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The 14 Stories Behind the 2015 Building of the Year Award Winners

With our annual Building of the Year Awards, over 30,000 readers narrowed down over 3,000 projects, selecting just 14 as the best examples of architecture that ArchDaily has published in the past year. The results have been celebrated and widely shared, of course, usually in the form of images of each project. But what is often forgotten in this flurry of image sharing is that every one of these 14 projects has a backstory of significance which adds to our understanding of their architectural quality.

Some of these projects are intelligent responses to pressing social issues, others are twists on a well-established typology. Others still are simply supreme examples of architectural dexterity. In order that we don't forget the tremendous amount of effort that goes into creating each of these architectural masterpieces, continue reading after the break for the 14 stories that defined this year's Building of the Year Awards.

Winners of the 2015 Building of the Year Awards

After two weeks of nominations and voting, we are pleased to present the winners of the 2015 ArchDaily Building of the Year Awards. As a peer-based, crowdsourced architecture award, the results shown here represent the collective intelligence of 31,000 architects, filtering the best architecture from over 3,000 projects featured on ArchDaily during the past year.

The winning buildings represent a diverse group of architects, from Pritzker Prize winners such as Álvaro Siza, Herzog & de Meuron and Shigeru Ban, to up-and-coming practices such as EFFEKT and Building which have so far been less widely covered by the media. In many cases their designs may be the most visually striking, but each also approaches its context and program in a unique way to solve social, environmental or economic challenges in communities around the world. By publishing them on ArchDaily, these buildings have helped us to impart inspiration and knowledge to architects around the world, furthering our mission. So to everyone who participated by either nominating or voting for a shortlisted project, thank you for being a part of this amazing process, where the voices of architects from all over the world unite to form one strong, intelligent, forward-thinking message.

Inside SeARCH's Utopian Hobbit Hole at the Architecture Biennale Rotterdam

Windowless, sparse, and connected to nature — this is how architecture and urban design firm SeARCH envisions the home of the future. In their new project "Yourtopia," they challenge stereotypical ideas about what a home should be and demonstrate an awareness about our relationship with our environment. This article originally published on Metropolis Magazine investigates the home's minimal design and construction process.

Our homes shield us from distractions so that we may cultivate our own interests and, in the process, sense of selves. Dutch architecture firm SeARCH has taken this idea to the extreme with “Yourtopia”, a temporary refuge that radically reconsiders what a home can be.

More on Yourtopia's radical living environment after the break

Kop van Kessel-Lo Leuven / SeARCH + AR-TE

  • Architects: SeARCH, AR-TE
  • Location: Leuven, Belgium
  • Client: CIP
  • Area: 75000.0 sqm
  • Project Year: 2013
  • Photographs: Hennie Raaymakers

© Hennie Raaymakers © Hennie Raaymakers © Hennie Raaymakers © Hennie Raaymakers

The Iceberg / CEBRA + JDS + SeARCH + Louis Paillard Architects

© Mikkel Frost © Mikkel Frost © Mikkel Frost © Mikkel Frost

SeARCH Wins Urban Renewal Competition in Stockholm

SeARCH has won an invited, international competition for the urban renewal of Marievik. Their winning proposal, STA(CK)HOLM plans to transform an area along one of central Stockholm’s main access roads, opposite the island of Södermalm and facing a new bridge by Norman Foster, into a futuristic sustainable neighborhood. 

Update: Iceberg / CEBRA + JDS + SeARCH + Louis Paillard

We love seeing a project through fruition, and after being introduced to the collaborative vision of the Iceberg for Arhus, Denmark, we were anxiously awaiting its construction.  As we have previously shared, the Iceberg, or “Isbjerget” in Danish, was designed as an iconic waterfront marker to invigorate the harbor front’s transformation from a sole industrial entity to a residential and commercial hub.   Construction is swiftly progressing on the four building block, and earlier this week, the team enjoyed the project’s “topping out” ceremony. More about the Iceberg after the break.

In Progress: Iceberg / CEBRA + JDS + SeARCH + Louis Paillard

Favrholm Conference Center / SeARCH

  • Architects: SeARCH
  • Location: Olof Palmes Gade 6, 2100 Copenhagen, Denmark
  • Architects: SeARCH bv
  • Design Team: Bjarne Mastenbroek, Kathrin Hanf met Remco Wieringa en Paul Stavert, Geurt Holdijk, Laura Alvarez, Elke Demyttenaere, David Gianotten
  • Client: Novo Nordisk
  • Project Year: 2011
  • Photographs: Iwan Baan

© Iwan Baan © Iwan Baan © Iwan Baan © Iwan Baan

Iceberg / CEBRA + JDS + SeARCH + Louis Paillard

One of our favorites, CEBRA, (and their collaboraters JDS, SeARCH and Louis Paillard) shared their latest winning competition entry.  Situated in Aarhus, Denmark, right in front of the harbor, the 21.500 m2 project features mixed dwellings types and commercial space.   The project receives its jagged heights to allow better views toward the ocean and better daylight conditions, and the tops and bottoms are shifted so that views between the volumes become possible.  This breakdown of the mass creates the potential for an “iconic” building for the harbor area, and one that, due to its form, creates its own skyline within itself.  There’s just something about the Danes’ approaches, like BIG + Cebra, where they tackle simple realities, such as light and views, and allow their whole building to respond them in an unconventional and dynamic way.

More images, diagrams and more information about the winning design after the break.

Rotterdam City Hall Extension entries

SeARCH
SeARCH

In a previous post I told you about the competition held by the City of Rotterdam for a mixed used building to accommodate public services and a residential program, and  we presented OMA’s entry. After the break, find the entries by the five finalists: Claus en Kaan Architecten, Mecanoo Architecten, Meyer en van Schooten Architecten, OMA and SeARCH.