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DAF: Designing for Adaptable Futures Proposal / Ravaglia, Rodrigues, Philot, Marx, Mendonça, Novaes

Designed by Fabiano Ravaglia, Liebert Rodrigues, Vinícius Philot, Fernanda Marx, Tiago Mendonça, and Karen Novaes, the DAF: Designing for Adaptable Futures competition proposal focuses on expansion and flexibility to create a new way of thinking about Brazilian social housing. Based on practices developed by the low-income residents of the social housings of Rio, the team objective is to formulate a set of strategies that could enable and encourage the expansion of housing but in a neatly way. By taking advantage of the existing structure and implantation and inside the constructive knowledge of the population, this will allow the enlargement when it suits them. More images and architects’ description after the break.

International Mock Firms Skyscraper Competition Proposal / ANDO | Andalucía Office

ANDO | Andalucía Office, composed by five young architects from the University of Seville, shared with us their 2nd prize winning proposal in the Fourth edition of the “International Mock Firms Skyscraper Competition” organized by Chicago Architecture Today. Their concept, which focused on versatility, let to their NODO project, a tower over 550 meters in Beijing. The most innovative architectural idea of the project is based on the possibility of a constantly changing skyscraper. It is all about developing a mutant vertical city building possibility, which answers to its time, place and inhabitants requirements. More images and architects’ description after the break.

Tel Aviv Fastlane Control and Coordination Center / Amir Mann-Ami Shinar Architects

  • Architects: Amir Mann-Ami Shinar Architects and Planners
  • Location: Tel Aviv, Israel
  • Partner In Charge: Amir Mann
  • Design Team: Asaf Mann
  • Project Manager: Shafir Engineering Ltd.
  • Area: 2200.0 sqm
  • Project Year: 2009
  • Photographs: Gal Deren

© Gal Deren © Gal Deren © Gal Deren © Gal Deren

PCC Newberg Center / Hennebery Eddy Architects

  • Architects: Hennebery Eddy Architects
  • Location: 135 Werth Blvd, Newberg, OR 97132, USA
  • Project Architect: Erica Dunn
  • Design Team: Timothy R. Eddy
  • Project Manager: Doug Reimer
  • Area: 13800.0 ft2
  • Project Year: 2010
  • Photographs: Stephen Miller, Nic Lehoux

© Stephen Miller © Stephen Miller © Nic Lehoux © Stephen Miller

Villa P / Architektonicke Studio Atrium

  • Architects: Architektonicke Studio Atrium
  • Location: Karlovarská, 04011 Košice - Západ, Slovakia
  • Area: 350.0 sqm
  • Project Year: 2012
  • Photographs: Courtesy of Architektonicke Studio Atrium

Courtesy of Architektonicke Studio Atrium Courtesy of Architektonicke Studio Atrium Courtesy of Architektonicke Studio Atrium Courtesy of Architektonicke Studio Atrium

“Line, Surface, Space“ Installation / Kawahara Krause Architects

The “Line, surface, space“ installation, by Kawahara Krause Architects, is displayed as part of the architectural triennale in Hamburg this summer. Erected on the plan of three interlocking twisted squares of different sizes, the threads of the outer square suggest the edges of an imaginary space, while the more densely arranged threads towards the middle seem to create surfaces. A fragile structure of threads stretching from floor to ceiling seems to dissolve in space and recompose to ever new appearances. Varying between transparent and closed surfaces, the spatial perception changes with each step taken through the installation. More images and architects’ description after the break.

Question: What would Archigram have done for the 2012 London Olympics?

Archigram Instant City
Archigram Instant City

Share your creative responses in the comment section below:

Looking for a Frank Lloyd Wright? You Have 30 Days...

The David S. Wright Home in Arcadia, Arizona. Photo via Curbd LA.
The David S. Wright Home in Arcadia, Arizona. Photo via Curbd LA.

