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House of Shimanto / Keisuke Kawaguchi+K2-Design

  • Architects: Keisuke Kawaguchi+K2-Design
  • Location: Shimanto, Kouchi Prefecture, Japan
  • Project Year: 2012
  • Photographs: Koji Fujii - Nacasa&Partners

© Koji Fujii - Nacasa&Partners © Koji Fujii - Nacasa&Partners © Koji Fujii - Nacasa&Partners © Koji Fujii - Nacasa&Partners

Everybody Finds Somebody Someplace / htmn

© Daici Ano
© Daici Ano
  • Architects: htmn
  • Location: Akishima-shi, Tokyo
  • Architect In Charge: Hiroaki Takada, Nakahata Masayuki
  • Structure Design: Ryo Kuwako, Kuwako
  • Area: 3980.0 sqm
  • Project Year: 2012
  • Photographs: Daici Ano, Courtesy of htmn

Courtesy of htmn © Daici Ano © Daici Ano © Daici Ano

Peanuts / UID Architects

© Hiroshi Ueda
© Hiroshi Ueda
  • Architects: UID Architects
  • Location: Hiroshima,Japan
  • Architect In Charge: Keisuke Maeda
  • Area: 11874.0 sqm
  • Project Year: 2012
  • Photographs: Hiroshi Ueda, Courtesy of Uid Architects

© Hiroshi Ueda © Hiroshi Ueda © Hiroshi Ueda Courtesy of Uid Architects

The Future of Train Travel: Life in Hyper-Speed

Japan, inventor of the world's first bullet train, recently unveiled plans for an even faster and more radical train model: a floating train, powered by magnets, that will travel 100 mph faster than current bullet trains (about 300 mph). The maglev train, standing for "magnetic levitation," will run between Tokyo and Osaka, an estimated distance of 315 miles, cost $64 billion, and be completed by 2045.  

High-speed rail has already revolutionized national and international transportation in many parts of the world - for example, China has a maglev that already goes 270mph - and now high-speed is transitioning into hyper-speed. Last year, we reported that Elon Musk, CEO of SpaceX and co-founder of both PayPal and Tesla Motors, shared with the public his desire to patent a new mode of transportation - the “Hyperloop” that would get passengers from San Francisco to LA in only 30 minutes.

So what might the future hold for train travel? And, more importantly, how will it affect our cities and the people who live in them?

For more on the maglev train and the future of rail, read on.

House M / Keiko Maita Architect

© Yoshiharu Matsumura
© Yoshiharu Matsumura
  • Architects: Keiko Maita Architect
  • Location: Shunan, Japan
  • Architect In Charge: Keiko Maita
  • Area: 107.0 sqm
  • Project Year: 2010
  • Photographs: Yoshiharu Matsumura

© Yoshiharu Matsumura © Yoshiharu Matsumura © Yoshiharu Matsumura © Yoshiharu Matsumura

Serpentine Pavilion / Sou Fujimoto

This Thursday, the official opening of the Serpentine Pavilion, by Sou Fujimoto, took place in Hyde Park, London. It was the first time the public could interact with the structure.

The pavilion, which has already gotten its "cloud" nickname because of its shape and lightness, is generated through a three-dimensional steel grid of about 40 centimetre modules which morphs on each side. The structure is broken to allow people access as well as to generate different uses around, below and upon it. 

More pictures and the architect's statement after the break.

© Daniel Portilla © Daniel Portilla © Daniel Portilla © Daniel Portilla

Video: Studio Beneath the Railway + Step Plaza

Beneath an elevated railway in the former red-light district of Kogane-cho, the city of Yokohama and NPO Koganecho Area Management Center commissioned five architects to transform a 100 to 150 square meter site into what is now a destination for local artists and residents. Each practice - Contemporaries, Studio 2A, Workstation, Koizumi Atelier, and Nishikura Architectural Design Office - was assigned a single project, providing the community with a gallery, cafe, studio, meeting hall for artists, and stepped outdoor plaza. Tour through each space with this video, provided by JA+U

Park House / another APARTMENT

© Koichi Torimura
© Koichi Torimura
  • Architects: another APARTMENT
  • Location: Tokyo, Japan
  • Architect In Charge: Tsuyoshi Kobayashi
  • Area: 27.6 sqm
  • Project Year: 2012
  • Photographs: Koichi Torimura

© Koichi Torimura © Koichi Torimura © Koichi Torimura © Koichi Torimura