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18 Useful Research Resources for Architects Online

09:41 - 1 August, 2016
18 Useful Research Resources for Architects Online

For those of us that aren’t based out of a university—and even for many who are—finding research resources that cover the topic you're interested in can be a challenge. But they can be found, and thanks to the internet your search no longer needs to be limited to nearby libraries. In fact, many world-renowned libraries and magazines are now working to digitize important parts of their collection, while a number of online organizations have sprung up with missions to improve access to information. To help you identify some of the most useful, we’ve put together a list of 18 free websites that offer scholarly articles, publications, photos, videos, and much more.

AD Classics: Bharat Bhavan / Charles Correa

04:00 - 1 August, 2016
AD Classics: Bharat Bhavan / Charles Correa, © Charles Correa Foundation
© Charles Correa Foundation

In the late 1970s, the Government of India launched an initiative to build in every state capital an institution to celebrate the cultural and creative output of the nation. Although the scheme was largely unsuccessful, one shining example remains: Bharat Bhavan (‘India House’), located in Bhopal.

Designed by Indian architectural luminary Charles Correa, this multi-arts center first opened its doors in 1982. More than thirty years later, it continues to house a variety of cultural facilities and play host to multitude of arts events. The design of the complex is a product of Correa’s mission to establish a modern architectural style specific to India and distinct from European Modernism. Drawing on the plentiful source material provided by the rich architectural heritage of his home country, at Bharat Bhavan Correa produced a building for the modern era which manages to also remain firmly rooted in the vernacular traditions of India’s past.

© Charles Correa Foundation © Charles Correa Foundation © Charles Correa Foundation © Charles Correa Foundation +50

Material Focus: Salling Tower by Dorte Mandrup Arkitekter

09:30 - 31 July, 2016
Material Focus: Salling Tower by Dorte Mandrup Arkitekter, © Torben Eskerod
© Torben Eskerod

This article is part of our new "Material Focus" series, which asks architects to elaborate on the thought process behind their material choices and sheds light on the steps required to get buildings actually built.

Installed last year, the Salling Tower provides a striking, sculptural landmark in Aarhus Docklands. From inside, its deceptively simple counterbalanced form provides a range of ways to look out over the harbor and the city - but from the outside the project's designers, Dorte Mandrup Arkitekter wanted the tower to take on an abstract appearance, referencing nautical themes with its sail-like shape and porthole-like openings all while obscuring the process of its own construction. To do this, the firm created a structure composed entirely of a single steel piece resting on top of its foundations. In this interview, project architect Noel Wibrand tells us about how the project's material choice contributed to the construction process.

© Torben Eskerod © Torben Eskerod © Torben Eskerod © Torben Eskerod +8

HASSELL + OMA Reveal Design for New Museum for Western Australia

08:45 - 31 July, 2016
HASSELL + OMA Reveal Design for New Museum for Western Australia, The New Museum for Western Australia. Image Courtesy of HASSEL + OMA
The New Museum for Western Australia. Image Courtesy of HASSEL + OMA

With the contract to design and build the museum in Perth officially awarded to contractor Brookfield Multiplex, HASSELL + OMA have revealed the design for the New Museum for Western Australia. The WA Government commissioned HASSEL + OMA to design the cultural institution in April of this year. 

HASSELL Principal and Board Director Mark Loughnan, and OMA Managing Partner-Architect David Gianotten stated: “Our vision for the design was to create spaces that promote engagement and collaboration, responding to the needs of the Museum and the community. We want it to create a civic place for everyone, an interesting mix of heritage and contemporary architecture, that helps revitalize the Perth Cultural Centre while celebrating the culture of Western Australia on the world stage. The design is based on the intersection of a horizontal and vertical loop creating large possibilities of curatorial strategies for both temporary and fixed exhibitions.” 

