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James Corner Field Operations Chosen to Design Miami “Underline”

High Line co-designer, James Corner Field Operations has been selected to design the proposed 10-mile “Underline” in Miami. Chosen by a local jury from 19 submitted entries, JCFO has been asked to envision a bicycle route and linear park that will replace the threadbare M-Path under the Metrorail tracks from Dadeland to the Miami River. The project has yet to achieve funding, but it is hoped that JCFO’s plan will spark more investor interest. 

Garden Pavilion / Robert Edson Swain Architecture + Design

Courtesy of Robert Edson Swain Architecture + Design Courtesy of Robert Edson Swain Architecture + Design Courtesy of Robert Edson Swain Architecture + Design Courtesy of Robert Edson Swain Architecture + Design

Your Home by Mail: The Rise and Fall of Catalogue Housing

Housing is one of the most persistent challenges faced by the construction industry, and over the course of decades certain trends rise and fall, as entrepreneurial housing providers carve out new niches to provide for expanding populations and changing demographics. Originally published by BuzzBuzzHome as "The Rise and Fall of The Mail-Order House," this article explores the craze of so-called "catalogue homes" - flat-packed houses that were delivered by mail - which became popular in North America in the first decades of the 20th century.

The testimonials make it sound effortless: building your own house is no sweat.

In the front pages of a 1921 Sears Roebuck catalogue for mail-order homes, a resident of Traverse City, Michigan identified only by the pseudonym “I Did Not Hire Any Help” wrote to the company: “I am very well pleased with my Already Cut House bought off you. All the material went together nicely. In fact, I wish I had another house to put up this summer. I really enjoyed working on such a building, and I do not follow the carpenter trade either.” It’s estimated that more than 100,000 mail-order homes were built in the United States between 1908 and 1940. It was the IKEA of housing, but instead of spending an afternoon putting together a bookshelf, buyers would take on the formidable task of building a house. Or, more commonly, get a contractor to do it. Homebuyers would pick a design of their choice out of a mail-order catalogue and the materials – from the lumber frame boards to the paint to the nails and screws – would be shipped out to the closest railway station for pickup and construction.

Gordon Van-Tine homes (1926). Image Courtesy of Openlibrary.org Gordon Van-Tine’s ready-cut homes (1918). Image Courtesy of Openlibrary.org Honor bilt modern homes (1921). Image Courtesy of Openlibrary.org Sears, Roebuck & Co. (1938). Image Courtesy of Openlibrary.org

Frederic Malle / Steven Holl Architects

  • Architects: Steven Holl Architects
  • Location: 94 Greenwich Avenue, New York, NY 10011, USA
  • Architect in Charge: Steven Holl
  • Associate in Charge: Olaf Schmidt
  • Area: 37.0 sqm
  • Project Year: 2014
  • Photographs: Susan Wides, Aislinn Weidele

© Susan Wides © Aislinn Weidele © Susan Wides © Susan Wides

David Chipperfield Chosen to Expand New York's Met Museum

The Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York has tapped British architect David Chipperfield to design its new Southwest Wing for modern and contemporary art. The commission, a result of an international competition, aims to increase gallery space, double the size of the museum’s popular roof garden, and establish accessible on-site storage. “The new design will also enhance gallery configuration and visitor navigation throughout the Southwest Wing, and support a more open dialogue between the Museum and Central Park,” says the architects. 

Whitetail Woods Regional Park Camper Cabins / HGA Architects and Engineers

  • Architects: HGA Architects and Engineers
  • Location: Dakota County, MN, USA
  • Area: 227.0 ft2
  • Project Year: 2014
  • Photographs: Paul Crosby, Pete VondeLinde

© Pete VondeLinde © Paul Crosby © Paul Crosby © Paul Crosby

Family Retreat / Salmela Architect

  • Architects: Salmela Architect
  • Location: Herbster, WI 54844, USA
  • Principal Architect: David Salmela FAIA
  • Project Architect: David Getty
  • Area: 1280.0 ft2
  • Photographs: Paul Crosby

© Paul Crosby © Paul Crosby © Paul Crosby © Paul Crosby

Frank Gehry to Redesign the “Gateway to Sunset Strip”

An overlooked strip mall at the corner of Sunset and Crescent Heights boulevards will soon be replaced by a mixed-use, walkable community designed by Frank Gehry. Known to be the “gateway to the Sunset Strip,” the West Hollywood site will be comprised of 249 apartments, restaurants, retail storefronts and a central plaza - all within "an environmentally sensitive building that complements and contributes to the historic architecture in the neighborhood.”

“Frank Gehry’s deep understanding of the property, its history and the context will elevate the project to the iconic and timeless status that it deserves,” said Townscape partner and project developer Tyler Siegel.

