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Culturehouse in Arnhem / Neutelings Riedijk Architects

© Scagliola, Brakkee © Neutelings Riedijk Architects
© Scagliola, Brakkee © Neutelings Riedijk Architects
  • Architects: Neutelings Riedijk Architects
  • Location: Arnhem, The Netherlands
  • Area: 12000.0 sqm
  • Project Year: 2013
  • Photographs: Scagliola, Brakkee © Neutelings Riedijk Architects

© Scagliola, Brakkee © Neutelings Riedijk Architects © Scagliola, Brakkee © Neutelings Riedijk Architects © Scagliola, Brakkee © Neutelings Riedijk Architects © Scagliola, Brakkee © Neutelings Riedijk Architects

Amsterdam Metro Station / Maccreanor Lavington Architects

Courtesy of Maccreanor Lavington Courtesy of Maccreanor Lavington Courtesy of Maccreanor Lavington Courtesy of Maccreanor Lavington

Rijksmuseum Revisited: The Dutch National Museum One Year On

The Rijksmuseum, which reopened last year after a decade of restoration and remodelling, is a museum dedicated to “the Dutchness of Dutchness.” Pierre Cuypers, the building's original architect, began designing this neogothic cathedral to Dutch art in 1876; it opened in 1885 and has stood guard over Amsterdam's Museumplein ever since.

Over the centuries, the building suffered a series of poorly executed 'improvements': intricately frescoed walls and ceilings were whitewashed; precious mosaics broken; decorative surfaces plastered over; and false, parasitic ceilings hung from the walls. Speaking in his office overlooking the Rijksmuseum’s monumental south west façade, Director of Collections Taco Dibbits noted how the most appalling damage was incurred during the mid-20th century: “everything had been done to hide the original building […but] Cruz y Ortiz [who won the competition to redesign the Rijks in 2003] embraced the existing architecture by going back to the original volumes of the spaces as much as possible.” 

For Seville-based Cruz y Ortiz, choosing what to retain and what to restore, what to remodel and what to ignore were, at times, difficult to balance. Cruz y Ortiz found their answer in the mantra: 'Continue with Cuypers'. They threw the original elements of the building into relief but did not act as aesthetes for the 'ruin'. In contrast to David Chipperfield and Julian Harrap's restoration of Berlin's Neues Museum, for instance, Cruz y Ortiz rigorously implemented a clean visual approach that favoured clarity over confusion. What is original, what is restored, and what is new mingle together in a melting pot of solid, understated architectural elements. Sometimes this approach contradicted Cuyper's original intentions; however, more often than not it complements them in a contemporary way.

Courtesy of Rijksmuseum. Image © John Lewis Marshall Courtesy of Rijksmuseum / Great Hall. Image © Jannes Linders Courtesy of Rijksmuseum / Gallery of Honour. Image © Iwan Baan Courtesy of Rijksmuseum / Cuyper's Library Restored. Image © Iwan Baan

Culture House Eemhuis / Neutelings Riedijk Architects

  • Architects: Neutelings Riedijk Architects
  • Location: Eemplein, Amersfoort, The Netherlands
  • Area: 16000.0 sqm
  • Project Year: 2014
  • Photographs: Courtesy of Scagliolabrakke, Neutelings Riedijk Architecten

Courtesy of Scagliolabrakke, Neutelings Riedijk Architecten Courtesy of Scagliolabrakke, Neutelings Riedijk Architecten Courtesy of Scagliolabrakke, Neutelings Riedijk Architecten Courtesy of Scagliolabrakke, Neutelings Riedijk Architecten

Nieuw Leyden Block / Arons en Gelauff Architecten

© Luuk Kramer © Luuk Kramer © Luuk Kramer © Luuk Kramer

KPN Dutch Telecom Company / de Jong Gortemaker Algra Architects

© Christian Richters
© Christian Richters

© Christian Richters © Christian Richters © Christian Richters © Christian Richters

Kavel K / Carve

  • Architects: Carve
  • Location: The Hague, The Netherlands
  • Carve Team: Elger Blitz, Mark van der Eng, Thomas Tiel Groenestege, Emma Kaul, Thijs van der Zouwen, Hannah Schubert
  • Area: 1650.0 sqm
  • Project Year: 2014
  • Photographs: Marleen Beek

© Marleen Beek © Marleen Beek © Marleen Beek © Marleen Beek

Villa Kavel 01 / Studioninedots

  • Architects: Studioninedots
  • Location: Amsterdam, The Netherlands
  • Architects in Charge: Albert Herder, Vincent van der Klei, Arie van der Neut en Metin van Zijl.
  • Area: 379.0 sqm
  • Project Year: 2014
  • Photographs: Peter Cuypers

© Peter Cuypers © Peter Cuypers © Peter Cuypers © Peter Cuypers

G-Star RAW HQ / OMA

  • Architects: OMA
  • Location: Joan Muyskenweg 39, 1099 Amsterdam, The Netherlands
  • Architect in Charge: Rem Koolhaas, Reinier de Graaf, Ellen van Loon
  • Current Team (construction + interiors): Katrien van Dijk (project leader), Tjeerd van de Sandt, Saskia Simon, Marina Cogliani, Jung-Won Yoon
  • Area: 19000.0 sqm
  • Project Year: 2014
  • Photographs: Courtesy of OMA - G-Star