Places Journal Examines Post-Katrina Architecture in New Orleans

09:30 - 30 July, 2016
Places Journal Examines Post-Katrina Architecture in New Orleans, Musicians Village Rainbow Row, New Orleans. Used under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/'>Creative Commons</a>. Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/27217934@N04/2724324298'>Tanya Lukasik</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/'>CC BY 2.0</a>
Musicians Village Rainbow Row, New Orleans. Used under Creative Commons. Image © Tanya Lukasik licensed under CC BY 2.0

The damage caused by Hurricane Katrina in 2005 can never be forgotten, but 10 years after the rebuilding of New Orleans started in 2006, a new architecture has emerged with cutting-edge designs being widely celebrated in the media. The Make It Right foundation (founded after the disaster to help with structural recovery) commissioned first-class architects such as Morphosis, Shigeru Ban, and David Adjaye to design safe and sustainable houses for New Orleans’ Lower 9th Ward. But Richard Campanella and Cassidy Rosen worry that this vision is detached from reality.

Cubes, Spheres and Inverted Pyramids: 10 Groundbreaking Residential Projects

12:30 - 29 July, 2016
Cubes, Spheres and Inverted Pyramids: 10 Groundbreaking Residential Projects, AD Classics: Bolwoning / Dries Kreijkamp. Image © Gili Merin
AD Classics: Bolwoning / Dries Kreijkamp. Image © Gili Merin

AD Classics are ArchDaily's continually updated collection of longer-form building studies of the world's most significant architectural projects. Here we've rounded-up ten groundbreaking residential projects from this collection, ranging from a 15th century Venetian palazzo to a three-dimensional axonometric projection. Although some appear a little strange, all have been realised and have made lasting contributions to the wider architectural discourse. You can study residential cubes, spheres and inverted pyramids—plus projects by the likes of OMA, Álvaro Siza, and Richard and Su Rogers—after the break.

Video: Calatrava’s Dubai Observation Tower Passes Wind Tunnel Testing

07:30 - 29 July, 2016

The Tower at Dubai Creek Harbour, Santiago Calatrava's competition-winning "landmark" residential and observation tower in Dubai, has passed through wind tunnel tests, confirming the structural strength of the project. When complete, the project will constitute the heart of a 6 square kilometer master-planned community set by the historic Dubai Creek and only 10 minutes from the Dubai International Airport.

Read more after the break and check out the visualization of the project above.

Seoul's Dramatic "New Towns" Are Captured in this Photoset by Manuel Alvarez Diestro

10:10 - 28 July, 2016
Seoul's Dramatic "New Towns" Are Captured in this Photoset by Manuel Alvarez Diestro, © Manuel Alvarez Diestro
© Manuel Alvarez Diestro

As Seoul’s population boomed, apartment blocks became commonplace. Photographer Manuel Alvarez Diestro spent 6 months exploring the city’s new towns, aiming to “reveal in visual terms the expansive nature of urbanization and the transformation of the landscape through the construction of these new housing developments of massive scale.”

© Manuel Alvarez Diestro © Manuel Alvarez Diestro © Manuel Alvarez Diestro © Manuel Alvarez Diestro +15

AD Classics: Grundtvig's Church / Peder Wilhelm Jensen-Klint

06:30 - 28 July, 2016
AD Classics: Grundtvig's Church / Peder Wilhelm Jensen-Klint, Courtesy of Flickr user Flemming Ibsen
Courtesy of Flickr user Flemming Ibsen

Six million yellow bricks on a hilltop just outside Copenhagen form one of the world’s foremost, if not perhaps comparatively unknown, Expressionist monuments. Grundtvigs Kirke (“Grundtvig’s Church”), designed by architect Peder Vilhelm Jensen Klint, was built between 1921 and 1940 as a memorial to N.F.S. Grundtvig – a famed Danish pastor, philosopher, historian, hymnist, and politician of the 19th century.[1] Jensen Klint, inspired by Grundtvig’s humanist interpretation of Christianity, merged the scale and stylings of a Gothic cathedral with the aesthetics of a Danish country church to create a landmark worthy of its namesake.[2]

It was decided in 1912 that Grundtvig, who had passed away in 1873, had been so significant to Danish history and culture that he merited a national monument. Two competitions were held in 1912 and 1913, bringing in numerous design submissions for statues, decorative columns, and architectural memorials.[3]

Courtesy of Flickr user Flemming Ibsen Courtesy of Flickr user Rune Brimer Courtesy of Flickr user noona11 Courtesy of Flickr user Flemming Ibsen +18

8 Projects that Exemplify Moscow's Urban Movement

09:30 - 27 July, 2016
8 Projects that Exemplify Moscow's Urban Movement, Zaryadye Park / Diller Scofidio + Renfro. Image Courtesy of Zaryadye Park
Zaryadye Park / Diller Scofidio + Renfro. Image Courtesy of Zaryadye Park

When it comes to urbanism these days, people’s attention is increasingly turning to Moscow. The city clearly intends to become one of the world’s leading megacities in the near future and is employing all necessary means to achieve its goal, with the city government showing itself to be very willing to invest in important urban developments (though not without some criticism).

