily life; on the other, the social tension resulting from student protests and accelerated immigration had begun to impact cities in a chaotic way. These dynamics paved the way for Milano Due, a new town on the outskirts of Milan, which promised a new, idyllic type of urbanism.

The complex, although traditional in appearance with its red pitched roofs, put into practice modern concepts: its 2,600 apartments, which had access to amenities for education and entertainment, were arranged around a giant artificial garden/lake and were connected via an elevated circulation system. Below ground, the complex housed the studios of the first private TV channel in Italy, a fact that would shape the lives of the inhabitants of Milano Due and eventually all of Italian society.

This interesting urban phenomena is analyzed by Andrés Jaque / Office for Political Innovation in “SALES ODDITY: Milano 2 and the Politics of Direct-to-Home TV Urbanism,” a project that was part of the Monditalia section at the Venice Biennale and was awarded the Silver Lion for the Best Research Project. According to the jury “The project presents critically a fundamental aspect of modern societies: how the power of media occupies other social spaces, both physically and politically. It is based on innovative research combining surveys and interviews with planners and residents and re-appropriation of the mass media language. While based on an Italian case, this issue is present in many international contexts dominated by contemporary technological and neo-liberal cultures.”

Dossier, trailer, and more photos of the project by Miguel de Guzmán, after the break:

SALES ODDITY. Milano 2 and the Politics of Direct-to-Home TV Urbanism
by Andrés Jaque / Office for Political Innovation

Luker House in Barnes / Jamie Fobert Architects

01:00 - 30 June, 2014
Luker House in Barnes / Jamie Fobert Architects, Courtesy of Jamie Fobert Architects
Courtesy of Jamie Fobert Architects

Courtesy of Jamie Fobert Architects Courtesy of Jamie Fobert Architects Courtesy of Jamie Fobert Architects Courtesy of Jamie Fobert Architects +10

  • Architects

  • Location

    Barnes, London SW13, United Kingdom
  • Project Year

    2014
  • Photographs

    Courtesy of Jamie Fobert Architects

London Calling: British Modernism's Watershed Moment - The Churchill College Competition

01:00 - 30 June, 2014
London Calling: British Modernism's Watershed Moment - The Churchill College Competition, Courtesy of Churchill College
Courtesy of Churchill College

Fifty years ago Churchill College Cambridge opened its doors. In contrast to the historic Colleges, with their medieval Gothic and Neo-Classical buildings corralled behind high walls, this was in an almost rural setting on the outskirts of the city, modern in design, and Brutalist in detail. 

The 1959 competition that brought the College into being is considered by many to be a watershed moment in British Post War architectural history. It brought together 20 names, young and old, all practicing in Britain, all working in the Modernist and more specifically the nascent Brutalist style. It was a “who’s who” of British architecture at the time, including the Smithsons, Hungarian-born Erno Goldfinger, Lasdun (then in partnership with Maxwell Fry, Jane Drew & Lindsay Drake, and formerly with Russian émigré Lubetkin), Lyons Israel Ellis and Robert Matthew (one half of the Royal Festival Hall team, who teamed up with Johnson Marshall). None of these made the shortlist of four.

Proposal: Stirling & Gowan. Image Courtesy of James Gowan and the Canadian Centre for Architecture, via e-architect Proposal: Richard Sheppard, Robson & Partners. Image Courtesy of Sheppard Robson, via e-architect Proposal: Chamberlin, Powell & Bon. Image Courtesy of Frank Woods, via e-architect The library from Stirling and Gowan’s entry to the Churchill College, Cambridge competition (1958). Image Courtesy of BD Online +19

How Can We Hold On To Heritage Skills?

00:00 - 30 June, 2014
How Can We Hold On To Heritage Skills?, © James Taylor-Foster
© James Taylor-Foster

In an age when 1:1 3D printed buildings are becoming ever more commonplace from the Netherlands to China, it's important to pause and assess the existing built fabric of our cities, towns and villages. If we want to maintain and preserve them whilst protecting the inherent craft imbued in their construction, the importance of nurturing and promoting these skills should be recognised.

