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OMA's Taipei Performing Arts Center Facade Unveiled

09:40 - 1 September, 2016
OMA's Taipei Performing Arts Center Facade Unveiled, OMA's Taipei Performing Arts Center Facade Unveiled. Image © OMA by Chris Stowers
OMA's Taipei Performing Arts Center Facade Unveiled. Image © OMA by Chris Stowers

The scaffolding obscuring the facade of OMA’s Taipei Performing Arts Center has begun to come down, exposing the aluminum exteriors of the spherical Proscenium Playhouse and the Multiform Theatre for the first time. Upon completion, the experimental building will feature a looped public pathway, flexible auditoriums and unique stage environments. Construction on the building is now moving full speed ahead, with an expected opening date in June 2017.

Continue on for more images of the in-progress building.

11 Historical Examples of How to Design Doorways, as Selected by Sketchfab

10:00 - 31 August, 2016
11 Historical Examples of How to Design Doorways, as Selected by Sketchfab

Our friends at Sketchfab have noticed a recurring trend: among the many 3D scans shared on their platform, a significant number are of historical doorways. Often neglected in today’s designs, doors and doorways are essential physical and mental transition points between the interior and the exterior of a building. While Mies van der Rohe’s strive for visual continuity and the use of glass doors has some critical advantages, it is not applicable – or only poorly applicable – to every design case. Fortunately, history shows that visually and spatially differentiating doors and doorways from the rest of a facade can be a resourceful alternative.

AD Round-Up: 10 Sacred Spaces

04:00 - 31 August, 2016
AD Round-Up: 10 Sacred Spaces, Courtesy of Flickr user Flemming Ibsen under CC BY-NC 2.0
Courtesy of Flickr user Flemming Ibsen under CC BY-NC 2.0

Religion, in one form or another, has formed the core of human society for much of our history. It therefore stands to reason that religious architecture has found equal prominence in towns and cities across the globe. Faith carries different meanings for different peoples and cultures, resulting in a wide variety of approaches to the structures in which worship takes place: some favor sanctuaries, others places of education and community, while others place the greatest emphasis on nature itself. Indeed, many carry secondary importance as symbols of national power or cultural expression.

AD Classics are ArchDaily's continually updated collection of longer-form building studies of the world's most significant architectural projects. The collection of sacred spaces collated here invariably reveal one desire that remains constant across all faiths and cultures: shifting one’s gaze from the mundane and everyday and fixing it on the spiritual, the otherworldly, and the eternal.

Courtesy of Flickr user Arian Zweger under CC BY 2.0 Courtesy of Flickr user Futo-Tussauds under CC BY-NC-SA 2.0 © Expiatory Temple of the Sagrada Familia Courtesy of Flickr user Naoya Fujii under CC BY-NC 2.0 +10

David Adjaye Discusses the Narrative of the National Museum of African American History

09:30 - 30 August, 2016
David Adjaye Discusses the Narrative of the National Museum of African American History, The National Museum of African American History and Culture (NMAAHC), which will occupy the last available site on the National Mall, was a challenge for British architect David Adjaye, who is known for designing buildings that are highly referential to their surroundings. Image © Alan Karchmer
The National Museum of African American History and Culture (NMAAHC), which will occupy the last available site on the National Mall, was a challenge for British architect David Adjaye, who is known for designing buildings that are highly referential to their surroundings. Image © Alan Karchmer

This article was originally published by Metropolis Magazine as "Constructing a Narrative."

It’s rare for an architect to have the opportunity to design a building in which symbolism and form are as important as function, if not more so. But this was the task given to David Adjaye when he won the commission to design the National Museum of African American History and Culture (NMAAHC), which, when it opens in September, will be the final Smithsonian institution to take its place on the National Mall in Washington, D.C. Adjaye, whose work is marked for its extreme sensitivity to context, found himself challenged in ways he had never been before. On the occasion of the completion of Adjaye’s Eugene McDermott Award residency at MIT, Metropolis editor Vanessa Quirk spoke with the architect about the new institution, its symbolic significance, and the blurry boundary between monument and museum.

