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21st Century Nolli: How Pokemon GO and Augmented Reality Could Shape Our Cities

14:00 - 19 July, 2016

A photo posted by yesi (@mskittenk) on

Augmented reality is not a new piece of technology. The term has existed in some form since the early 90s, and it has had practical effects for architects since at least 2008, when ArchDaily posted its first AR article about a plugin for Sketchup that allowed users to rotate a digital model around on their desk using just their bare hands. But these past few weeks, society was given its first glimpse of augmented reality’s potential to affect the way we interact with the places we occupy.

That glimpse, of course, has been provided by Pokemon GO, the location-based augmented reality mobile game that allows players to capture virtual creatures throughout the real world. With more many active daily users as Twitter and a higher daily usage time than social media apps like Snapchat, Instagram and Whatsapp, it cannot be denied that the game has captured our attention unlike anything that has come before it.

Pompeii’s Most Famous House, the Villa of Mysteries, is at Risk of Collapse

09:30 - 19 July, 2016
Pompeii’s Most Famous House, the Villa of Mysteries, is at Risk of Collapse, © ElfQrin [CC BY-SA 4.0], via Wikimedia Commons
© ElfQrin [CC BY-SA 4.0], via Wikimedia Commons

One of Pompeii’s most precious gems, the Villa of Mysteries, is now at risk of collapse due to seismic activity in the Bay of Naples, as well as vibrations from a nearby train line transporting tourists. That's the conclusion of a recent study conducted by Italy’s National Agency for New Technologies, Energy and Sustainable Economic Development (ENEA). The news comes only a few months after the reopening of the house, whose stunning frescoes had just been restored.

As The Telegraph reports, the high-tech study showed that “in addition to the vibrations from the Vesuvius light railway commuter trains, which ferry tourists to Pompeii from Naples, the protective structure around the villa, built in armored cement, wood and steel 50 years ago is threatened by its own weight and water ingress.”

© Lure [CC BY-SA 3.0], via Wikimedia Commons © User:MatthiasKabel [CC BY-SA 3.0], via Wikimedia Commons © User:MatthiasKabel [CC BY-SA 3.0], via Wikimedia Commons © User:MatthiasKabel [CC BY-SA 3.0], via Wikimedia Commons +15

See the 17 Le Corbusier Projects Named as UNESCO World Heritage Sites

12:05 - 18 July, 2016
See the 17 Le Corbusier Projects Named as UNESCO World Heritage Sites

The UN Education, Scientific and Cultural Organization (commonly referred to as UNESCO) has named 17 projects in 7 countries by revolutionary Modernist architect Le Corbusier to their list of World Heritage Sites. Given to places of special cultural or physical significance, the designation will help to protect and preserve the buildings for future generations. Citing Le Corbusier’s inventive architectural language, UNESCO praised the collection of projects for “[reflecting] the solutions that the Modern Movement sought to apply during the 20th century to the challenges of inventing new architectural techniques to respond to the needs of society.”

“The inscription on the World Heritage List of 17 buildings of sites by Le Corbusier represents a strong encouragement to continue all along Le Corbusier's built work to maintain this living heritage and to hand it down to future generations,” said Fondation Le Corbusier President Antoine Picon in a statement. “It also contributes to the understanding of that complex and fragile legacy and helps its dissemination to the widest audience.”

Continue after the break for the full list of projects and images.

26 Things All Architects Can Relate To

09:30 - 18 July, 2016
26 Things All Architects Can Relate To, © hvostik via Shutterstock
© hvostik via Shutterstock

Working in architecture is always a challenging experience in which you just never know what might happen next. That said, there are a number of things we can collectively relate to as a part of this industry. Here we've created a list of things we're all too familiar with—whether that relates to finishing projects, working with clients, or just dealing with people that totally don't even know what goes on in architecture. Which ones did we miss?

