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Google Madrid HQ / Jump Studios

01:00 - 28 November, 2013
Google Madrid HQ / Jump Studios, © Daniel Malhão
© Daniel Malhão

© Daniel Malhão © Daniel Malhão © Daniel Malhão © Daniel Malhão +82

  • Architects

  • Location

    Plaza de Carlos Trias Bertrán, 6, 28020 Madrid, Madrid, Spain
  • Managing Director

    Simon Jordan
  • Creative Director

    Shaun Fernandes
  • Project Architect / Lisbon Office Head

    Laszlo Varga
  • Project Year

    2013
  • Photographs

Bloomberg / Jump Studios

01:00 - 27 July, 2012
Bloomberg / Jump Studios, Courtesy of Jump Studios
Courtesy of Jump Studios

Courtesy of Jump Studios Courtesy of Jump Studios Courtesy of Jump Studios Courtesy of Jump Studios +27

  • Architects

  • Location

    St Luke's, Finsbury Square (EC2) (Stand G), London Borough of Islington, London EC2A, United Kingdom
  • Area

    0.0 sqm

Google Campus / Jump Studios

01:00 - 8 May, 2012
Google Campus / Jump Studios, Courtesy of  jump studios
Courtesy of jump studios

Courtesy of  jump studios Courtesy of  jump studios Courtesy of  jump studios Courtesy of  jump studios +29

  • Architects

  • Location

    4-5 Bonhill Street, London, England
  • Architect in Charge

    Shaun Fernandes, Markus Nonn
  • Furniture / Lighting

    Hay, Modus, Very Good & Proper, Branch Studios, Moroso, Bene, MagisMuuto, Luxo, Erco Jump Studios
  • Project Cost

    £ 2.2 M
  • Client

    Google UK Ltd.
  • Area

    2300.0 sqm

The Next Silicon Valley(s)

10:30 - 7 May, 2012
AOL Offices in Palo Alto © Jasper Sanidad
AOL Offices in Palo Alto © Jasper Sanidad

HP, Apple, Google – they all found their success amongst the peach groves and Suburban houses of California. But why? What is it about Silicon Valley that makes it the site of technological innovation the world over?

It’s tempting to assume that the Valley’s success must be, at least in part, due to its design. But how does innovation prosper? What kind of environment does it require? In a recent interview with The Atlantic Cities, Jonah Lehrer, author of Imagine: How Creativity Works, suggests that creativity is sparked from casual exchanges, the mingling of diversity, the constant interaction with the strange and new. In short, and as a recent study corroborates, innovation flourishes in dense metropolises.

Seemingly then, Silicon Valley, a sprawl of highways and office parks, has become a hotspot of creativity in spite of its design. But let’s not write off design just yet.

As technology makes location more and more irrelevant, many are looking to distill the magic of Silicon Valley and transplant it elsewhere. The key will be to design environments that can recreate the Valley’s culture of collaboration. The future Valleys of the world will be microsystems of creativity that imitate and utilize the structure of the city.