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LEGO@ Villa Pennisi in Musica

A theatre destroyed by a fire, a unique architecture workshop, a classical music festival and a creative challenge. Can architects design a structure to amplify the sound and put the music back in the theatre? LEGO Architecture Studio is helping out.

How Infrastructure Segregates Cities

The Washington Post has published a piece looking at how infrastructure acts as a form of segregation in cities in the US. Using racial dot maps from the University of Virginia’s Weldon Cooper Center for Public Service, they show how highways, railroads, historically uncrossable avenues, and similar urban design decisions have a huge impact on the physical isolation of different races. These types of infrastructure were also found to reinforce boundaries set by natural patterns of topography and bodies of water. Cities found to have clear infrastructural segregation include Pittsburgh, Hartford, DetroitWashington, D.C., and Milwaukee. Read the full article, here.

Spotlight: Geoffrey Bawa

Despite his late entry into architecture, Geoffrey Manning Bawa FRIBA, (July 23, 1919-May 27, 2003), explored modernism and its cultural implications, and created a unique, recognizable style of design which had a lasting impact on architects across the world. Well versed in Modernist theory, Bawa was one of the original proponents of Tropical Modernism, a design movement in which sensitivity for local context combines with form-making principles of modernism. Bawa’s architecture led to the formation of a new architectural identity and aesthetic for many tropical environments, and won him recognition and awards, including the Chairman’s Award of the Aga Kahn Special Chairman’s Award for Architecture (2001) and the title Deshamanya, in recognition by the government of Sri Lanka for his contributions to his country.

Spotlight: Richard Rogers

As one of the leading architects of the British High-Tech movement, Pritzker Prize-winner Richard Rogers stands out as one of the most innovative and distinctive architects of a generation. Rogers made his name in the 70s and 80s, with buildings such as the Centre Georges Pompidou in Paris and the Headquarters for Lloyd's Bank in London. To this day his work plays with similar motifs, utilizing bright colors and structural elements to create a style that is recognizable, yet also highly adaptable.

RIBA Future Trends Survey Reaches "All Time High"

The Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA)’s Future Trends Survey for June 2015 shows "an all-time high," with the workload index ascending to +44 compared to +37 last month. All nations and regions within the United Kingdom returned positive balance figures, with practices in the Midlands and East Anglia responding most confidently about workloads in the next quarter. Following a slight fall last month, the private housing sector workload forecast increased to +39 (from +34), while the public sector saw a modest increase back into positive figures. Workload forecast balance figures have remained extremely high. The survey reports that large-sized practices continue to be the most optimistic about growth, while small and medium-sized practices "remain in strongly positive territory."

Spotlight: Arata Isozaki

Japanese architect, teacher, and theorist Arata Isozaki (born 23 July, 1931) helped bring Japanese influence to some of the most prestigious buildings of the 20th century, and continues to work at the highest level today. Initially working in a distinctive form of modernism, Isozaki developed his own thoughts and theories on architecture into a complex style that invokes pure shape and space as much as it evokes post-modern ideas. Highly adaptable and socially concerned, his work has been acclaimed for being sensitive to context while still making statements of its own.

Registration Opens for eVolo 2016 Skyscraper Competition

eVolo Magazine has announced the start of their 11th annual Skyscraper Competition. Inviting architects, students, engineers, designers and artists, the competition places no restrictions on site, program or size, leaving participants free to explore the skyscraper as creatively as possible.

Viral Voices IV / STORYTELLING: On Media, Representation, and Narrative

How are contemporary architectural narratives created? And what are the various tools / media used to ‘tell the story’?

How is the said story tailored to a varying audience?

What story do journalists/editors/filmmakers like to tell about the architect? And the architecture? How does that profile shape our work, reach and influence?

What is architectural journalism for architects? What is it for the general public?

Are we in a crisis of architectural representation? What is the future of the publication and representation of architecture across various platforms?

Exhibition: Cersaie 2015

Cersaie—the world’s largest exhibition of ceramic tile and bathroom furnishings—will take place at the Bologna Exhibition Center in Bologna, Italy from September 28-October 2, 2015 for its 33rd year. The show is organized by Edi.Cer SpA and promoted by Confindustria Ceramica in collaboration with Bologna Fiere.

Exhibition: "Lines of Thoughts" Meinhard von Gerkan - 50 Years of Architecture in Sketches and Drawings

Together with his partners, Meinhard von Gerkan has written architectural history over the past 50 years: the practice started life with a drum roll, with the Berlin-Tegel Airport being the first project; today, over 380 projects have been completed.

To this day, von Gerkan develops his designs with the help of sketches. On the occasion of the 50-year anniversary of gmp – Architects von Gerkan, Marg and Partners and von Gerkan’s 80th birthday, the "Lines of Thoughts" exhibition in the newly built Architecture Pavilion at Elbchaussee presents selected projects from his archive, which includes well over 3,000 architectural sketches, in order to illustrate how his projects develop.