Tippet Rise Art Center Combines Architecture, Art, Music and Mountains in Montana

09:30 - 17 July, 2016
Tippet Rise Art Center Combines Architecture, Art, Music and Mountains in Montana, Inverted Portal / Ensamble Studio. Image © Andre Costantini
Inverted Portal / Ensamble Studio. Image © Andre Costantini

What do Frederic Chopin, Alexander Calder and Montana's Bear Tooth Mountains have in common? A long summer day at Tippet Rise Art Center seeks to make the connections audible, visible, tangible.

Founded by philanthropists and artists Cathy and Peter Halstead and inaugurated in June 2016, Tippet Rise began as—and largely remains—a working ranch. It sprawls across 11,500 acres of rolling hills and alluvial mesas of southwestern. To the west rise the snowy heights of the Bear Tooth Mountains. Off to the east, hills give way to golden prairies that stretch out to the horizon.

Into this privileged landscape, the Halsteads and team have strategically inserted massive outdoor sculptures by Alexander Calder, Mark di Suvero, Stephen Talasnik, plus three specially commissioned works by the Spanish architectural firm Ensamble Studio. And hidden in a small depression near the entrance of the massive ranch, the LEED Platinum-certified Olivier Barn serves as both base camp for visitors and a state-of-the-art concert hall.

Beartooth Portal / Ensamble Studio. Image © Iwan Baan Domo / Ensamble Studio. Image © Andre Costantini Olivier Barn / Alban Bassuet with Laura Viklund and Arup engineering. Image © Andre Costantini Inverted Portal / Ensamble Studio. Image © Andre Costantini +52

Reinier de Graaf Discusses Moscow's Development and the "Major Stupidity" of Brexit

09:30 - 16 July, 2016

At the recently concluded Moscow Urban Forum, Renier de Graaf shared his opinion on a range of topics, from UK’s Brexit and the EU identity to OMA’s work in Russia, particularly in shaping the recent growth of Moscow. De Graaf is a partner at OMA and as director of the firm’s Think Tank, AMO, he produced The Image of Europe, an exhibition hoping to portray a “bold, explicit and popular” European Union. Thus, it comes as no surprise that De Graaf, along with Rem Koolhaas, is particularly outspoken about the recent events within the European Union.

A Tiny Luxury: What are “Tiny Houses” Really Saying About Architecture?

09:30 - 15 July, 2016
A Tiny Luxury: What are “Tiny Houses” Really Saying About Architecture?, © Roderick Aichinger
© Roderick Aichinger

Following a successful pilot launch in Boston and $1 million in venture backing, a startup company called Getaway has recently launched their service to New Yorkers. The company allows customers to rent out a collection of designer “tiny houses” placed in secluded rural settings north of the city; beginning at $99 per night, the service is hoping to offer respite for overstimulated city folk seeking to unplug and “find themselves.” The company was founded by business student Jon Staff and law student Pete Davis, both from Harvard University, out of discussions with other students about the issues with housing and the need for new ideas to house a new generation. From that came the idea of introducing the experience of Tiny House living to urbanites through weekend rentals.

Inspired by the notion of micro-housing and the powerful rhetoric of the Tiny House movement, initiatives like Getaway are part of a slew of architectural proposals that have emerged in recent years. Downsizing has been cited by its adopters as both a solution to the unaffordability of housing and a source of freedom from the insidious capitalist enslavement of “accumulating stuff.” Highly developed and urbanized cities such as New York seem to be leading the way for downsizing: just last year, Carmel Place, a special micro-housing project designed by nARCHITECTS, was finally completed in Manhattan to provide studio apartments much smaller than the city’s current minimum regulation of 400 square feet (37 square meters). Many, including Jesse Connuck, fail to see how micro-housing can be a solution to urban inequality, yet if we are to judge from the early success of startups like Getaway, micro-architecture holds widespread public appeal. Isn’t user satisfaction the ultimate goal of architecture? In that case, it’s important to investigate the ingenuity behind these undersized yet often overpriced spaces.

