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Video: Reiulf Ramstad Explains "The Nordic Way of Building"

10:00 - 21 June, 2016

“We believe that architecture makes sense when it’s anchored in the locales where it’s built, and the people who are going to use it. That’s why I’m not so occupied with the zeitgeist of architecture.”

In this interview from Louisiana Channel, Oslo-based architect Reiulf Ramstad discusses how the Scandinavian landscape is at the core of his design concepts. In a context of globalization, increased mobility, and communication medias, Ramstad believes “the depth of the locale becomes shallow.” His architecture contrasts this mainstream approach by offering designs specifically tailored to Norwegian cultural heritage and the landscape of its remote areas.

Småbruk: Pocket Farm in Nes / Scarcity and Creativity Studio

02:00 - 17 June, 2016
Småbruk: Pocket Farm in Nes / Scarcity and Creativity Studio, Courtesy of Scarcity and Creativity Studio
Courtesy of Scarcity and Creativity Studio

Courtesy of Scarcity and Creativity Studio Courtesy of Scarcity and Creativity Studio Courtesy of Scarcity and Creativity Studio Courtesy of Scarcity and Creativity Studio +19

Sirdalen House / Filter Arkitekter

05:00 - 16 June, 2016
Sirdalen House / Filter Arkitekter, © Lise Bjelland
© Lise Bjelland

© Lise Bjelland © Lise Bjelland © Lise Bjelland © Lise Bjelland +13

Tintra Footbridge / Rintala Eggertsson Architects

03:00 - 13 June, 2016
Tintra Footbridge / Rintala Eggertsson Architects, © Dag Jenssen
© Dag Jenssen

© Dag Jenssen © Dag Jenssen © Dag Jenssen © Dag Jenssen +40

  • Architects

    Dagur Eggertsson, Vibeke Jenssen, Sami Rintala and Polona Šušterič
  • Location

    Vossevangen, Norway
  • Contractor

    IKM Stål & Fasade
  • Area

    306.0 sqm
  • Project Year

    2015
  • Photographs

In Therapy: Inside the Nordic Pavilion at the 2016 Venice Biennale

04:15 - 31 May, 2016
In Therapy: Inside the Nordic Pavilion at the 2016 Venice Biennale, The central installation (the pyramid) is encloses, but does not hide, the three remaining original trees inside the pavilion. Image © Laurian Ghinitoiu
The central installation (the pyramid) is encloses, but does not hide, the three remaining original trees inside the pavilion. Image © Laurian Ghinitoiu

As part of ArchDaily's coverage of the 2016 Venice Biennale, we are presenting a series of articles written by the curators of the exhibitions and installations on show.

You are part of another’s shadow.
—Sverre Fehn in conversation with Per Olaf Fjeld

A central impetus for this exhibition is to acknowledge the presence of the ‘ghosts’ of Nordic architecture – those architects, theorists and educators—the most famous of which are often described as ‘Modern Masters’—who continue to exert influence on contemporary practice and pedagogy. Indeed, one of the most prominent of these gures, the Norwegian Sverre Fehn, designed the Nordic Pavilion. This exhibition addresses a common challenge faced by Finns, Norwegians and Swedes today: how can a building (or an exhibition, in this instance) exist in a dialogue with its setting when that setting is so charged? For us, this ties into a broader question: how can architecture occupy a legacy while still making progress?

The pyramid, built from Swedish pine, represents an inhabitable installation – an urban artefact in a very public pavilion. Image © Laurian Ghinitoiu Intimate "Rooms Without Walls" sit next to the main installation. Image © Laurian Ghinitoiu The pyramid is a "discourse machine," designed to allow people to critically discuss the issues at the heart of the exhibition in an open air environment. Image © Laurian Ghinitoiu The pyramid exists in dialogue with the building. Here, it's relationship with the existing staircase is made apparent. Image © Laurian Ghinitoiu +42

Oslo Architecture Triennale Announces Program and Participants for 2016 Event

14:30 - 24 May, 2016
Oslo Architecture Triennale Announces Program and Participants for 2016 Event, Courtesy of Oslo Architecture Triennale
Courtesy of Oslo Architecture Triennale

The Oslo Architecture Triennale has announced the program and participants for this year's sixth edition of the event, titled After Belonging, which will open in September of this year. Participants will contribute to two exhibitions, occurring alongside a conference, and collateral events, taking place September 8-November 27, 2016.