Courtesy of OMA - G-Star Courtesy of OMA - G-Star Courtesy of OMA - G-Star Courtesy of OMA - G-Star

Google Amsterdam / DDOCK

  • Architects: DDOCK
  • Location: 1082 MD Amsterdam, The Netherlands
  • Area: 3000.0 sqm
  • Project Year: 2014
  • Photographs: Alan Jensen

© Alan Jensen © Alan Jensen © Alan Jensen © Alan Jensen

Fire Station Doetinchem / Bekkering Adams architects

  • Architects: Bekkering Adams architects
  • Location: Stokhorstweg 1, 7006 GA Doetinchem, The Netherlands
  • Design Team: Monica Adams, Juliette Bekkering, Perry Klootwijk, Esther Vlasveld, Frank Venhorst, Zuzana Kuldova, Pia Fischer, Stefania Masuino, Gerard Heerink, Magda Strak
  • Area: 3600.0 sqm
  • Photographs: Ossip van Duivenbode

© Ossip van Duivenbode © Ossip van Duivenbode © Ossip van Duivenbode © Ossip van Duivenbode

Rem Koolhaas' Current Fascinations: On Identity, Asia, the Biennale, & More

In this interview, originally published in The Architectural Review, Andrew Mackenzie sits down with OMA founder Rem Koolhaas to discuss the Venice Biennale, the extinction of national identities, his fascination with Asia, the link between De Rotterdam and Delirious New York, and the future of the profession.

Your proposition for this year’s Venice Architecture Biennale asks whether national identity has been, as you say, ‘sacrificed to modernity’. Some might view this as a project of reclamation, not unlike Frampton’s regionalism. How would you differentiate your proposition from Frampton’s?

Well, Kenneth Frampton is a smart guy, but the problem is that he looked at regionalism as an antidote to cosmopolitan development. In so doing he perverted the cause of regionalism, because suddenly regionalism was mobilised as a private cause that it couldn’t sustain. However, the question of national identity is an open one. For instance, at first sight the Netherlands is a very internationalist country, but looking closely you can see an enormous return of, not vernacular, but quasi-vernacular architecture and quasi-old fortresses that are newly built with a national flavour. Look at Zaandam, and that huge assemblage of so-called vernacular buildings.

Energy Carousel Dordrecht / Ecosistema Urbano Architects

  • Architects: Ecosistema Urbano Architects
  • Location: Oud-Krispijn, Dordrecht, The Netherlands
  • Architects in Charge: Belinda Tato, Jose Luis Vallejo (ecosistema urbano architects)
  • Design Team: Jaime Eizaguirre, Luisa Zancada, Johannes Kettler, Masatoshi Oka, Francesco Cingolani
  • Photographs: Emilio P. Doiztua

© Emilio P. Doiztua © Emilio P. Doiztua © Emilio P. Doiztua © Emilio P. Doiztua

Lely Campus / ConsortArchitects

© Samual Ashfield © Samual Ashfield © Samual Ashfield © Samual Ashfield

KAAN Tapped to Transform Heritage Site into Dutch Think Tank

The Hague government officials have named KAAN Architecten’s design for the Facilicom Consortium PPS B30 as winner of the PPP contract for the Bezuidenhoutseweg 30 project. Originally built in 1917 for the Department of Agriculture, Nature Management and Fisheries, KAAN is expected to transform the existing National Heritage Site facilities into a vibrant and open “modern day think tank” for the Dutch government. 

Country House Goedereede / Korteknie Stuhlmacher Architecten

© Luuk Kramer © Luuk Kramer © Luuk Kramer © Luuk Kramer

Rotterdam Unveils Mirrored, MVRDV-Designed Art Depot for Museumpark

The City of Rotterdam has unveiled MVRDV’s competition winning design for a new public art depot in Rotterdam’s Museumpark. Clad in a highly reflective glass, the cylindrical BREEAM Excellent-planned “Collection Building” will store the “precious art collection of Rotterdam” as well as offer commercial interior storage for private collectors. It is designed to expose the inter workings of a museum, winding visitors up a public route, past storage rooms and restoration workshops, to a rooftop exhibition space, sculpture garden and restaurant.

AD Classics: Kubuswoningen / Piet Blom

A popular tourist attraction and bizarre architectural experiment, the Kubuswoningen is located in the Oude Haven, the most historic section of Rotterdam’s port. Following the destruction of the Oude Haven during the Second World War, architect Piet Blom was asked to redevelop the area with architecture of character, presenting him the opportunity to apply his earlier cube housing exploration in Helmond to a more urban context.  Known for his desire to challenge conventions, Blom did not want the Kubuswoningen to resemble typical housing; he strived to dissolve the attitude that “a building has to be recognizable as a house for it to qualify as housing.”  During a time when the rebuilding of Rotterdam was pivotal, the Kubuswoningen served as an influential precedent for progressive and innovative architectural development.  

© Dirk Verwoerd © Dirk Verwoerd © Dirk Verwoerd © Dirk Verwoerd