© thebearwalk.com © Kataram Studios © Roderick Aichinger © Kataram Studios +26

City of London Building Award 2016 Winners Announced

12:30 - 14 July, 2016
City of London Building Award 2016 Winners Announced, Winner: New Ludgate. Designed by Fletcher Priest Architects and Sauerbruch Hutton. Image
Winner: New Ludgate. Designed by Fletcher Priest Architects and Sauerbruch Hutton. Image

New Ludgate, a retail and commercial development located two blocks east of St. Paul’s Cathedral in downtown London, has been named the City of London Building of the Year 2016. The complex consists of two new buildings, One New Ludgate by Fletcher Priest Architects and Two New Ludgate by Sauerbruch Hutton. The award was given in recognition of “the buildings that support the ambitions of the City of London in delivering a world-class working environment, by evaluating both the quality of the architectural design and the impact the building has had on the city street scene.”

One New Ludgate by Fletcher Priest Architects. Image © Tim Soar Two New Ludgate by Sauerbruch Hutton. Image © Jan Bitter Salters’ Hall by dMFK. Image © Jack Hobhouse  Leathersellers’ Hall by Eric Parry. Image © Dirk Lindner +18

The Top 12 Architecture Channels on Youtube

09:30 - 14 July, 2016
The Top 12 Architecture Channels on Youtube

There’s so much to learn about architecture, yet so little time. The smart architect knows to have a variety of sources for their architectural knowledge, and that's why we’ve put together a shortlist of our Top 12 Architecture Channels on Youtube, and picked some of their best videos for you to see. Read more to find out the best architecture videos, from sketching and rendering tutorials to architecture documentaries.

RIBA Announces 2016 Stirling Prize Shortlist

20:51 - 13 July, 2016
RIBA Announces 2016 Stirling Prize Shortlist

The Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA) has announced six projects that will compete for the 2016 Stirling Prize, the award for the building that has made the greatest contribution to British architecture in the first year. Selected from the pool of regional winners around the country, the shortlisted buildings range from a small house in the south of England to a new college campus in Glasgow, Scotland. However, in a first for the Stirling Prize, the shortlist features two buildings coming from one client, Oxford University.

"Every one of the six buildings shortlisted today illustrates the huge benefit that well-designed buildings can bring to people’s lives," said RIBA President Jane Duncan. "With the dominance of university and further education buildings on the shortlist, it is clear that quality architecture’s main patrons this year are from the education sector. I commend these enlightened clients and supporters who have bestowed such remarkable education buildings."

The winner of the Stirling Prize will be announced on Thursday 6 October.

BIG and Heatherwick's Futuristic Google HQ Back on the Table After Massive Land Deal with LinkedIn

12:05 - 13 July, 2016
BIG and Heatherwick's Futuristic Google HQ Back on the Table After Massive Land Deal with LinkedIn, © Google / BIG / Heatherwick Studio
© Google / BIG / Heatherwick Studio

The “Googleplex” is back on. After the Mountain View City Council announced last year that they would be awarding the majority of the land needed to construct the futurist masterplan designed for Google by BIG and Thomas Heatherwick to fellow tech giant LinkedIn, the future of the ambitious glass-canopied corporate campus seemed to be dead in the water, with the architects even releasing images of a pared down design that would occupy a much smaller footprint. But all of that has now changed thanks to a surprising property swap between the two companies that will see over three million square feet of real estate switch hands.

Why Technology Isn't a One-Step Solution for Future Hotel Design

09:30 - 13 July, 2016
Why Technology Isn't a One-Step Solution for Future Hotel Design, Renaissance New York Midtown Hotel digital wall. Image Courtesy of Renaissance
Renaissance New York Midtown Hotel digital wall. Image Courtesy of Renaissance

This article was originally published on Autodesk's Line//Shape//Space publication as "Service With a Smile: Why Hotels of the Future Are High-Touch, Not High-Tech."