As described by the Oslo Architecture Triennale website: "The 2016 Oslo Architecture Triennale designs the objects, spaces, and territories for a transforming condition of belonging. Global circulation of people, information, and goods has destabilized what we understand by residence, questioning spatial permanence, property, and identity—a crisis of belonging. Circulation brings greater accessibility to ever-new commodities and further geographies. But, simultaneously, circulation also promotes growing inequalities for large groups, kept in precarious states of transit. After Belonging examines both our attachment to places and collectivities—Where do we belong?—as well as our relation to the objects we own, share, and exchange—How do we manage our belongings?”

Cabin Straumsnes / Rever & Drage Architects

05:00 - 18 May, 2016
Cabin Straumsnes  / Rever & Drage Architects, © Tom Auger
© Tom Auger

© Tom Auger © Tom Auger © Tom Auger © Tom Auger +17

  • Architects

  • Location

    Straumsnes, Tingvoll, Norway
  • Design Team

    Tom Auger, Martin Beverfjord, Eirik Lilledrange
  • Area

    135.0 sqm
  • Project Year

    2015
  • Photographs

After Belonging Agency Announce Conference Speakers for the 2016 Oslo Architecture Triennale

07:00 - 25 April, 2016
2016 Oslo Architecture Triennale Conference
2016 Oslo Architecture Triennale Conference

The After Belonging Agency, the curatorial team behind the 2016 Oslo Architecture Triennale (OAT), have revealed sixteen speakers who will present at the event's central conference at the Oslo Opera House this coming September. Atelier Bow-Wow, Snøhetta alongside a number of other academics, practitioners and decision-makers will come together to "address architecture’s relation to current pressing questions such as refugeeism, migration and homelessness, new mediated forms of domesticity and foreignness, environmental displacements, tourism, and the technologies and economies of sharing."

Smestad Recycling Centre / Longva arkitekter

15:00 - 21 April, 2016
Smestad Recycling Centre  / Longva arkitekter , © Ivan Brodey
© Ivan Brodey

© Ivan Brodey © Ivan Brodey © Ivan Brodey © Ivan Brodey +13

Cabin Vindheim / Vardehaugen

03:00 - 20 April, 2016
Cabin Vindheim / Vardehaugen, © Rasmus Norlander
© Rasmus Norlander

© Rasmus Norlander © Rasmus Norlander © Rasmus Norlander © Rasmus Norlander +16

  • Architects

  • Location

    Lillehammer, Norway
  • Team

    Håkon Matre Aasarød, Berta Gaztelu, Joana Branco, Kurt Breitenstein
  • Area

    65.0 sqm
  • Project Year

    2016
  • Photographs

Lars Backer – A Pioneer of Norwegian Modernism

07:00 - 14 April, 2016
 Lars Backer – A Pioneer of Norwegian Modernism, Lars Backer, Restaurant Skansen, Oslo, 1927. Photo: Platou arkitekter
Lars Backer, Restaurant Skansen, Oslo, 1927. Photo: Platou arkitekter

With his designs for Skansen Restaurant, Ekeberg Restaurant and the Horn Building, the architect Lars Backer brought the International Style in architecture to Norway. Many people had felt that a new era was imminent, and now it had arrived.

The exhibition “Lars Backer – architect. A pioneer of Norwegian Modernism” tells the story of Lars Backer’s life, explains his contribution to Norwegian architecture, and sheds light on the era he lived in.

Villa Tussefaret / Lie Øyen Arkitekter

02:00 - 12 April, 2016
Villa Tussefaret  / Lie Øyen Arkitekter, © Fin Serck-Hanssen
© Fin Serck-Hanssen

© Fin Serck-Hanssen © Nils Petter Dale © Nils Petter Dale © Fin Serck-Hanssen +23

  • Architects

    Lie Øyen arkitekter as
  • Location

    Tussefaret 19, 1440 Drøbak, Norway
  • Project leader

    Kristoffer Øyen
  • Area

    60.0 sqm
  • Project Year

    2014
  • Photographs

AD Classics: Nordic Pavilion in Venice / Sverre Fehn

09:00 - 30 March, 2016
AD Classics: Nordic Pavilion in Venice / Sverre Fehn, The Nordic Pavilion (Giardini, Venice). Image © Åke E:son Lindman
The Nordic Pavilion (Giardini, Venice). Image © Åke E:son Lindman

Three were originally invited to draw up plans for a ‘Nordic’ pavilion: the Finnish partnership Reima and Raili Pietilä, Sverre Fehn from Norway, and the Swede, Klas Anshelm. Following the selection of Fehn’s proposal in 1959, Gotthard Johansson wrote in the Svenska Dagbladet of the project’s “stunning simplicity [...], without too many architectural overtones”[1] – a proposal for a space able to unite a triumvirate of nations under one (exceptional) roof.