© Alan Karchmer © Alan Karchmer With no dense urban context to draw from, Adjaye eventually found inspiration in the classical vernacular. Indeed, the angle of the building’s facade matches that of the Washington Monument’s pyramid. Image © Alan Karchmer The three tiers of the building organize the spatial experience of the museum into past, present, and future. Image © Alan Karchmer +8

27 Songs With Architectural Shout-Outs

06:00 - 30 August, 2016

Architecture, like music, inspires us daily. Our sister site ArchDaily Brasil, in partnership with Spotify, created an architecture- and urbanism-themed playlist, with shout-outs to cities, buildings and even architects themselves. In the list you'll find everything from David Bowie singing about Philip Johnson and Richard Rogers, to Laurie Anderson citing Buckminster Fuller and the Beatles fretting over a visit to an apartment. 

Listen to the playlist after the break and add songs with architecture shout-outs in the comments. 

The 20 Most Inspirational Non-Architecture TED Talks for Architects

08:00 - 29 August, 2016
The 20 Most Inspirational Non-Architecture TED Talks for Architects

For more than 3 decades now, the annual TED Conference and its many affiliated events have served as an important platform for, as their tagline puts it, "ideas worth spreading," and has inspired countless people through its fast paced thought-provoking presentations. Founded in 1984 by architect and graphic designer Richard Saul Wurman, there have been many architecture presentations throughout the conferences—but there are even more inspirational talks which aren't necessarily about architecture. Here we've compiled 21 of the best TED Talks in recent years which, while not strictly about architecture, will certainly appeal to the architectural mindset. Covering a variety of topics such as creativity, art, productivity, technological advancements, and the science of cities and the natural environment, these videos will inspire you to become a better architect.

Which non-architectural TED talks have inspired you? Don't forget to share further recommendations in the comments below!

AD Round-Up: The Architecture of Transit

04:00 - 29 August, 2016
AD Round-Up: The Architecture of Transit, Courtesy of Detroit Publishing co. via US Library of Congress (Public Domain)
Courtesy of Detroit Publishing co. via US Library of Congress (Public Domain)

Architecture inherently appears to be at odds with our mobile world – while one is static, the other is in constant motion. That said, architecture has had, and continues to have, a significant role in facilitating the rapid growth and evolution of transportation: cars require bridges, ships require docks, and airplanes require airports.

In creating structures to support our transit infrastructure, architects and engineers have sought more than functionality alone. The architecture of motion creates monuments – to governmental power, human achievement, or the very spirit of movement itself. AD Classics are ArchDaily's continually updated collection of longer-form building studies of the world's most significant architectural projects. Here we've assembled seven projects which stand as enduring symbols of a civilization perpetually on the move. 

© Flickr user littleeve Courtesy of Wikimedia user A. Savin under CC BY-SA 3.0 © Satoru Mishima / FOA © Cameron Blaylock +7

Students at EASA 2016 Transform Nida in Lithuania With Series of Installations

10:15 - 28 August, 2016
Students at EASA 2016 Transform Nida in Lithuania With Series of Installations, Dream Dune. Image © Alexandra Kononchenko
Dream Dune. Image © Alexandra Kononchenko

The 2016 European Architecture Students Assembly (EASA) has concluded in Nida, Lithuania. Centering around its title theme of "Not Yet Decided," the two-week event included 35 workshops, with over half of the results still available to view around Nida. Among the most noticeable are "Highlight," a 10-meter tall observation tower close to Nida's lighthouse, a "nomadic theater" named "Atmosphere," a relaxation space known as "The Living Room" at the end of a pier, and a sculptural seating installation on the beach known as "Dream Dune." Read on to see images of all the completed installations.

The Living Room. Image © Alexandra Kononchenko © Alexandra Kononchenko The Next Step. Image © Alexandra Kononchenko Highlight. Image © Lucas Bonnel +38

"Unofficial" Design for Obama Presidential Library Provides "Second Home" To Visitors

08:00 - 27 August, 2016
"Unofficial" Design for Obama Presidential Library Provides "Second Home" To Visitors, Courtesy of Raynaldo Theodore Design Studio
Courtesy of Raynaldo Theodore Design Studio

Just as the competition to design the official Obama Presidential Library in Chicago was heating up, Arcbazar orchestrated a simultaneous, open-call for ideas competition asking  “What sort of Presidential Library would the people design?." Raynaldo Theodore Design Studio (RTDS) led by Raynaldo Theodore, Ryan Ridge, and Kalvin Widjaja responded with a proposal that focuses on Obama's peaceful and inclusive spirit to create a place of welcome and community. Dubbed The V-House, their design is comprised of a series of indoor/outdoor sequences which reference Obama's life and significant points in its Chicago context.   