Although it opened in 2011, YOTEL New York feels like it belongs in 2084, the same year the science-fiction film Total Recall is set. Quintessentially futuristic, the original cult classic starring Arnold Schwarzenegger features robotic police officers, instant manicures, hovering cars, implanted memories, and skin-embedded cellphones. Its protagonist, Douglas Quaid, is a construction worker obsessed with vacationing on Mars.

One could easily imagine Quaid staying at a Martian outpost of YOTEL, a “minimal-service” hotel modeled after Japanese capsule hotels, which provide a large number of extremely small modular guest rooms for travelers willing to forgo all the services of a conventional hotel in exchange for convenient, affordable accommodations. These kinds of automated-service hotels may be a trend into the 2020s, but are they really hotels of the future?

How WeWork Experiments On Itself to Advance the Field of Office Design

10:23 - 12 July, 2016
How WeWork Experiments On Itself to Advance the Field of Office Design, The potted plants, images of trees on the giant light fixtures from Alex Allen Studio, and even a show tree help people make a connection to nature at work, which creative director Devin Vermeulen says is “proven to make people more creative, less stressed”. Image © Lauren Kallen
The potted plants, images of trees on the giant light fixtures from Alex Allen Studio, and even a show tree help people make a connection to nature at work, which creative director Devin Vermeulen says is “proven to make people more creative, less stressed”. Image © Lauren Kallen

In this article, originally published by Metropolis Magazine as "Redefining (and Redesigning) The Way WeWork," Anne Quito visits WeWork's offices in New York to discover how the company is using its own headquarters as the test bed for its future product offering.

In a nondescript building in New York’s Chelsea neighborhood, the global headquarters of WeWork buzzes with creative energy. In just a little over six years, the start-up at the forefront of the coworking-space rental boom has created a $16 billion operation with 50,000 members in 28 cities, with 96 locations announced for this year.

Spread across two and a half floors, the 50,000-square-foot headquarters is the home base for WeWork’s almost-700-strong New York–based staff and serves as a laboratory for its designers.

WeWork’s designers think of the giant staircase that connects three floors of its headquarters as a series of occasional meeting spaces, but also as a kind of indoor park. Image © Lauren Kallen Gathering spaces at WeWork’s headquarters offer a wide range of options in terms of informality and noise levels. The café tends to be fairly energetic. Image © Lauren Kallen The in-house recording studio has a contemporary flair. Image © Lauren Kallen Every WeWork location has some local element; the headquarters has a mural featuring a timeline of New York musicians—from rock and roll to hip-hop—along a narrow corridor. Image © Lauren Kallen +7

AD Classics: The Barbican Estate / Chamberlin, Powell and Bon Architects

04:00 - 12 July, 2016
AD Classics: The Barbican Estate / Chamberlin, Powell and Bon Architects, © Joas Souza
© Joas Souza

On the 29th December, 1940, at the height of the Second World War, an air raid by the Luftwaffe razed a 35-acre site in the heart of the City of London to the ground. The site was known as the Barbican (a Middle English word meaning fortification), so-called for the Roman wall which once stood in the area. Following the war, the City of London Corporation—the municipal governing body for the area—started to explore possibilities to bring this historic site into the twentieth century.

© Joas Souza © Joas Souza Gilbert House piloti. Image © Joas Souza Defoe House. Image © Joas Souza +28

Have You Found Any Pokémon Near Famous Landmarks in Pokémon GO? Show Us!

12:16 - 11 July, 2016

Unless you've been living under a Geodude for the past few days, you'll have heard about the launch of Pokémon GO, the latest release from the world-conquering Pokémon franchise and Niantic, the people behind the groundbreaking 2013 game Ingress. The game's central premise is that, using augmented reality, the classic creature-capturing game that we've known for the past 20 years can be overlaid onto the real world, requiring players to get out and explore their surroundings to find the Pokémon lurking in the streets and parks of their neighborhood.