Event: Day of Play at RIBA Headquarters

Join us in a day-long celebration of all things play and take over the RIBA headquarters at 66 Portland Place. Participate in free activities, tours and workshops for all the family, inspired by The Brutalist Playground installation.

Exhibition: NORIHIKO DAN Symbiotic Thoughts of Architecture

A concrete tree trunk growing in the middle of a commercial street in Tokyo, an airport terminal that looks almost like a bird’s wing, a skyscraper facade that seems to move like ocean waves, a visitors’ center perfectly integrated into the landscape of Taiwan’s largest lake – nature is everpresent in Japanese architect Norihiko Dan’s buildings. His architecture never stands alone, for Dan always seeks symbiosis; this appears in his combination of geometric-archetypical with organic forms, in his urban planning projects, which bring submerged historic and cultural identities back to light, as well as in the ecological orientation of his buildings. With dramatic contrasts in architectural language and choice of materials Norihiko Dan insistently calls for a relationship between human beings and their surroundings.

Laka Competition 2015: "Architecture that Reacts"

Laka Competitions invites designers from around the world to submit their ideas of ‘architecture that reacts’. That means architecture which is able to respond and adjust dynamically to the current needs and circumstances. These circumstances are often unpredictable, but their consequences can be crucial. The architecture that reacts is the architecture that lives as a living organism, since it responds to the external stimuli and it develops because of it.— to react is to live

Spotlight: John Hejduk

Artist, architect and architectural theorist John Hejduk (19 July 1929 - 3 July 2000) introduced new ways of thinking about space that are still highly influential in both modernist and post-modernist architecture today, especially among the large number of architects who were once his students. Inspired both by darker, gothic themes and modernist thinking on the human psyche, his built work exercises influence far beyond proportion to its scale, and many of his unbuilt plans and drawings have gone on to inspire other projects and architects around the world. In addition, his drawing, writing and teaching - something he regarded as a duty which he did gladly - have gone on to shape the meeting of modernist and post modern influences in contemporary architecture and helped bring psychological approaches to the forefront of design.

25 Architects You Should Know

As an unavoidable art form, “architecture is one of humanity’s most visible and long-lasting forms of expression,” writes Complex Media. Within the past 150 years—the period of modern architecture—a distinct form of artistry has developed, significantly changing the way we look at the urban environments around us. To highlight some of the key figures in architecture over the past 150 years, Complex Media has created a list of “25 Architects You Should Know,” covering a range of icons including Zaha HadidIeoh Ming PeiPhilip JohnsonOscar NeimeyerSOMDaniel Libeskind, and more. Read the full list to learn more about each iconic architect, here.

Enter Now: AR Emerging Architecture Awards

Now in their 17th year, the AR Emerging Architecture Awards are one of the world's most popular and prestigious prize for up-and-coming architects, giving emerging practices invaluable impetus on their trajectory to wider recognition and success. Previous winners of the Awards have included Sou Fujimoto (Japan), Thomas Heatherwick (UK), Sean Godsell (Australia), Jurgen Mayer H. (Germany) and Li Xiaodong (China).

The AR Emerging Architecture Awards, with a £10,000 prize fund, celebrate excellence in completed work. Entries can be made across a very broad spectrum of project types. Buildings, interiors, landscaping, refurbishment, urban projects, temporary installations, furniture and product designs are all eligible. Jury members, including David Adjaye, OBE, Odile DecqPeter Cook will review each submitted project. The deadline for entries is September 11. Submit you work, here

Renzo Piano Teaches You How to Build the Perfect Sandcastle

In a recent article published by The GuardianRenzo Piano encourages architects to make sandcastles. "There is no age limit," he says, "... it helps you think like a child." The Italian architect credits the start of his career to the first sandcastle he ever made on the Genoa shoreline. "Making things has always been a pleasure for me – happy hands, happy mind – and making sandcastles was my training in fantasy."

Embracing the ephemeral nature of such a building, Piano has provided step-by-step instructions on how to make the "perfect" sandcastle: 1) "Study the waves" and site your castle near the water; 2) Build a 60cm tall "little mountain" with 45° slopes and surround it with a 30cm deep, 45cm wide moat; 3) Allow sea water to enter the moat, sit back and watch; and 4) Top the sand structure with a "little flag" to make it visible, then "go home and don't look back." 

Read Renzo's complete sandcastle instructions, here

Exhibition: Side by Side: Philip Johnson's Glass House and Mies van der Rohe's Farnsworth House

Side by Side is an exhibition by photographer Robin Hill that explores the similarities and differences between two of America's most iconic houses. The Glass House by Philip Johnson and The Farnsworth House by Mies van der Rohe. Through a series of dyptychs, Mr. Hill's lens explores both the geometry of the structures and their place in the environment. Tellingly the exhibition is housed in the Seagram Building designed by Mies van der Rohe and assisted by Philip Johnson. The lobby of The Four Seasons is an ideal venue for this exhibition as much of the design aesthetic of both architects is prevalent in the space as well as in the photographs.