Courtesy of Raynaldo Theodore Design Studio Courtesy of Raynaldo Theodore Design Studio Courtesy of Raynaldo Theodore Design Studio Courtesy of Raynaldo Theodore Design Studio +29

This Floating Desalination Megastructure is Designed to Combat California's Water Shortages

09:30 - 25 August, 2016
This Floating Desalination Megastructure is Designed to Combat California's Water Shortages, Day View of the Vessel. Image Courtesy of Bart//Bratke
Day View of the Vessel. Image Courtesy of Bart//Bratke

California is suffering through its 5th year of severe water shortage. Aquifers and rivers continue to dry out as the water provided by melting snowpacks is reduced, and even the heavy rain brought by El Niño this year could not relieve the drought. Authorities are wary of the long-term consequences for California and neighboring areas of the Colorado River, and Santa Monica is now seeing a growing number of initiatives to control the use of potable water and find sustainable solutions.

Most recently, a competition asked architects, artists and scientists to conceive sustainable infrastructure projects to improve Santa Monica’s water supply. Bart//Bratke and studioDE developed a raft structure named “Foram” that illustrates the future of floating platforms in sustainable development.

Night View from the Coast. Image Courtesy of Bart//Bratke Aerial Coast Assembly. Image Courtesy of Bart//Bratke Pavilion Alignment. Image Courtesy of Bart//Bratke Interior of the Pavilion. Image Courtesy of Bart//Bratke +15

Moscow Has a New Standard for Street Design

04:00 - 25 August, 2016
Moscow Has a New Standard for Street Design, Street and Urban Public Space Design Standard. Image © KB Strelka Archive
Street and Urban Public Space Design Standard. Image © KB Strelka Archive

Earlier this year the development of a new Street Design Standard for Moscow was completed under a large-scale urban renovation program entitled My Street, and represents the city's first document featuring a complex approach to ecology, retail, green space, transportation, and wider urban planning. The creators of the manual set themselves the goal of making the city safer and cleaner and, ultimately, improving the quality of life. In this exclusive interview, Strelka Magazine speaks to the Street Design Standard's project manager and Strelka KB architect Yekaterina Maleeva about the infamous green fences of Moscow, how Leningradskoe Highway is being made suitable for people once again, and what the document itself means for the future of the Russian capital.

Material Focus: House in Lago Sul Qi 25 by Sérgio Parada Arquitetos Associados

08:00 - 24 August, 2016
Material Focus: House in Lago Sul Qi 25 by Sérgio Parada Arquitetos Associados, © Haruo Mikami
© Haruo Mikami

This article is part of our new "Material Focus" series, which asks architects to elaborate on the thought process behind their material choices and sheds light on the steps required to get a building constructed.

The House in Lago Sur Qi 25 was designed by  Sérgio Parada Arquitetos Associados firm. The project is 800 square meters and the layout is organized into 3 floors. Their volumes were defined by their use: intimate, service, formal and leisure. The project’s structure is completely made up of reinforced concrete with large openings that allow for complete integration of the exterior with the interior. We talked with the architect Rodrigo Biavati to learn more about the material choices and challenges of the project.

9 Reasons to Become an Architect

07:00 - 24 August, 2016
9 Reasons to Become an Architect, © Leandro Fuenzalida
© Leandro Fuenzalida

Making the decision to pursue architecture is not easy. Often, young students think that they have to be particularly talented at drawing, or have high marks in math just to even apply for architecture programs. Once they get there, many students are overwhelmed by the mountainous tasks ahead.

While the path to becoming an architect varies from country to country, the average time it takes to receive a Masters in Architecture is between 5 and 7 years, and following that is often the additional burden of licensure which realistically takes another couple of years to undertake. Knowing these numbers, it’s not particularly encouraging to find out that the average architect does not make as much as doctors and lawyers, or that 1 in 4 architecture students in the UK are seeking treatment for mental health issues. These are aspects which architecture needs to work on as an industry. However, beyond these problems, there are still many fulfilling reasons to fall in love with the industry and become an architect. Here are just some of them.