A key player in this plan has been the Moscow Urban Forum. Although the forum’s stated goal is to find adequate designs for future megacities, a major positive side-effect is that it enables the city to organize the best competitions, select the best designers, and build the best urban spaces to promote the city of Moscow. The Forum also publishes research and academic documents to inform Moscow’s future endeavors; for example, Archaeology of the Periphery, a publication inspired by the 2013 forum and released in 2014, notably influenced the urban development on the outskirts of Moscow, but also highlighted the importance of combining urban development with the existing landscape.

Garage Museum of Contemporary Art / OMA. Image © Yuri Palmin Moscow Riverfront / Project Meganom. Image Courtesy of Project Meganom Novoperedelkino Subway Station / U-R-A. Image Courtesy of U-R-A | United Riga Architects Luzhniki Stadium. Image © Flickr user bbmexplorer licensed under CC BY-ND 2.0 +43

Bart Lootsma Dissects, Unpicks and Evaluates the 2016 Venice Biennale

04:00 - 27 July, 2016
Bart Lootsma Dissects, Unpicks and Evaluates the 2016 Venice Biennale, One installation of the Central Pavilion, curated by Alejandro Aravena. Image © Laurian Ghinitoiu
One installation of the Central Pavilion, curated by Alejandro Aravena. Image © Laurian Ghinitoiu

In two lectures delivered by Bart Lootsma, Professor and Head of Institute for Architectural Theory and History at the University of Innsbruck, the 2016 Venice Biennale—Reporting From the Front—is dissected, unpicked and evaluated through the national participations (pavilions) and Alejandro Aravena's central exhibitions. Lootsma, who has broadcast the lectures as publicly available resources on architecturaltheory.eu, is the co-curator of the 2016 Pavilion of Montenegro.

7 Ways to Use Animated GIFs to Improve Your Project Presentation

09:30 - 26 July, 2016

Introducing movement to drawings and diagrams is an excellent way to show the development and progress of ideas fundamental to a project. Animated GIFs can therefore be a useful tool to improve your project presentation, explaining in a lean way a large amount of complex information.

When it comes to architectural drawings, it's fundamental to understand what information needs to be highlighted and what is the best way to show it, getting rid of all the extra data to focus attention on the main asset. With that in mind, here is a list of 7 different types of animated GIF that really show off the best of every project.

Bijoy Jain Designs Australia's Largest Bamboo Structure for 2016 MPavilion

12:40 - 25 July, 2016

The Naomi Milgrom Foundation has released plans for Studio Mumbai founder Bijoy Jain’s design for the 2016 MPavilion, the Australian counterpart to London's wildly successful Serpentine Gallery Pavilion program. Continuing the concepts driving Studio Mumbai’s work, the pavilion will utilize a process Jain describes as ‘Lore,’ an exploration of handmade architecture and simplicity of building craft that centers on the relationship between making and human connectedness.

Courtesy of Studio Mumbai Courtesy of Studio Mumbai © Nicholas Watt © Nicholas Watt +23

The 80-20 Rule: The Key to Producing Better Work in Less Time

09:30 - 25 July, 2016
The 80-20 Rule: The Key to Producing Better Work in Less Time, © Max Griboedov via Shutterstock
© Max Griboedov via Shutterstock

This article was originally published on ArchSmarter as "How to Work Smarter with the 80-20 Rule."

“OK, let me see your list.” I was fresh out of architecture school and working on my first project as a designer. It was one week before our design Development Deadline. The project manager asked me to draw up a list of remaining design issues.