CALS Children’s Library / Polk Stanley Wilcox Architects

© Tim Hursley © Tim Hursley © Tim Hursley © Tim Hursley

MoMA PS1 YAP 2015 Runner-up: Roof Deck / Erin Besler

Despite Andrés Jaque of Office of Political Innovation emerging as the winner of the 2015 MoMA PS1 Young Architects Program (YAP), his competitors put up quite a fight. One of this year's five shortlisted proposals, Erin Besler's Roof Deck breathes life into arguably the most overlooked aspect of architecture - the roof - by injecting it with an active public program and making it a vessel for summer celebration. 

Read on after the break for more on Besler's proposal.

Site Model. Image by Walker Olesen Courtyard during warm-up. Image Courtesy of Erin Besler Roof programming area. Image by Walker Olesen Roof Deck during warm-up: night. Image Courtesy of Erin Besler

Reclaimed Modern / Julian Weber Architects

© Tucker English © Tucker English © Tucker English © Tucker English

Preservationists Lose Battle to Save Orange County Government Center

Yesterday Orange County legislators decided to “take no action” against blocking the “destructive” rebuild of Paul Rudolph’s Orange County Government Center. The plan, deemed by architecture critic Michael Kimmelman to be “vandalism,” will remove one of the building’s three sections and replace it with a “big, soulless glass box.” 

The 44-year-old brutalist landmark has been the center of a preservation debate for years; lawmakers argue that the building is “not easy to love” and expensive to maintain, while preservationists declare the building is an important piece of modern history and blame its state of disrepair on neglect. The council vetoed an offer last summer to allow a New York architect to purchase the property and transform it into artist studios. More on the decision, and more of Matthew Carbone's images for Architect Magazine, after the break.

Latin America in Construction: Architecture 1955-1980

In 1955 the Museum of Modern Art staged Latin American Architecture since 1945, a landmark survey of modern architecture in Latin America. On the 60th anniversary of that important show, the Museum returns to the region to offer a complex overview of the positions, debates, and architectural creativity from Mexico and Cuba to the Southern Cone between 1955 and the early 1980s.

More about Latin America in Construction: Architecture 1955-1980, opening at MoMA on March 29th, after the break. 

 Miguel Rodrigo Mazuré (Peruvian, 1926–2014). (Peruvian, 1926–2014). Hotel in Machu Picchu, Machu Picchu (Project). 1969. Perspective. © Archivo Miguel Rodrigo Mazuré  Lúcio Costa and Oscar Niemeyer. Plaza of the three powers, Brasilia, Brazil, 1958-1960. Photograph: Leonardo Finotti © Leonardo Finotti  National School of Plastic Arts, Havana, Cuba, Ricardo Porro, 1961-1965. © Archivo Vittorio Garatti Brasilia under construction, 1957. Geofoto. Arquivo Publico do Distrito Federal

Renton House / Stettler Design

  • Architects: Stettler Design
  • Location: Renton, WA, USA
  • Project Team: Daniel Stettler, Will Payne
  • Lot Area: 3,500 sq. ft.
  • Area: 3500.0 ft2
  • Project Year: 2011
  • Photographs: Dale Lang

© Dale Lang © Dale Lang © Dale Lang © Dale Lang

Fate of Paul Rudolph’s Orange County Government Center to be Decided Tomorrow

Tomorrow legislators are due to decided the fate of Paul Rudolph’s Orange County Government Center. The midcentury icon, listed on the World Monuments Fund’s global watch list, has been the center of a prolonged debate challenging its right to be preserved. 

The Cardinal / Modus Studio

  • Architects: Modus Studio
  • Location: 831 West Center Street, Fayetteville, AR 72701, USA
  • Principal Architect: Chris M. Baribeau, AIA
  • Area: 370605.0 ft2
  • Project Year: 2014
  • Photographs: Timothy Hursley

© Timothy Hursley © Timothy Hursley © Timothy Hursley © Timothy Hursley

Walter Netsch: The "Radical Mind" That Designed SOM's Air Force Academy Chapel

Having joined Skidmore, Owings & Merrill after World War Two at the age of 27, Walter Netsch was promoted to become a partner at the age of 31. Netsch entered the firm during what was arguably its defining era, when the reputation of Gordon Bunshaft and the image of a corporate-driven, teamwork-minded made SOM one of the most recognizable practices in the US. He was also, at the age of just 34, responsible for one of SOM's most recognizable projects of the decade, the Air Force Academy in Colorado Springs and its striking geometric chapel.

To honor what would have been Netsch's 95th birthday, SOM recently republished an interview between Netsch and architecture theorist and writer Detlef Mertins, which had originally been published in 2001 in SOM Journal 1. In the following extract from this interview, Netsch discusses the story of how he developed the design, and what it was like to participate in one of America's most influential practices among a host of strong characters.

© William Lukes Workers prepare the glass strips for installation in the chapel. Image © SOM © William Lukes © SOM

SteelHouse 1 and 2 / Zack | de Vito Architecture

© Bruce Damonte © Bruce Damonte © Bruce Damonte © Paul Dyer