We’ve built you a better ArchDaily. Learn more and let us know what you think. Send us your feedback »

Rintala Eggertsson Architects

BROWSE ALL FROM THIS FIRM HERE

MM1 - Exhibition Room For Contemporary Art / Rintala Eggertsson Architects

© Are Carlsen © Are Carlsen © Are Carlsen © Are Carlsen

Bus Stop Kressbad / Rintala Eggertsson Architects

  • Architects: Rintala Eggertsson Architects
  • Location: Krumbach, 6942 Krumbach, Austria
  • Architects in Charge: Sami Rintala, Dagur Eggertsson, Vibeke Jenssen
  • Photographs: Yuri Palmin

© Yuri Palmin © Yuri Palmin © Yuri Palmin © Yuri Palmin

A New Festival that Celebrates the Architecture of the Arctic Circle

Last weekend saw the opening of a new cultural festival on Sandhornøy, a small Norwegian island within the Arctic Circle. Centered around three traditionally-inspired structures by Rintala Eggertsson ArchitectsSALT is a celebration of the history and culture of Arctic communities - and while the structures of the Norwegian festival will remain in place for a full year, the festival itself plans to tour the northern regions of the globe, with new locally specific installations at each locale. Find out more about the festival in after the break, in this post originally published on Metropolis Magazine.

SALT Festival Installations / Rintala Eggertsson Architects

  • Architects: Rintala Eggertsson Architects
  • Location: Fylkesveg 478 430, 8130 Sandhornøy, Norway
  • Project Year: 2014
  • Photographs: Gunnar Holmstad, Marte Antonsen

© Gunnar Holmstad © Marte Antonsen © Gunnar Holmstad © Gunnar Holmstad

BUS:STOP Unveils 7 Unusual Bus Shelters by World Class Architects

A year in the making, Krumbach in Austria has unveiled seven eye-catching bus shelters which have turned the world's gaze on the tiny village. Designed by internationally renowned architects such as Wang Shu, Sou Fujimoto and Smiljan Radic, who worked in collaboration with local architects and craftsmen, the whimsical structures will put the village of 1000 residents on the map.

Curator Dietmar Steiner praised the commitment of those involved, saying "the entire project succeeded because it was supported in the most generous fashion by more than 200 people." This included the architects, who took up their projects for little more than a free holiday in the area and the chance to engage in an unusual challenge. However, BUS:STOP was not merely a vanity project: Verena Konrad, Director of vai Vorarlberger Architektur Institut, noted that the project was important for "the successful connection of infrastructure and mobility for the rural area."

See images of all 7 shelters after the break

Smiljan Radic’s BUS:STOP design. Image © Yuri Palmin Architecten de Vylder Vinck Taillieu’s BUS:STOP design. Image © Yuri Palmin Rintala Eggertsson Architect’s BUS:STOP design. Image © Yuri Palmin Amateur Architecture Studio’s BUS:STOP design. Image © Yuri Palmin

Big Ideas, Small Buildings: Some of Architecture's Best, Tiny Projects

This post was originally published in The Architectural Review as "Size Doesn't Matter: Big Ideas for Small Buildings."

Taschen’s latest volume draws together the architectural underdogs that, despite their minute, whimsical forms, are setting bold new trends for design.

When economies falter and construction halts, what happens to architecture? Rather than indulgent, personal projects, the need for small and perfectly formed spaces is becoming an economic necessity, pushing designers to go further with less. In their new volume Small: Architecture Now!, Taschen have drawn together the teahouses, cabins, saunas and dollhouses that set the trends for the small, sensitive and sustainable, with designers ranging from Pritzker Laureate Shigeru Ban to emerging young practices.

Terunobu Fujimori, Beetle's House, Victoria & Albert Museum, London, UK. Image Courtesy of Victoria and Albert Museum, London/TASCHEN Jorge Gracia, Endémico Resguardo Silvestre, Valle de Guadalupe, Ensenada, Mexico. Image © Undine Pröhl/TASCHEN Kota Mizuishi, Riverside House Suginami, Tokyo, Japan. Image © Hiroshi Tanigawa/TASCHEN Olson Kundig, Delta Shelter, Mazama, Washington, USA. Image © Olson Sundberg Kundig Allen Architects/TASCHEN

Barnetraakk / TYIN Tegnestue + Rintala Eggertsson Architects

  • Architects: TYIN Tegnestue, Rintala Eggertsson Architects
  • Location: Oppland, Norway
  • Built by: Rintala Eggertsson Architects, TYIN Tegnestue
  • Planning Team: Yashar Hanstad, Andreas G. Gjertsen, Sami Rintala, Dagur Eggertsson, Vibeke Jenssen and children at the Trintom Elementary School
  • Area: 20.0 sqm
  • Project Year: 2013
  • Photographs: Pasi Aalto