The Nordic Pavilion (Giardini, Venice). Image © Åke E:son Lindman The Nordic Pavilion (Giardini, Venice). Image © Åke E:son Lindman The Nordic Pavilion (Giardini, Venice). Image © Åke E:son Lindman The Nordic Pavilion (Giardini, Venice). Image © Åke E:son Lindman +30

House in Stavanger / Austigard Arkitektur

09:00 - 26 March, 2016
House in Stavanger / Austigard Arkitektur, © Austigard Arkitetur AS + Emile Ashley
© Austigard Arkitetur AS + Emile Ashley

© Austigard Arkitetur AS + Emile Ashley © Austigard Arkitetur AS + Emile Ashley © Austigard Arkitetur AS + Emile Ashley © Austigard Arkitetur AS + Emile Ashley +23

120 Hours Announces Winners of Its 2016 Competition "What Ever Happened to Architectural Space?"

14:00 - 22 March, 2016
120 Hours Announces Winners of Its 2016 Competition "What Ever Happened to Architectural Space?", Florilegium. Image via 120 Hours
Florilegium. Image via 120 Hours

The student architecture competition “120 Hours” has released the winners of its 2016 competition—“What Ever Happened to Architectural Space?”—which this year challenged entrants to imagine a space without program or site. In a time when the discourse of architecture is influenced more by program and environment than spatial quality, the brief was uniquely challenging in its simplicity. Entries were received from over 2863 students from 72 countries, with winners selected by a jury headed by Christian Kerez and including Maria Shéhérazade Giudici, Beate Hølmebakk, Neven Mikac Fuchs and Marina Montresor.

Originally devised by students in Oslo, the competition format is intended as a way of encouraging discourse among architecture students across the world, with competition briefs released just 120 hours (5 days) before the submission deadline. These unique restrictions have fostered a reputation for unconventional and challenging proposals and winning entries in the past have included giant scaffolds of hammocks and the use of robots to inhabit an abandoned town. Read on to see the top three award recipients for 2016.

AD Classics: Nordic Pavilion at Expo '70 / Sverre Fehn

04:00 - 22 March, 2016
AD Classics: Nordic Pavilion at Expo '70 / Sverre Fehn, Courtesy of Norwegian National Museum
Courtesy of Norwegian National Museum

Though architectural history is replete with bricks, stones, and steel, there is no rule that states that architecture must be ‘solid’. Sverre Fehn, one of the most prominent architects of postwar Norway, regularly made use of heavy materials like concrete and stone masonry in his projects [1]. In this way, his proposal for the Nordic Pavilion at the Osaka World Expo in 1970 could be seen as an atypical exploration of a more delicate structure. Representing a very different aspect of ‘Modernity’ than his usual work, Fehn’s “breathing balloon” pavilion stands not only in contradiction to Fehn’s design canon, but to that of traditional architecture as a whole.

Courtesy of Norwegian National Museum Courtesy of Norwegian National Museum Courtesy of Norwegian National Museum Courtesy of Norwegian National Museum +10

Look Inside a Selection of Danish, Finnish, Norwegian and Swedish Architecture Offices, Photographed by Marc Goodwin

04:00 - 9 March, 2016
Look Inside a Selection of Danish, Finnish, Norwegian and Swedish Architecture Offices, Photographed by Marc Goodwin, Inside the studios of Jägnefält Milton. Image © Marc Goodwin
Inside the studios of Jägnefält Milton. Image © Marc Goodwin

Architectural photographer Marc Goodwin has recently completed "the ultra-marathon of photoshoots:" twenty-eight architectural offices in twenty-eight days, spread across four capital cities – Oslo, Stockholm, Copenhagen, and Helsinki. His aim was to understand what sort of spaces architects in the Nordic countries operate in, and how they differ between each respective country. From former boathouses to stables and coal deposits, Goodwin has captured some of the most unique working environments the profession has to offer.

Studiopuisto. Image © Marc Goodwin Tham & Videgård. Image © Marc Goodwin Leth & Gori. Image © Marc Goodwin Norrøn. Image © Marc Goodwin +33

Cultural Center Stjørdal / Reiulf Ramstad Arkitekter + Lusparken Arkitekter + JSTArkitekter

09:00 - 7 March, 2016
Cultural Center Stjørdal / Reiulf Ramstad Arkitekter + Lusparken Arkitekter + JSTArkitekter, © Søren Harder Nielsen
© Søren Harder Nielsen

© Wensel Prokos © Søren Harder Nielsen via Reiulf Ramstad arkitekter via Reiulf Ramstad arkitekter +36