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Quinlan Terry Among Four to Receive "New Year Honours" for Services in UK Architecture

00:00 - 31 December, 2014
Quinlan Terry Among Four to Receive "New Year Honours" for Services in UK Architecture, 30 St Mary Axe “The Gherkin” / Foster + Partners . Image © Flickr CC User Maciek Lulko
30 St Mary Axe “The Gherkin” / Foster + Partners . Image © Flickr CC User Maciek Lulko

John Quinlan Terry, one of Prince Charles' preferred architects, is being recognized on the UK’s 2015 New Year Honours list and awarded the Commander of the Order of the British Empire (CBE) for his services in classical architecture. The Queen’s annual awards will also be honoring architect Cecil Balmond, former deputy chairman of UK Arup, with the Officer of the Order of the British Empire (OBE). Former City Planning Officer and professor Peter Wynne Rees, who oversaw the realization of the Gherkin and highly disputed Walkie Talkie, will also receive a CBE for his services. Katharine Heron, professor of Architecture University of Westminster, has been selected to receive a Members of the Order of the British Empire (MBE) for her services to architecture and higher education. 

The 14 Best Articles of 2014

01:00 - 31 December, 2014
The 14 Best Articles of 2014

At ArchDaily, we take great pride in bringing our readers the best selection of architectural projects and news stories around, but another big part of our editorial mission also involves giving architects access to the knowledge that will help them improve the lives of future urban dwellers. As the year draws to a close, each of the editors at ArchDaily has personally selected their favorite articles from the past year which complement this editorial mission. These articles may not be the ones that garnered the most attention or views, but we think they are vital nonetheless.

Our top 14 of 2014 includes coverage of crucial events, like the attention-grabbing competition that broke almost every record going, and an architectural model that redefined the idea of political protest; it features profiles of people who are redefining the profession, including both one of the world's most famous architects who had one of his greatest years yet, and a woman who spends most of her time working with sewage; and it includes insightful histories, such as how communist architecture developed in the mid-twentieth century, and how that period is now defining architecture in a modern-day communist superpower. Read on to find out which articles made our list as the best of the past year.

TY / Yo Yamagata Architects + AND Associates

01:00 - 31 December, 2014
TY / Yo Yamagata Architects + AND Associates, © Forward Stroke / Koji Okumura
© Forward Stroke / Koji Okumura

© Forward Stroke / Koji Okumura © Forward Stroke / Koji Okumura © Forward Stroke / Koji Okumura © Forward Stroke / Koji Okumura +25

Central Park First Stage / Migdal Arquitectos

01:00 - 31 December, 2014
Central Park First Stage / Migdal Arquitectos, © Ian Lizaranzu
© Ian Lizaranzu

© Ian Lizaranzu © Ian Lizaranzu © Ian Lizaranzu © Ian Lizaranzu +24

  • Architects

  • Location

    Via Magna, Huixquilucan, MEX, Mexico
  • Project Architects

    Jaime Varon, Abraham Metta, Alex Metta (Migdal Arquitectos)
  • Project Area

    55842.0 m2
  • Project Year

    2013
  • Photographs

School of Education, University of Zaragoza / Javier Maya + Estela Arteche Arquitectos

01:00 - 31 December, 2014
© Jorge Allende
© Jorge Allende
  • Architects

  • Location

    Zaragoza, Zaragoza, Spain
  • Architect in Charge

    Javier Maya, Estela Arteche
  • Project Year

    2013
  • Photographs

© Jorge Allende © Jorge Allende © Jorge Allende © Jorge Allende +32

MD House / Alric Galindez Arquitectos

01:00 - 31 December, 2014
MD House / Alric Galindez Arquitectos, Courtesy of Alric Galindez Arquitectos
Courtesy of Alric Galindez Arquitectos

© Albano García © Albano García Courtesy of Alric Galindez Arquitectos © Albano García +27

  • Architects

  • Location

    San Carlos de Bariloche, Argentina
  • Project Architects

    Arq. Santiago Alric, Arq. Carlos Galindez, Arq. Federico Lloveras
  • Project Area

    476.0 m2
  • Project Year

    2011
  • Photographs

Frank Gehry Presents Design for Venezuelan Music Center

00:00 - 31 December, 2014
Frank Gehry Presents Design for Venezuelan Music Center,  Frank Gehry presents the National Center for Social Action Through Music project
Frank Gehry presents the National Center for Social Action Through Music project

With Venezuelan President Nicolás Maduro in attendance, Frank Gehry presented the model for the future National Center for Social Action Through Music building in Lara state. The project is Gehry’s second in Latin America, following the recently inaugurated Biomuseo in Panamá

To be located in Barquisimeto, Venezuela’s fourth most populated city, the National Center for Social Action Through Music forms part of the National Network of Youth and Children’s Orchestras and Choirs of Venezuela, more commonly known as “El Sistema.” Founded in 1975 by orchestra director José Antonio Abreu, El Sistema is now funded by the government and provides musical training and education for children from impoverished backgrounds. The Adjkm-designed Simon Bolivar Complex for Social Action is also part of El Sistema.