© Pasi Aalto © Pasi Aalto © Pasi Aalto © Pasi Aalto

BoxHome / Rintala Eggertsson Architects

Courtesy of Rintala Eggertsson Architects
Courtesy of Rintala Eggertsson Architects
  • Architects: Rintala Eggertsson Architects
  • Location: Oslo, Norway
  • Work Group: Sami Rintala, Dagur Eggertson, John Roger Holte, Julian Fors
  • Area: 19.0 sqm
  • Project Year: 2007
  • Photographs: Courtesy of Rintala Eggertsson Architects, Ivan Brodey

© Ivan Brodey Courtesy of Rintala Eggertsson Architects © Ivan Brodey © Ivan Brodey

World Famous Architects Design Bus Stops for Tiny Austrian Village

Krumbach, a small Austrian village of 1000 inhabitants, is not the place you'd expect to find structures from a variety of architecture's biggest names. But thanks to Verein Kultur Krumbach, a new association dedicated to encouraging culture in the village, that's exactly what's happening, with seven international architecture firms agreeing to design bus stops for Krumbach.

Read after the break to find out more about the seven designs.

BUS:STOP Krumbach: 7 architects, 7 buildings, 7 statements

BUS:STOP Krumbach is a recently initiated project in the Bregenzerwald region of Austria that will bring together seven well-known architecture offices from around the world, pair them up with seven local architects and allow the pairs to work together on the design of seven new bus shelters in the town of Krumbach. A true collaboration between tradition and innovation, national and international, BUS:STOP hopes to create a series of small and functional buildings with their own unique characters that tell not only the story of these architects, but also of this special region.

For the list of participating offices and to learn more about BUS:STOP, read on. 

Venice Biennale 2012: VOID / Rintala Eggertsson Architects

In Western thinking the notion of void, or emptiness is a usually considered a negative state of affairs, absence or lack of something. As an existential term emptiness, coupled with our contemporary condition with unforeseen wealth, is associated with the sensation of uneasiness and alienation in the midst of our plenty. This spiritual emptiness may be filled on its surface with busyness and entertainment, cultural hipness and formal styles. This obsessive behavior or fear of emptiness, well exploited by commercial interests, is a trap that enforces us to produce, to consume and to fill the seemingly meaningless gaps, rather than allowing things to evolve in a natural and sustainable way.

Element house / Rintala Eggertsson Architects

  • Architects: Rintala Eggertsson Architects
  • Location: Anyang-si, Gyeonggi-do, South Korea
  • Architect: Sami Rintala
  • Landscape Architects: Eedo Space Architectural Design, Seúl, Republic of Korea
  • Collaborators: John Roger Holte, Artist, Norway; Finnforest, Wood
  • Materials: Steel, Wood, Concrete, Gravel, Glass
  • Construction: October-December 2005
  • Client: Anyang City / Public Art Project
  • Area: 72.0 sqm
  • Project Year: 2006
  • Photographs: Park Wan Soon, Emil Goh

© Park Wan Soon, Emil Goh © Park Wan Soon, Emil Goh © Park Wan Soon, Emil Goh © Park Wan Soon, Emil Goh

Arboretum / Rintala Eggertsson Architects

  • Architects: Rintala Eggertsson Architects
  • Location: Øverbyvegen88-104, 2825 Gjøvik, Norway
  • Architects: Rintala Eggertsson Architects - Vibeke Jenssen, Kaori Watanabe, Sami Rintala and Dagur Eggertsson
  • Design Team: Dagur Eggertsson, Julian Fors, Fabricio Ferreira Fernandes, Matthew Donnachie, Sölvi Magnússon, Kaori Watanabe and Vibeke Jenssen
  • Curator: Public Art Norway (KORO), Mette Kvandal and Per Henrik Svalastog
  • Client: Public Construction and Property Management (Statsbygg), Tommy Pedersen
  • User: Gjøvik Care Centre
  • User Representative: Norwegian Directorate for Children, Youth and Family Affairs (Bufetat), Anne-Beth Brekke, Geir Rune Nyhus and Kai Børresen
  • Photographs: Pasi Aalto

© Pasi Aalto © Pasi Aalto © Pasi Aalto © Pasi Aalto

Hotel Kirkenes / Rintala Eggertsson Architects

  • Architects: Rintala Eggertsson Architects
  • Location: Kirkenes, Norway
  • Architect: Sami Rintala
  • Construction team: Sami Rintala, George Lovett (architecture student, University of Sheffield, UK), Borghild Hulsvik (architecture student, Bergen Architect School), Anne Kathrine Vabø (architecture student, Bergen Architect School)
  • Client: Pikene på Broen, Via Travels
  • Materials: Wood, Bricks and Steel Wires
  • Dimensions: 6m (long) x 2,5 m (width) x 5 m (height)
  • Sponsors: Nicopan/ windows, Jotun/ paint
  • Area: 0.0 sqm

Hotel Kirkenes / Rintala Eggertsson Architects Hotel Kirkenes / Rintala Eggertsson Architects Hotel Kirkenes / Rintala Eggertsson Architects Hotel Kirkenes / Rintala Eggertsson Architects