Seaside House / Gray Organschi Architecture

©

Architects: Gray Organschi Architecture
Location: , NY, USA
Area: 3000.0 ft2
Year: 2011
Photographs: Gray Organschi Architecture

Hangzhou Xixi National Wetland / Sunlay

Courtesy of

Architects: Sunlay
Location: , Zhejiang, China
Design Team: Zhang Hua, Fan Li
Area: 4,722 sqm
Year: 2012
Photographs: Courtesy of Sunlay

Plaza Baquerizo Moreno / Juan Xavier Chávez

© Juan Alberto Andrade

Architects: Juan Xavier Chávez
Location: ,
Area: 8,688 sqm
Year: 2012
Photographs: Juan Alberto Andrade

The Screen / Li Xiaodong Atelier

© Martijn de Geus

Architects: Li Xiaodong Atelier
Location: , Zhejiang, China
Architect In Charge: Li Xiaodong
Design Team: Martijn de Geus, Jerry Hau, Ying Xin, Renske van Dam
Cost: 8 million RMB
Area: 600 sqm
Year: 2013
Photographs: Martijn de Geus

118 Subsidized Dwellings, Offices, Retail Spaces and Garage / Amann Canovas Maruri

© David Frutos

Architects: Amann Canovas Maruri
Location: Plaza de la Hispanidad, , Madrid,
Project Directors: Atxu Amann, Andrés Cánovas, Nicolás Maruri
Area: 20,000 sqm
Year: 2012
Photographs: David Frutos

Herzog & de Meuron to Design One of Denmark’s Largest Hospitals

© Herzog & de Meuron

Herzog & de Meuron and Vilhelm Lauritzen Architects have been announced as winners of an international competition to design one of ’s largest hospitals: Nyt Hospital Nordsjælland. Selected ahead of six other practices, including BIG and C.F. Møller, Herzog & de Meuron’s nature-inspired proposal will provide the New North Zealand Hospital with a 124,000 square meter facility that serves 24 medical departments and provides over 660 beds. 

“The hospital organically reaches out into the wide landscape. Simultaneously its soft, flowing form binds the many components of the hospital,” described the architects. “It is a low building that fosters exchange between staff and patients, and it has a human scale despite its very large size.”

Trump Cadde / GAD

© Alp Eren

Architects: GAD
Location: Beyoğlu/Istanbul Province,
Architectural Project & Design: Gokhan Avcioglu &
Project Team: Jonas Kirsch, Derya Arpaç, Tahsin İnanici, Gökşen Güngör
Area: 1,040 sqm
Year: 2014
Photographs: Alp Eren

Round-Up: Floating Architecture

Courtesy of NLÉ architects

If a Ted Talk by Koen Olthius, this article in the Guardian, and Brazil‘s pioneering plan (currently in the pipeline) are anything to go by, now may be the time for futuristic, floating cities to become a reality. With that in mind, we’ve taken the opportunity to gather the best examples of floating architecture already constructed, including: a low-cost floating school in Lagos; an entire floating neighborhood in Ijburg, Amsterdam; a trio of cultural buildings in Seoul‘s Han River; a set of hotels in a remote area of Cisnes, Chile; and finally a beautiful home on Lake Union in Seattle. Enjoy!

Little House / TANK

Courtesy of

Architects: TANK
Location: Arras,
Area: 110 sqm
Year: 2008
Photographs: Courtesy of TANK

In Detail: Chipperfield’s Nobel Centre for Stockholm

View towards Nybrokajen. Image ©

As we announced earlier, David Chipperfield Architects’ modest proposal for the Nobel Center’s new home in Stockholm has been announced as the winning submission of the Nobel Foundation’s prestigious international competition. Lauded by the jury for its “lightness and openness,” Chipperfield envisioned the glass and stone proposal to “convey dignity” and embody the ideals of the Nobel Prize so it may serve as inspiration for generations to come.

Detailed drawings, images and quotes from the architect, after the break… 

Business Incubator / h2o architectes

© Stéphane Chalmeau

Architects: h2o architectes
Location: 67 Rue du Canal, 27500 ,
Area: 1500.0 sqm
Year: 2013
Photographs: Stéphane Chalmeau, Julien Attard

MVRDV Exhibits Furniture Series “Vertical Village” at Milan Design Week

Vertical Village in Milan. Image © Gili Merin

, in cooperation with the Belgian furniture label Sixinch, have designed a playful furniture series that imagines an antidote to the sprawled, generic urban growth of East Asia’s mega-cities. Each of the 77 large cushions in “Vertical Village” – currently on display at Milan’s Design Week – take the form of small, densely-packed houses, colorful alternatives to the horizontal, block-like residential buildings that currently dot East Asia’s skylines. From the exhibition:

“The Vertical Village – observation of the uncontrolled growth of Asian cities, which has lead to the disappearance of urban villages on a human scale, prompts the designers to develop a livable city model that promotes upward growth: a vertical village composed of small residential nuclei that ensure human relationships and, at the same time, leave room for green areas and gathering places. The installation is composed of 77 large cushions in the form of small houses, all different.”