In the UK, the Heritage Skills Hub (HSH) push to see "traditional building skills, conservation, restoration and responsible retrofit" included within all mainstream built environment courses. In a recent conversation with Cathie Clarke, CEO of the HSH, we discussed the obstacles faced by an organisation dedicated to conserving and teaching skills like stonemasonry, roof thatching, glass making, traditional brick construction to a new generation.

Boris Johnson Speech Reignites Row Over Mount Pleasant Development

00:00 - 30 June, 2014
Boris Johnson Speech Reignites Row Over Mount Pleasant Development , Courtesy of Cityscape
Courtesy of Cityscape

The controversial Mount Pleasant development in London has sparked another row this week, as campaigners accused Mayor Boris Johnson of "compromising his neutrality" over the 681-home scheme which he has called in to review personally. Though he is supposed to remain neutral until the hearing, last week Johnson remarked in a speech that the development "will be a wonderful place to live." However many have expressed concern over the design, including Thomas Heatherwick, who lives locally and called the scheme "empty, cynical and vacuous." Read all the details at BD Online.

Smiljan Radic's Serpentine Pavilion / Images by Danica O. Kus

01:00 - 30 June, 2014
Smiljan Radic's Serpentine Pavilion / Images by Danica O. Kus, © Danica O. Kus
© Danica O. Kus

Architecture photographer Danica O. Kus has shared with us images of the 2014 Serpentine Gallery Pavilion, designed by Chilean architect Smiljan Radić. For a closer look at this unusual pavilion, inspired by Oscar Wilde's short story The Selfish Giant, check out all of Ms. Kus' images after the break.

© Danica O. Kus © Danica O. Kus © Danica O. Kus © Danica O. Kus +20

Washington D.C. - The Most Walkable City in the US?

00:00 - 29 June, 2014
Chicago is the fifth most walkable city. Image © Vincent Desjardins via Flickr
Chicago is the fifth most walkable city. Image © Vincent Desjardins via Flickr

new report from Christopher Leinberger and Patrick Lynch at The George Washington University School of Business has unexpectedly named Washington D.C. the most walkable city in the U.S., trumping expected favorites like New York, which ranked second.

Respectively rounding out the top five were Boston, San Francisco, and Chicago. Although a mere 2.8 percent of the population is estimated to walk to work, the report's authors believe the results are indicative of urban development moving away from automobile dependency and sprawl - an event they consider as significant as Frederick Jackson Turner declaring the "closing of the frontier" in 1893.

Alcohol and Urbanism, a Case Study: Breaking New York City’s Open Container Law

00:00 - 29 June, 2014
Brighton Beach, Brooklyn. Image © Rennie Jones
Brighton Beach, Brooklyn. Image © Rennie Jones

If there is one thing to be learned from the unsuccessful prohibition period of the 1920s, it is that we, the people, will go to great lengths to exercise our right to drink alcohol in the company of others. Our determined forefathers could have simply enjoyed a small-batch bathtub brew in the comfort of their own homes, but instead they established a system of secret places to congregate and consume collectively, even under threat of federal prosecution. Though it is no longer a felony to consume alcohol, New Yorkers are still pushing the legal limits of drinking with others, challenging the open container laws that prohibit public drinking.

Drinking is a recreational activity. It is a means of stepping beyond the realm of normal perception and seeing things differently, in the metaphorical sense (though sometimes a literal one). It is an act of recreation and repose, the parallel of peering at passerby from a park bench. In New York City, as in most of the United States, it is illegal for any person to possess an open container of an alcoholic beverage in any public place, “except at a block party, feast or similar function for which a permit has been obtained." Rarely do individuals have the resources for a block party or occasion for a full-scale public feast. More likely, they simply seek to crack open a can with neighbors on their front steps or with friends in Central Park, thereby enjoying a beverage in one of the country’s most vibrant and diverse public spheres for a mere penance. Unfortunately, that is not a legal option. Even the outdoor space we own is not completely open to our discretionary use: a resident cannot drink on his own stoop because it is “a place to which the public or a substantial group of persons has access."

Easterbrook House / Dorrington Atcheson Architects

01:00 - 29 June, 2014
Easterbrook House / Dorrington Atcheson Architects, © Emma-Jane Hetherington
© Emma-Jane Hetherington

© Emma-Jane Hetherington © Emma-Jane Hetherington © Emma-Jane Hetherington © Emma-Jane Hetherington +16