Learn more about the project after the break. 

How Simple Earth Blocks Could Revolutionize Construction for the African Island of Pemba

01:00 - 31 December, 2014
How Simple Earth Blocks Could Revolutionize Construction for the African Island of Pemba, Local block maker Ali Cedric making blocks for sale in Pujini, Pemba Island. Image © Craig Norris
Local block maker Ali Cedric making blocks for sale in Pujini, Pemba Island. Image © Craig Norris

Pemba, a small Tanzanian island off of Africa's Eastern coast, is undergoing something of a construction boom. With half of the population aged under 30 and a culture in which a man must build a house before he can get married, a wave of new informal housing is sweeping the island. Historically, construction methods used by the islanders have been problematic: traditional wattle & daub construction typically survives for just 5-7 years; its replacement, bricks made of coral, not only require large amounts of energy to extract but have a devastating effect on the environment; and modern cement bricks most be imported at high costs.

Sensing an opportunity to help the islanders at a critical time in their development, Canadian NGO Community Forests International is promoting a solution that combines the economy and sustainability of wattle & daub with the durability of masonry: Interlocking Stabilized Compressed Earth Blocks (ISCEBs). Find out how this simple technology can help the island community after the break.

A029 / Camarim Arquitectos

01:00 - 31 December, 2014
A029 / Camarim Arquitectos, © Nelson Garrido
© Nelson Garrido

© Nelson Garrido © Nelson Garrido © Nelson Garrido © Nelson Garrido +16

A Church in Kyoto / Shigenori Uoya Architects and Associates

01:00 - 31 December, 2014
A Church in Kyoto / Shigenori Uoya Architects and Associates, © Nakamura Kai
© Nakamura Kai

© Nakamura Kai © Nakamura Kai © Nakamura Kai © Nakamura Kai +22

Drink Like an Architect: Pair your Cocktail with the Perfect Building

01:00 - 31 December, 2014
Drink Like an Architect: Pair your Cocktail with the Perfect Building, Seagram Building by Mies van der Rohe / Manhattan Cocktail. Image Courtesy of Kosmos Architects
Seagram Building by Mies van der Rohe / Manhattan Cocktail. Image Courtesy of Kosmos Architects

To paraphrase an old adage, "behind every great building is a great architect." According to Swiss-based Kosmos Architects, a less familiar version of this might say "beside every great building is a perfectly mixed cocktail." The firm has revealed a scientifically (un)proven link between alcohol and architecture: ramps, for instance, are often built at an inclination of five to seven degrees, a statistic that correlates to the alcoholic percentage of an average beer. Furthermore, a steep forty-degree roof incline designed to throw off snowfall matches the forty percent alcohol content of vodka used in Arctic climates to keep out the winter chill.

Kosmos Architects has published a series of twelve illustrated postcards, linking iconic buildings with their appropriate drink. A Manhattan for Mies, a Blue Blazer for Zumthor, and a Smoky Martini for Herzog & de Meuron all belong to the series 'Good Drinks & Good Buildings,' a booze-soaked comparison of architecture and alcohol, just in time to ring in 2015. 

What's inside SOM's martini? Find out after the break 

Villa Malaparte by Adalberto Libera and Curzio Malaparte / Negroni. Image Courtesy of Kosmos Architects Seagram Building by Mies van der Rohe / Manhattan Cocktail. Image Courtesy of Kosmos Architects Bruder Klaus Field Chapel by Peter Zumthor / Blue Blazer Cocktail. Image Courtesy of Kosmos Architects Palais Bulles by Antti Lovag / Bellini. Image Courtesy of Kosmos Architects +26

PURO Hotel / ASW Architekci Ankiersztajn Stankiewicz Wroński

01:00 - 31 December, 2014
PURO Hotel  / ASW Architekci Ankiersztajn Stankiewicz Wroński , © Fotoarchitektura Anna Gregorczyk
© Fotoarchitektura Anna Gregorczyk

© Fotoarchitektura Anna Gregorczyk © Fotoarchitektura Anna Gregorczyk © Fotoarchitektura Anna Gregorczyk © Fotoarchitektura Anna Gregorczyk +19

Pieres House / Graciana Oliveira

01:00 - 31 December, 2014
Pieres House / Graciana Oliveira, © João Morgado
© João Morgado