See ArchDaily's exclusive coverage of the Pritzker Prize

The Pritzker-Profit Connection: Shigeru Ban’s Works Gaining Value in NYC

Image © Karsten Moran for The Times

A recent article from The New York Times confirms something we’ve all long-suspected. A Pritzker translates into big bucks. Demand for ’s Manhattan buildings has soared since his awarding of the prize. The New York Times reports that page views of the Metal Shutter Houses, for example, have quadrupled on the listings site Streeteasy.com. Why? The Pritzker name carries weight:

“In this second age of high-flying real estate, brand-name architecture and globe-trotting wealth, the identity of a designer has taken on ever-increasing value to ensure that a project’s multimillion-dollar homes stand out. Anyone can install waterfall showers and Wolf ranges. A Pritzker is harder to come by.”

“Though Mr. Ban’s Pritzker could make it costlier to hire him in the future, some developers find a laureate worth the expense. ‘You can save a lot on plans, because you only have to change 10 percent of the project, instead of 90 percent; the vision is just so complete,’ the developer Aby Rosen said. ‘And you also save a ton on the marketing. People want to write about these Pritzker projects, and an article is way better than an ad.’”

But what does it mean when architecture – particularly the architecture of a socially-conscious designer like Ban – becomes a brand-name item? As Laura Ilonemi writes, “the Pritzker Prize begins to perpetuate an environment that is unhealthy to architecture: too strong a divide is created between winners and non-winners of the same calibre. [...] Sought-after commissions, and other opportunities perhaps better suited to other candidates, may well go to Pritzker Prize winners, helping to reinforce the trend of ‘designer buildings’ in much the same vein as designer label consumer goods and products. ”

As one real estate agent, representing a resident of the Metal Shutter Houses, put it: “It’s like buying an Hermès bag but better.” Is, in the end, the Pritzker nothing more than a branding tool? Should it be more? Let us know your thoughts in the comments below.

Museum of the Fangshang Geopark / BIAD

© Chaoying Yang

Architects: BIAD
Location: Fangshan, Beijing,
Architects In Charge: Yinong Li,Yaolei Sun
Design Institute: Beijing Institute of Architectural Design, 6A8 Studio
Area: 10,000 sqm
Year: 2009
Photographs: Chaoying Yang

David Chipperfield Architects To Design Nobel Prize’s New Home

David Chipperfield Architects has won the prestigious competition to design Stockholm’s new Nobel Centre in the Blasieholmsudden peninsula. The firm’s proposal – named Nobelhuset - beat out those by Swedish shortlisters Wingårdhs Arkitektkontor and Johan Celsing Arkitektkontor; the three had been selected from 12 high-profile entries (including the likes of BIG, OMA, and SANAA) in November of last year.

The jury unanimously chose Chipperfield’s design for the new headquarters, which will include exhibition spaces, meeting rooms, a library, restaurant, shop and a large auditorium where the annual Prize award ceremony will take place. Jury chair and Foundation executive director Lars Heikensten noted: “The jury finds the lightness and openness of the building very appealing and consistent with the Foundation’s explicit ambition to create an open and welcoming Centre for the general public.”

The Centre is planned to open in 2018. More images of Chipperfield’s winning proposal here.

VIDEO: In Boston, Reclaiming the Craft of Brick

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Our friends at Mecanoo have shared a fascinating mini-documentary exploring the complex brickwork on display in their latest project in Boston’s Dudley Square, the Dudley Municipal Center(nearing completion). Called “Boston Bricks with a Dutch Touch,” this documentary features interviews with everyone involved in the project – from workers to architects – and focuses on the difficulty of using in this elaborate manner. Enjoy the video above and check out some fantastic images after the break.

Exhibition: In Between Projects / PRODUCTORA

Exhibition: In Between Projects / PRODUCTORA

The architectural firm PRODUCTORA, based in Mexico City, is presenting 9 unbuilt projects that have a clear relation to geometry and mathematical composition. Large-scale models, made in collaboration with students at Woodbury University are presented together with black and white CAD drawing that clarify the main conceptual aspect of the building.

See ArchDaily's exclusive coverage of the Pritzker Prize

Happy Birthday Jørn Utzon

Jørn Utzon in front of the Opera House during construction, 1965. Image Courtesy of Keystone/Getty Images

Pritzker Prize winning architect Jørn Utzon, who died in 2008 aged 90, was the relatively unknown Dane who, on the 29th January 1957, was announced as the winner of the ‘International competition for a national opera house at Bennelong Point, Sydney’. When speaking about this iconic building, Louis Kahn stated that:

The sun did not know how beautiful its light was, until it was reflected off this building.

Unfortunately, Utzon never saw the Sydney Opera House, his most popular work, completed. Learn of his fascinating story, after the break.