ArchDaily | Broadcasting Architecture Worldwidethe world's most visited architecture website

Nest / APOLLO Architects

02:00 - 2 April, 2016
Nest / APOLLO Architects, © Masao Nishikawa
© Masao Nishikawa
  • Architects

  • Location

    Nagoya, Aichi Prefecture, Japan
  • Architect in Charge

    Satoshi Kurosaki / APOLLO Architects & Associates
  • Area

    43.45 sqm
  • Project Year

    2015
  • Photographs

© Masao Nishikawa © Masao Nishikawa © Masao Nishikawa © Masao Nishikawa +15

Inagawa Reien Warehouse / Akira Koyama + Key Operation Inc

19:00 - 29 March, 2016
Inagawa Reien Warehouse  / Akira Koyama + Key Operation Inc, © Yasushi Ichikawa
© Yasushi Ichikawa

© Yasushi Ichikawa © Yasushi Ichikawa © Yasushi Ichikawa © Yasushi Ichikawa +38

Inari House / TOKMOTO architectures room

19:00 - 24 March, 2016
Inari House / TOKMOTO architectures room , © Isamu Murai
© Isamu Murai

© Isamu Murai © Isamu Murai © Isamu Murai © Isamu Murai +14

Tadafusa Factory Showroom / Yusuke Seki

20:00 - 22 March, 2016
© Takumi Ota
© Takumi Ota
  • Architects

  • Location

    Niigata Prefecture, Japan
  • Art Direction & Design

    Yusuke Seki
  • Project Year

    2015
  • Photographs

© Takumi Ota © Takumi Ota © Takumi Ota © Takumi Ota +16

AD Classics: Nordic Pavilion at Expo '70 / Sverre Fehn

04:00 - 22 March, 2016
AD Classics: Nordic Pavilion at Expo '70 / Sverre Fehn, Courtesy of Norwegian National Museum
Courtesy of Norwegian National Museum

Though architectural history is replete with bricks, stones, and steel, there is no rule that states that architecture must be ‘solid’. Sverre Fehn, one of the most prominent architects of postwar Norway, regularly made use of heavy materials like concrete and stone masonry in his projects [1]. In this way, his proposal for the Nordic Pavilion at the Osaka World Expo in 1970 could be seen as an atypical exploration of a more delicate structure. Representing a very different aspect of ‘Modernity’ than his usual work, Fehn’s “breathing balloon” pavilion stands not only in contradiction to Fehn’s design canon, but to that of traditional architecture as a whole.

Courtesy of Norwegian National Museum Courtesy of Norwegian National Museum Courtesy of Norwegian National Museum Courtesy of Norwegian National Museum +10

SO/AP Architectes Reveals Tokyo Pop Lab Proposal

08:00 - 19 March, 2016
SO/AP Architectes Reveals Tokyo Pop Lab Proposal , Courtesy of SO/AP Architectes
Courtesy of SO/AP Architectes

SO/AP Architectes has released its proposal for the Tokyo Pop Lab competition, which recently announced its winners. Based on the duality of environmental vulnerability and the omnipresence of numeric technology, the 3,500 square meter design focuses on the battle between mankind and nature.

House in Anjo / Suppose Design Office

20:00 - 17 March, 2016
House in Anjo / Suppose Design Office, © Toshiyuki Yano
© Toshiyuki Yano

© Toshiyuki Yano © Toshiyuki Yano © Toshiyuki Yano © Toshiyuki Yano +12

Kazuyo Sejima Designs New Express Train for Japan

12:28 - 16 March, 2016
Kazuyo Sejima Designs New Express Train for Japan, © Seibu Railway
© Seibu Railway

Kazuyo Sejima is designing a new express train for Japan. Commissioned by Seibu Group, the Limited Express train would be a "friendly" addition to the company's "Red Arrow" series, which so far boasts brightly colored, traditional designs that stand out from the surroundings.

Much like Sejima's architecture, the initial concept reveals a light, semi-transparent design that allows the train to blend into the landscape.

Three Winners Announced for Tokyo Pop Lab Competition

17:00 - 12 March, 2016
Three Winners Announced for Tokyo Pop Lab Competition, First Prize: The team of Attilio De Palma, Andrea Longo, and Enrico Nicli, of Italy. Image Courtesy of Bee Breeders
First Prize: The team of Attilio De Palma, Andrea Longo, and Enrico Nicli, of Italy. Image Courtesy of Bee Breeders

The three winners of the Tokyo Pop Lab competition, which called for the development of an institution for popular culture, have been announced.

Centered on the phenomena of pop culture, the competition examined how “popular culture migrates and changes from person to person and place to place,” and invited entrants “to critically evaluate fundamental correlations between cultural production and architecture.”

Entrants varied in typology from pragmatic to ideological, with successful proposals including “a well considered and articulated definition of popular culture, clarity in representation of both architecture and culture, and a clear programmatic agenda.”