Why We're Celebrating Today And Why All Architects Should, Too

10:15 - 23 August, 2016

On this day twenty-five years ago Tim Berners-Lee launched the “World Wide Web” protocol at CERN in Switzerland, ushering in the age of the Internet. Over the last two decades this global information network has rapidly evolved, increasingly influencing how architecture is conceived, produced, discussed and ultimately implemented in real space.

See Paul Rudolph's Orange County Government Center Dismantled Over 4 Seasons With These Photos

09:30 - 23 August, 2016
See Paul Rudolph's Orange County Government Center Dismantled Over 4 Seasons With These Photos, Spring – April 7, 2015. Image © Harlan Erskine
Spring – April 7, 2015. Image © Harlan Erskine

This article was originally published by Metropolis Magazine as "A Brutal Dismantling."

As soon as photographer Harlan Erskine discovered the plans to demolish Paul Rudolph's iconic Orange County Government Center in New York, he knew he needed to bear witness to its demise. Beyond admiring the building's dynamic form, the photographer recognized its continued impact on architecture today, particularly noting its influence on Herzog and de Meuron's "Jenga tower."

Visiting on four separate occasions throughout 2015 and 2016, Erskine captured the dismantling of this iconic Brutalist work with stunning severity. See the building's final seasons below.

Winter – March 8, 2015. Image © Harlan Erskine Winter – March 8, 2015. Image © Harlan Erskine Spring – April 7, 2015. Image © Harlan Erskine Spring – May 28, 2016. Image © Harlan Erskine +24

How to Create Animated GIFs in Revit

09:30 - 22 August, 2016

This article was originally posted on ArchSmarter.

ArchDaily recently posted an interesting article on using animated GIFs for architectural drawings. The article had some great examples but was short on details of how to actually create these images.

I was curious how to create animated GIFs using Revit so I looked into the process. It turns out it’s pretty easy, provided you’re systematic when creating your views and have access to photo-editing software, like PhotoShop. Want to try it yourself? Follow the steps below to create your own animated GIFs in Revit.

How to Integrate the 12 Principles of Permaculture to Design a Truly Sustainable Project

07:00 - 22 August, 2016

The 12 principles published here are explained in detail in the book Permaculture: Principles and Pathways Beyond Sustainability, by David Holmgren.

In 1978, Australian ecologists David Holmgren and Bill Mollison coined for the first time the concept of permaculture as a systematic method. For Mollison, "permaculture is the philosophy of working with and not against nature, after a long and thoughtful observation." [1] Meanwhile, Holmgren defines the term as "those consciously designed landscapes which simulate or mimic the patterns and relationships observed in natural ecosystems." [2] 

In 2002, Holmgren published the book Permaculture: Principles and Pathways Beyond Sustainability, defining 12 design principles that can be used as a guide when generating sustainable systems. These principles can be applied to all daily processes in order to humanize those processes, increase efficiency, and in the long term ensure the survival of mankind.

What if we apply them to the design process of an architectural project?

Marwa Al-Sabouni Explains How Syrian Architecture Laid the Foundations for War

09:30 - 21 August, 2016

In 2014, Syrian architect Marwa al-Sabouni won the Syria category of the UN Habitat Mass Housing Competition for a housing scheme she developed for the city of Homs, her hometown. Now over two years later, Thames and Hudson has published her book Battle for Home: The Vision of a Young Architect in Syria. Throughout all of these events, al-Sabouni has remained in Syria. As the Guardian puts it: “As bombs fell around her, Syrian architect Marwa al-Sabouni stayed in Homs throughout the civil war, making plans to build hope from carnage.”

In this TEDSummit video, Al-Sabouni argues “that while architecture is not the axis around which all of human life rotates... it has the power to... direct human activity” She believes that the Old Islamic cities of Syria were once harmonious urban entities which advocated for co-habitation and tolerance through their intertwining. However, she posits that over the last century, beginning with French colonization, the Ancient towns were seen as un-modern and were gradually “improved” with elements of modernity: “brutal unfinished concrete blocks, aesthetic devastation and divisive communities that zoned communities by class, creed, or affluence.” This urban condition, she argues, is what created the conditions for the uprising-turned-civil war.