According to a local Arizona news channel, a home Frank Lloyd Wright designed for his son, David S. Wright, is on the chopping block. The house, located in Arcadia, Arizona, was purchased earlier this year by developers who plan to demolish the site – unless a buyer steps forth within the next 30 days. The circular house is rather unique for Wright as an architect, and holds special significance for the Wright family. As Frank’s great-granddaughter, Anne Wright Levi, who often visited the house growing up, shared with 3TV: “This house is a piece of history, it represents a piece of Arizona that Frank Lloyd Wright loved so much. This house was the community before the community was here, and it should be saved.” So, how much will this piece of history cost you? Well, the developers bought the property for $1.8 million, so you can expect to dish out at least the same. But what’s a couple million when it comes to preserving a piece of architectural history? Story via Yahoo News

Does a Good Cause Inevitably Lead to Good Architecture?

The Ronald McDonald House near Lurie's Children's Hospital, in Chicago. Photo for the Chicago Tribune by Michael Tercha.
The Ronald McDonald House near Lurie's Children's Hospital, in Chicago. Photo for the Chicago Tribune by Michael Tercha.

In his architectural review of the Ronald McDonald House, a home for families with children at the nearby Children’s Hospital, Blair Kamin came up against a moral dilemna: How can you criticize a building whose cause is so much better than its architectural form?  As Kamin says: “Criticize anything in such building and you’re bound to sound insensitive, as if aesthetics mattered more than cancer. Yet all urban buildings, no matter what their purpose, are obliged to appeal to a broader constituency — namely, the people who pass by them every day.  To say [it's no prize-winning work of architecture] isn’t to deny the good that’s done there. It’s to wish that the building excelled equally at raising the quality of the cityscape.” Ultimately, Kamin’s quandary comes down to a central architectural question: to what extent must a building, even one which serves a higher purpose, improve the context in which it finds itself? At the end of the day – are form and function equally important? Let us know your thoughts in the comments below. Story via ArchRecord and the Chicago Tribune

'Schaustelle' Temporary Pavilion / J. Mayer H. Architects

Courtesy of J. Mayer H. Architects
Courtesy of J. Mayer H. Architects

Designed by J. MAYER H., the ‘Schaustelle’ or ‘show site’ will be a temporary pavilion and platform for the four collections housed at the Pinakothek der Moderne in Munich, Germany. The temporary closure has been seen as an opportunity that will give rise to a makeshift exhibition building – the Schaustelle. Set up to hold exhibitions, workshops, talks, performances, film screenings and video installations, and much more, the scheme has been initiated by the Pinakothek der Moderne Foundation. More images and architects’ description after the break.

How (Not) to Host The Olympics (Part III)

How (Not) To Host the Olympics (Part II)

"We Will Not Leave"  Words painted on a wall in a neighborhood slated for demolition. Despite some protests, Beijing citizens were powerless to stop the demolition of their homes in the name of the Olympics. Photo via Flickr CC User theroadisthegoal
"We Will Not Leave" Words painted on a wall in a neighborhood slated for demolition. Despite some protests, Beijing citizens were powerless to stop the demolition of their homes in the name of the Olympics. Photo via Flickr CC User theroadisthegoal

If you remember nothing else from  Part I of our Olympic City Guide, Your Very Own Guide to Successfully Hosting the Olympic Games, make it the GOLDEN RULE: “The best thing to do if you’re bidding for the Olympics, Is to Not Get the Olympics.” As we explained in Part I, this take-it-or-leave-it mentality is key to Olympic success. See the Olympics as the Games, and, come autumn, you’ll find your city littered with resource-guzzling, empty stadiums. See the Olympics as an excuse to get your plans for Urban Renewal into hyper-drive, and you’ll get the gold: a publicity-hogging, urban makeover that will continue to make you profit years after the Olympic circus has packed up and gone home. But Olympic legacy doesn’t just come down to dollars and cents. It often means making a very real socio-cultural impact. Which leads us to our second set of Dos and Donts, starting with DON’T: Be Shady. And yes, we’re looking at you Beijing… Keep reading for the Dos and Donts of Olympic Hostdom, after the break…

When Buildings Build Themselves

In the second part of our popular series “How 3D Printing Will Change Our World,” we took a look at the work of Neri Oxman, an MIT professor 3D Printing fantastic, nature-inspired designs that actually respond to their environment.

