Farmhouse Renovation / Buero Philipp Moeller

© Benjamin A. Monn

Architects: Buero Philipp Moeller
Location: Moorenweis, Germany
Architects In Charge: Philipp Moeller, Spandri / Wiedemann, Elia Spandri
Area: 388.0 sqm
Year: 2013
Photographs: Benjamin A. Monn

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What If MOMA Had Expanded Underground (And Saved The American Folk Art Museum)?

Sculpture Garden, MOMA. Image © Andrew Moore, http://andrewlmoore.com/

In January of this year, the latest work by Smiljan Radic, the Chilean architect chosen to design the next Serpentine Pavilion, opened to public acclaim. The Museum of Pre-Columbian Art (Museo de Arte Precolombino), located in Santiago de Chile, is a restoration project that managed to sensitively maintain an original colonial structure  – all while increasing the space by about 70%.

Two days before the The Museum of Pre-Columbian Art opened, the Museum of Metropolitan Art (MOMA) in issued a statement that it would demolish the American Folk Art Museum (AFAM), designed by Tod Williams Billie Tsien Architects, in order to accomplish its envisioned expansion. Two weeks ago, preparations for demolition began.

Some background: MOMA had hired Diller Scofidio + Renfro a year earlier to design the expansion. The office asked for a period of six months to consider the possibilities of integrating the American Folk Art Museum into the design. After studying a vast array of options (unknown to the public) they were unable to accommodate MOMA’s shifting program needs with the AFAM building. They proposed a new circulation loop with additional gallery space and new program located where the AFAM is (was) located.

What appears here is not strictly a battle between an institution that wants to reflect the spirit of the time vs a building that is inherently specific to its place. It represents a lost design opportunity. What if the American Folk Art Museum had been considered an untouchable civic space in the city of New York, much like the The Museum of Pre-Columbian Art is for the city for Santiago? Then a whole new strategy for adaptive reuse would have emerged.

Vanke New City Center Sales Gallery / Spark Architects

© Shu He

Architects: Spark Architects
Location: , Jiangsu,
Project Director: Stephen Pimbley
Area: 800 sqm
Year: 2014
Photographs: Shu He

Courtesy of RIBA
Courtesy of RIBA

RIBA’s Future Trends Survey Reveals Small Drop in March

The Royal Institute of British Architects‘ (RIBA) latest Future Trends Survey indicates a small drop from February’s index, “down to +35 from its all-time high of +41.” Despite this, “confidence levels about an improvement in future workloads for architects remain very solid.” All types of practice size, ranging from those with fewer than 10 employees to those with over 50 staff, are “reporting positive balance figures.” The strongest future workload forecasts came from Scotland and the North of England, suggesting that “the recovery in confidence levels is now widespread across the UK and has spread beyond London and the South East.” Read on for more…

See ArchDaily's exclusive complete coverage of the Mies van der Rohe award

The Lightbox Gallery Woking / Marks Barfield Architects

© Geoff Banks

Architects: Marks Barfield Architects
Location: , Surrey, UK
Project Manager: Hornagold and Hills
Year: 2007
Photographs: Geoff Banks, Peter Cook, Morley Von Sternberg

The Berlage Archive: David Chipperfield (2001)

has teamed up with the The Berlage to provide exclusive access to their newly digitized archive of lectures. The Berlage is a postgraduate international institute where some of the world’s most renowned architects, thinkers, designers, photographers and other professionals come to share, exchange and critically reflect upon their ideas. Over the last 23 years, The Berlage has built up an extensive archive of seminal lectures. Thanks to this partnership we can now share them with you. ArchDaily is committed to providing inspiration and knowledge to architects all over the world, so please look forward to monthly publications of these lectures during the coming year.

In this 2001 lecture titled “Tradition and Invention,” David Chipperfield explains why the idea of continuity — as opposed to discontinuity — helps one design buildings. Though modern architecture has the desire to break with the past, Chipperfield embraces tradition and memory instead of modernistic pragmatism. 

Don’t miss the other lectures in The Berlage Archive series

National University Of Ireland, Galway | Science Research Building / Payette

© Warren Jagger

Architects: Payette
Location: , Ireland
Area: 86,112 sqft
Year: 2013
Photographs: Warren Jagger

Building Renovation at Cervantes Street / Antonio Altarriba

© Diego Opazo

Architects: Antonio Altarriba
Location: Calle Cervantes, Valencia, Badajoz,
Area: 391 sqm
Year: 2013
Photographs: Diego Opazo

Tammo Prinz Architects Propose Platonian Tower in Lima

Courtesy of Tammo Prinz Architects

Tammo Prinz’s competition entry for a new residential tower in Lima, , proposes the use of platonian bodies to generate dramatic interior and exterior spaces.

The concrete dodekaeder structure drives the form of the design whilst smaller cubic shapes are strategically placed within this to generate spaces for everyday living. The relationship between these two spatial qualities, of interior and exterior, reveals a series of unique spaces that can be used as an extension of the interior, or as a balcony-like outdoors area.