The three winners of the Tokyo Pop Lab competition are:

A Japanese Constellation: Toyo Ito, SANAA, and Beyond

16:00 - 11 March, 2016
A Japanese Constellation: Toyo Ito, SANAA, and Beyond, Sou Fujimoto. House N, Oita, Japan. 2006–08. © Iwan Baan
Sou Fujimoto. House N, Oita, Japan. 2006–08. © Iwan Baan

A Japanese Constellation: Toyo Ito, SANAA, and Beyond focuses on the work of architects and designers orbiting Pritzker Prize winners Toyo Ito and SANAA. MoMA’s first presentation dedicated solely to Japanese practitioners, the exhibition spotlights a small cluster of contemporary Japanese architects working within the larger field, exploring their formal inventiveness and close professional relationships to frame a radical model of practice in the 21st century.

U House / KIAS

19:00 - 10 March, 2016
U House  / KIAS, © Toshiyuki Yano
© Toshiyuki Yano
  • Architects

  • Location

    Chiba, Chiba Prefecture, Japan
  • Architect in Charge

    Kentaro Ishida, Yuji Ito, Miyuki Kakizawa (KIAS)
  • Area

    190.0 sqm
  • Project Year

    2015
  • Photographs

© Toshiyuki Yano © Toshiyuki Yano © Toshiyuki Yano © Toshiyuki Yano +23

Nakagawa Masashichi Shoten Omotesando Shop & Office / Schemata Architects

19:00 - 9 March, 2016
Nakagawa Masashichi Shoten Omotesando Shop & Office  / Schemata Architects, © Kenta Hasegawa
© Kenta Hasegawa
  • Architects

  • Location

    5 Chome-43-7 Jingūmae, Shibuya-ku, Tōkyō-to 150-0001, Japan
  • Architect in Charge

    Jo Nagasaka
  • Design Team

    Masami Nakata, Kosuke Nakano
  • Area

    378.8 sqm
  • Project Year

    2015
  • Photographs

© Kenta Hasegawa © Kenta Hasegawa © Kenta Hasegawa © Kenta Hasegawa +17

Plate / TAKUYAHOSOKAI

20:00 - 8 March, 2016
Plate  / TAKUYAHOSOKAI, © Naomichi Sode
© Naomichi Sode
  • Architects

  • Location

    Niigata, Niigata Prefecture, Japan
  • Architect in Charge

    TAKUYAHOSOKAI
  • Design Team

    Takuya Hosokai, Satoshi Hasebe, James Hull
  • Area

    267.0 sqm
  • Project Year

    2015
  • Photographs

© Naomichi Sode © Naomichi Sode © Naomichi Sode © Naomichi Sode +17

Blues Design Office / D.I.G Architects

22:00 - 7 March, 2016
Blues Design Office  / D.I.G Architects, © Tomohiro Sakashita
© Tomohiro Sakashita
  • Architects

  • Location

    Obu, Aichi Prefecture, Japan
  • Architect in Charge

    Maki + Akinori Yoshimura D.I.G Architects
  • Area

    280.0 sqm
  • Project Year

    2014
  • Photographs

© Tomohiro Sakashita © Tomohiro Sakashita © Tomohiro Sakashita © Tomohiro Sakashita +17

COCREA / bews / building environment workshop

19:00 - 7 March, 2016
COCREA  / bews / building environment workshop, © Satoshi Asakawa
© Satoshi Asakawa

© Satoshi Asakawa © Satoshi Asakawa Courtesy of Bews Courtesy of Bews +25

Vasily Klyukin Proposes Asian Cobra Tower

14:00 - 4 March, 2016
Vasily Klyukin Proposes Asian Cobra Tower, © Vasily Klyukin
© Vasily Klyukin

Russian designer Vasily Klyukin has envisioned the "Asian Cobra Tower." Just as its name suggests, the gold-plated tower takes the shape of a snake, offering offices and apartments in its body and a restaurant, night club and terrace in its jaws. 

"In Japan telling someone that he is a snake means a compliment. In China snakes and dragons often mean the same," says Klyukin. "The symbol of wisdom and eternal life, this tower would embellish any Eastern city."

AM Kindergarten and Nursery / HIBINOSEKKEI + Youji no Shiro

22:00 - 3 March, 2016
AM Kindergarten and Nursery / HIBINOSEKKEI  + Youji no Shiro , © Studio Bauhaus, Ryuji Inoue
© Studio Bauhaus, Ryuji Inoue

© Studio Bauhaus, Ryuji Inoue © Studio Bauhaus, Ryuji Inoue © Studio Bauhaus, Ryuji Inoue © Studio Bauhaus, Ryuji Inoue +17

Shinkoji Temple / Mamiya Shinichi Design Studio

19:00 - 3 March, 2016
Shinkoji Temple  / Mamiya Shinichi Design Studio, © Toshiyuki Yano
© Toshiyuki Yano

© Toshiyuki Yano © Toshiyuki Yano © Toshiyuki Yano © Toshiyuki Yano +13