Of course, the game's augmented reality element allows for some interesting juxtapositions between the real world and the game world, and opens up a new kind of "wildlife photography"—as exemplified by the above image of a Krabby at Sydney Harbor, captured on a mass "Pokémon GO walk" that was organized in the city over the weekend. We'd like to see our readers' best snaps of Pokémon alongside famous landmarks. Have you seen a Staryu at the Statue of Liberty? A Grimer at the Golden Gate Bridge? A Weepinbell at the Washington Memorial? We want to see it!

Upload your very best shots in the comments, and we'll feature our favorites in an upcoming article.

INTERIORS: Mr. Robot

09:30 - 11 July, 2016
Courtesy of INTERIORS Journal
Courtesy of INTERIORS Journal

Interiors is an online film and architecture publication, published by Mehruss Jon Ahi and Armen Karaoghlanian. Interiors runs an exclusive column for ArchDaily that analyzes and diagrams films in terms of space. Their Official Store will carry exclusive prints from these posts.

The visual medium of film has meant that style has always played a significant role in cinema. It’s one of the reasons why film and architecture have gone hand in hand for the past hundred years. In some sense, both mediums display complementary qualities; film as photography captures the structural aspects of architecture, while architectural design dictates cinematic space.

The same can’t be said for television – because even though television has undergone an aesthetic transformation in the past few years, with shows like The Sopranos, Mad Men, Breaking Bad, True Detective, and The Knick, it’s still very much a character-based medium. The format itself allows for the close examination of characters over the course of many hours.

Bee Breeders Reveal Winning Designs for a LGBT Youth Asylum Center in Uganda

12:00 - 10 July, 2016
Bee Breeders Reveal Winning Designs for a LGBT Youth Asylum Center in Uganda, First Prize Winner "Ugandan LGBT Youth Asylum" by Enrico Chinellato and Jacopo Donato  . Image Courtesy of Bee Breeders
First Prize Winner "Ugandan LGBT Youth Asylum" by Enrico Chinellato and Jacopo Donato . Image Courtesy of Bee Breeders

Bee Breeders, organizers of international architectural competitions, have announced this week the three winners and six honorable mentions of their Uganda LGBT Youth Asylum Center competition. Inspired by recent activism in Uganda, Bee Breeders sought the design of a community center to welcome those in the LGBT community who have been ostracized from their home environments. The judges said that they were looking for designs that focused on social integration, not isolation, celebrating those who created "a community center, not a prison."

First Prize Winner "Ugandan LGBT Youth Asylum" by Enrico Chinellato and Jacopo Donato  . Image Courtesy of Bee Breeders First Prize Winner "Ugandan LGBT Youth Asylum" by Enrico Chinellato and Jacopo Donato  . Image Courtesy of Bee Breeders Second Prize Winner "Ugandan LGBT Youth Asylum" by Marcelo Venzon, Julia Park, Guilherme Pardini and João Paulo Carrascoza. Image Courtesy of Bee Breeders Third Prize Winner "Ugandan LGBT Youth Asylum" by Tatiana Ioannidou and Chariton Lazarides. Image Courtesy of Bee Breeders +29

Watch Almost 6,000 Years of Human Urbanization Unfold Before Your Eyes in This Video

09:40 - 9 July, 2016

From the Cradle of Civilization in ancient Mesopotamia to the modern urban explosion in China, cities are among the most obvious and dramatic evidence of human existence. In a recent paper published in Scientific Data, a team led by Yale University researcher Meredith Reba mapped the emergence of cities between 3,700 BC and 2,000 AD based on when their populations were first recorded in historical accounts.

Taking the data from this study, Max Galka of Metrocosm has produced this fascinating animation showing the history of cities worldwide. "Most datasets available go back only a few years or decades at most. This is the first one I've seen that covers 6 millennia," Galka told CityLab. "I'm a big fan of history, so after reading the study, I thought it would be interesting to visualize the data and see if it offers some perspective." The steady flow of time may seem a little slow at first, but stick with it through the early BC years and the shifts in urban development start to get intriguing. And—spoiler alert—buckle up as you approach the 20th century.