“Death in Venice” to Showcase Architecture’s Relationship with Mortality

Death in Venice will focus partially on the changing design of hospitals, places that many people die in every year. Image Courtesy of The Wellcome Library

This year’s Venice Architecture Biennale focuses on the fundamentals of architecture, and the theme of “.” Official exhibitions will highlight the basics of modern building, but one exhibition (unaffiliated with the official biennale) will take a unique approach to the term. Architects Alison Killing and Ania Molenda will devote their installation to the most fundamental quality of all: death.

Titled Death in Venice, this presentation will focus on how architecture has facilitated the act of dying during the past 100 years. All of the funding for the exhibition materials has been provided by the Fund for Creative Industries NL, but to transport the show to Venice, Killing and Molenda have started a Kickstarter campaign.

VIDEO: Paris in Motion

In this four-part, stop-motion series, Mayeul Akpovi presents a new perspective on the City of Lights. Filmed with manual camera movements and composed of more than 30,000 photographs, the videos enable a unique, otherwise-unattainable experience of ’ sleepless urban spaces by ceaselessly attenuating the passage of time.

Watch part one (above), and continue after the break for the remaining series…

Tele2 Arena / White arkitekter

© Åke E:son Lindman

Architects: White arkitekter
Location: Tele2 Arena, Arenaslingan 14, 121 77 Johanneshov, Sweden
Lead Architects: Fredrik Källström, Monica von Schmalensee
Year: 2013
Photographs: Åke E:son Lindman, Thomas Zaar

The Story of Maggie’s Centres: How 17 Architects Came to Tackle Cancer Care

Dundee, Scotland, 2003 by Frank Gehry / Courtesy of Maggie’s Centres. ImageThe third center was designed by Frank Gehry, a close friend of Maggie’s. “Frank gave us so much publicity, and allowed us to raise the money,” Jencks says. Each center is self-financed through donations.

Maggie’s Centres are the legacy of Margaret Keswick Jencks, a terminally ill woman who had the notion that cancer treatment environments and their results could be drastically improved through good design. Her vision was realized and continues to be realized today by numerous architects, including Frank Gehry, Zaha Hadid, and Snøhetta - just to name a few. Originally appearing in Metropolis Magazine as Living with Cancer,” this article by Samuel Medina features images of Maggie’s Centres around the world, taking a closer look at the organization’s roots and its continued success through the aid of architects.

It was May 1993, and writer and designer Margaret Keswick Jencks sat in a windowless corridor of a small Scottish hospital, dreading what would come next. The prognosis was bad—her cancer had returned—but the waiting, and the waiting room, were draining. Over the next two years until her death, she returned several times for chemo drips. In such neglected, thoughtless spaces, she wrote, patients like herself were left to “wilt” under the desiccating glare of fluorescent lights.

Wouldn’t it be better to have a private, light-filled space in which to await the results of the next bout of tests, or from which to contemplate, in silence, the findings? If architecture could demoralize patients—could “contribute to extreme and mental enervation,” as Keswick Jencks observed—could it not also prove restorative?

This is the central idea behind the experiment Keswick Jencks, or “Maggie,” started with her husband, architectural historian and theorist Charles Jencks, more than two decades ago. Their mission—to provide free, global care for cancer patients through great architecture—has since expanded to encompass 17 building projects (“Maggie’s Centres”), many of them by celebrated architects like Richard Rogers and Rem Koolhaas.

“Lebbeus Woods – Architect” Returns to NYC

Unified Urban Field. Image Courtesy of Estate of

This summer, the drawings, theories and works of architect Lebbeus Woods are headed to the city that Lebbeus considered home. After a five-month stay at SFMOMA, the exhibit “Lebbeus Woods – Architect” will be at the Drawing Center in , Manhattan until mid-June. The following story and overview of the exhibition, by Samuel Medina, originally appeared at Metropolis Magazine as “Coming Home”.

It’s all too biblical an irony that Lebbeus Woods—architect of war, catastrophe, and apocalyptic doom—died as strong winds, rain, and waves barreled down on Manhattan, his home for some 40-odd years. Woods passed the morning after Hurricane Sandy flooded Lower Manhattan, almost as if the prophet had succumbed to one of his turbulent visions. But this apocryphal reading is just one way to view Woods’s work, which, as often as it was concerned with annihilation, always dared to build in the bleakest of circumstances.

STM School of Technology and Management / MONTENEGRO Architects

© Fotografia de Arquitectura

Architects: MONTENEGRO Architects
Location: Beja, Portugal
Architect In Charge: Nuno Montenegro
Project Area: 11,600 sqm
Project Year: 2013
Photographs: FG+SG Fotografia de Arquitectura

Casa Lomas II / Paola Calzada Arquitectos

© Jaime Navarro Soto

Architects: Paola Calzada Arquitectos
Location: Federal District, Mexico
Area: 870 sqm
Year: 2013
Photographs: Jaime Navarro Soto

Brooklin House / Galeria Arquitetos

© Pedro Kok

Architects: Galeria Arquitetos
Location: São Paulo,
Architect In Charge: Fernanda Costa Neiva
Area: 166 sqm
Year: 2008
Photographs: Pedro Kok