“Here are the ten things I have left,” I said as I handed over the list. “It was hard to prioritize them. They’re all really important.” I was fortunate to be working with an experienced project manager who, in addition to being extremely patient with me, saw it as her responsibility to mold and shape green architecture graduates into fully functioning architects. Not an easy task...

10 Steps to Simplify Your Firm's Transition to BIM

09:30 - 24 July, 2016
10 Steps to Simplify Your Firm's Transition to BIM, OHSU/PSU/OSU Collaborative Life Sciences Building by SERA Architects and CO Architects. Image © SERA Architects
OHSU/PSU/OSU Collaborative Life Sciences Building by SERA Architects and CO Architects. Image © SERA Architects

So you’re convinced that BIM will be a good addition to your firm. Unlike more conventional CAD, BIM is composed of intelligent 3D models which make critical design and construction processes such as coordination, communication, and collaboration much easier and faster. However, for these reasons BIM is also seen by many as a more complicated software with a steep learning curve, with the potential to take a large chunk out of a firm’s operating budget during the transition period. So how do you actually transition an entire firm’s process to BIM? Here are ten steps to guide you on your way.

This Brooklyn Theater Renovation Shows You Don't Have to Choose Between Heritage and Sustainability

09:30 - 23 July, 2016
This Brooklyn Theater Renovation Shows You Don't Have to Choose Between Heritage and Sustainability, The exterior view of St. Ann’s Warehouse theater. Image Courtesy of Charcoalblue
The exterior view of St. Ann’s Warehouse theater. Image Courtesy of Charcoalblue

This article was originally published on Autodesk's Line//Shape//Space publication as "Energy Efficiency in Historic Buildings: Why a Theater Company Chose Resurrection (Not Demolition)."

For a ruined Civil War-era warehouse in Brooklyn, there may have been no better organization than an avant-garde theater group to think creatively about its future.

Situated in the shadow of the Brooklyn Bridge in the popular Dumbo neighborhood, the 1860 tobacco warehouse was crumbling and forgotten when St. Ann’s, a 36-year-old theater company that began life in another Brooklyn church, sought to renovate it for its first permanent home. Attaining energy efficiency in historic buildings is not just possible—it can be the most sustainable and aesthetic choice.

St. Ann’s, led by artistic director Susan Feldman, hired a building team that included Marvel ArchitectsBuroHappold Engineering; and Charcoalblue, a theater, lighting, and acoustics consultancy. The resulting 25,000-square-foot complex, St. Ann’s Warehouse, includes two versatile and changeable performance spaces, lobby and event areas, and a triangular garden (designed by landscape architects Michael Van Valkenburgh Associates).

AR Issues: How the Internet Has Promoted the Banality of "Notopia"

09:30 - 22 July, 2016
AR Issues: How the Internet Has Promoted the Banality of "Notopia" , Courtesy of The Architectural Review
Courtesy of The Architectural Review

ArchDaily is continuing our partnership with The Architectural Review, bringing you short introductions to the themes of the magazine’s monthly editions. In this introduction to the July 2016 issue, Editor Christine Murray continues the crusade, begun in the previous issue, against "Notopia." Here, Murray describes Notopia's connection to our 21st century digital society, arguing that "the failed promise of the internet is how it has hurt the real world."

It may be found even in an attractive metropolis, densely packed with fine buildings old and new, replete with coffee shops and bicycle lanes. Here, Notopia is a simulacrum of inhabitation, like a stage set for its players. Nothing is what it seems. The historic apartments that overlook the twisted pedestrianized lanes of Barcelona are in fact hotel rooms for weekend visitors. The towering sea-view condominiums of Vancouver are foreign investment properties bought in exchange for citizenship. Detroit’s streets of elegant gabled houses have no services, the municipal water systems long turned off.

Why Islamic Architecture in the United States is Failing American Muslims

09:30 - 21 July, 2016

This essay by Jenine Kotob was originally published by Metropolis Magazine as "Why Now, More Than Ever, We Need A New Islamic Architecture."

At a time when Muslims find themselves at the center of the nation’s political stage, the topic of Islamic architecture in the United States is more relevant than ever. The American mosque has become a prominent symbol, within which identities, practices, and cultures converge. More often than not, this convergence results in conflicting goals, further resulting in mosques that fail to identify and serve the needs of their diverse constituents.