But an MIT colleague and fellow architect, Skylar Tibbits, and his partner Arthur Olson of the Scripps Research Institute, are taking Oxman’s thesis one step further. Similarly inspired by natural properties that allow for interaction with the environment, these two are trying to figure out: ”Could buildings one day build themselves?”

The two recently exhibited the Autodesk-sponsored BioMolecular Self-Assembly at TED Global 2012 in Edinburgh, Scotland. The project? Take the basic ingredients for molecular assembly,  put them in individual flasks, and shake well. The result? The independent parts actually find each other and self-assemble various structures themselves.

It looks pretty small-scale right now, but Olson and Tibbits have already applied self-assembly technologies for larger installations – which means that buildings might not be so far off…

Find out how this technology could create buildings, and check out more photos/video, after the break… 

How (Not) To Host The Olympics

So – you want to be an Olympic City do you? Well let’s hope you’re going for gold. First of all, the Olympic bid is no child’s play. You can spend millions just to prove (often unsuccessfully) your worthiness. And, if you do get the bid, who’s to say that your Olympic Dreams won’t be dashed by elephantine debts, colossal inefficiencies, and your own citizenry’s open animosity? Everyone may think the Olympics is all guts and glory, but frankly, the truth is far more complex. Which is why we’ve come up with a User’s Guide – the Do’s and Dont’s to Hosting Your Very Own Olympics. We’ll begin with the GOLDEN RULE: “The best thing to do if you’re bidding for the Olympics, Is to Not Get the Olympics.” Want to know the Cardinal Sins of Olympic Hostdom? Keep reading after the break…

Sugar Hill Breaks Ground / Adjaye Associates

Two years ago, we featured David Adjaye’s affordable housing project for Harlem which was designed as a way to integrate urban and cultural offerings alongside 120+ units of affordable housing.  Construction began on the building yesterday, and was celebrated by a ceremony attended by New York City Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg.  “Sugar Hill represents a new social engagement, which is at the heart of my practice. It is a symbol of  regeneration for the community of Harlem that will integrate housing with a cultural and educational  element – this is a real reinvention of the traditional model and I am thrilled to see the project break ground,” explained Adjaye. More about the project after the break.

‘Foster + Partners: the Art of Architecture’ Exhibition

Courtesy of Foster + Partners
Courtesy of Foster + Partners

Taking place at the Shanghai Oil Painting and Sculpture Institute (SPSI), from July 25 to August 25, the ‘Foster + Partners: the Art of Architecture’ exhibition is the first major survey of the studio’s work to be held in China. It reveals details of a number of new projects underway in the region, including headquarters for Citic Bank in Hangzhou, a new tower in Nanjing and the Vantone development in Shanghai. It is also an opportunity to see the original models and sketches for high-profile completed buildings, such as Beijing International Airport, the Millau Viaduct in France, Hearst Tower in New York and the Swiss Re headquarters in London. More architects’ description after the break.

Shelter International Architectural Design Competition

With this year’s theme being “Big Tree Paradigm” Akihisa Hirata, Shelter Corporation of Japan is inviting under-graduate or post-graduate students at universities or at tertiary institutions (including: junior colleges, colleges of technology, and other relevant vocational schools) as of November 17, 2012, to participate in their annual Student Architectural design Competition. Participants are challenged to design a house that has an attractive quality that is somehow similar to the attractiveness of big trees. It is not necessary that the house imitates the shape of trees. Rather, it is good if the idea starts from the attractiveness of big trees and develops into an unpredictable outcome – the form does not need to look like a tree at all. Submissions are due no later than September 28. To register and for more information, please visit here.  

AD Round Up: Classics Part V /

  • Photographs: Unknown photographer

© Unknown photographer © Unknown photographer © Unknown photographer © Unknown photographer