© João Morgado © João Morgado © João Morgado © João Morgado +25

Bingler and Pederson’s Critique of Architecture for the New York Times Sparks Controversy

00:00 - 31 December, 2014
Bingler and Pederson’s Critique of Architecture for the New York Times Sparks Controversy, Somewhat ironically, the New York Times' own building is designed by none other than "celebrity architect" Renzo Piano. Image © Ritu Manoj Jethani via Shutterstock
Somewhat ironically, the New York Times' own building is designed by none other than "celebrity architect" Renzo Piano. Image © Ritu Manoj Jethani via Shutterstock

Earlier this month the New York Times published an editorial written by Steven Bingler and Martin Pederson in which the two discuss how and why architects need to reevaluate the profession. The article centers on how today’s architecture can adequately meet the needs of its intended users without acknowledging their input and asks “at what point does architecture’s potential to improve human life become lost because of its inability to connect with actual humans?”

As with any commentary on the very nature of contemporary architecture, criticism abounds and has prompted a scathing response by Architect Magazine writer Aaron Betsky, who claims that the New York Times ought to be above such "know-nothing, cliché-ridden reviews of architecture" and ridicules certain excerpts of Bingler and Pederson's text,  saying "I am not making this up." Betsky takes the opportunity to argue instead that “Architecture... is either the dull affirmation of what we have, or it is an attempt to make our world better."

Read on after the break for more on the New York Times article and the opposing views

Eight Proposals Offer Scaled Down Solutions for Redeveloping St. Petersburg’s Pier

01:00 - 31 December, 2014
© Destination St. Pete Pier / St. Pete Design Group
© Destination St. Pete Pier / St. Pete Design Group

After public outcry rejected Michael Maltzan Architecture’s winning entry “The Lens,” which sought to replace St. Petersburg Pier with an ambitious sail-like concrete canopy and aquatic habitat, the fate of the structurally inapt inverted pyramid remained in limbo. Now, two years after the culmination of the original competition, the City of St. Petersburg, Florida, alongside the preservations of the Concerned Citizens of St. Pete, has selected eight scaled back proposals in hopes that one will provide a sensible solution that will both maximize the pier’s potential and satisfy the locals. 

Shortlisted competitors, including FR-EE / Fernando Romero EnterprisE, Alfonso Architects, and Rogers Partners, received a $30,000 stipend to submit these preliminary design concepts, complete with reports, renderings and cost estimates. Take a look at all eight proposals, after the break. 

Paulo Freire Library / 3C Arquitetura e Urbanismo

01:00 - 31 December, 2014
Paulo Freire Library / 3C Arquitetura e Urbanismo, © Saga Fotografia
© Saga Fotografia

© Saga Fotografia © Saga Fotografia © Saga Fotografia © Saga Fotografia +27

  • Architects

  • Location

    Parque Tecnologico Itaipu - Avenida Tancredo Neves, 6731 - Região Norte, Foz do Iguaçu - PR, Brazil
  • Architect in Charge

    Arq. Leonardo Damiani Poletti, Arq. Tiago Holzmann da Silva, Arq. Pedro Augusto Alves de Inda
  • Area

    2263.0 sqm
  • Project Year

    2014
  • Photographs

Infinita House / Natura Futura Arquitectura

01:00 - 31 December, 2014
Infinita House / Natura Futura Arquitectura, © José Gómez
© José Gómez

© José Gómez © José Gómez © José Gómez © José Gómez +16

  • Architects

  • Location

    Babahoyo, Ecuador
  • Project Architect

    José Fernando Gómez M
  • Collaborators

    Fausto Quiroz, Luis Roby F
  • Project Area

    160.0 m2
  • Project Year

    2014
  • Photographs

Oliver Wainwright's 2015 Wish List for British Cities

00:00 - 30 December, 2014
Oliver Wainwright's 2015 Wish List for British Cities, The housing crisis facing London has now become the primary concern of the capital's voters. Image © Flickr CC User mariusz kluzniak
The housing crisis facing London has now become the primary concern of the capital's voters. Image © Flickr CC User mariusz kluzniak

In the UK, urban issues are starting to see something of a renaissance, with problems such as the nation's housing shortage increasingly being subjected to scrutiny in ever more public arenas - in fact earlier this year housing overtook transport as the biggest concern among London voters. All of this means that 2015 will be "a golden opportunity to fix some of the worst city problems," according to the Guardian Cities, who have asked their architecture critic Oliver Wainwright to offer up a wishlist of positive changes that could benefit the nation's urban centres. From councils building more council housing to a tax on empty homes, Wainwright's four-point list offers straightforward policy advice that could truly transform the lives of British urbanites - and perhaps most promisingly, in three of these cases he explains how there are nascent movements already being made to bring his recommendations to fruition. You can read the full article here.