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The Unexpected Stories Behind 10 Skyscrapers That Were Actually Built

04:00 - 24 January, 2017
The Unexpected Stories Behind 10 Skyscrapers That Were Actually Built, Torre Velasca. Image © José Tomás Franco
Torre Velasca. Image © José Tomás Franco

As long as there have been buildings mankind has sought to construct its way to the heavens. From stone pyramids to steel skyscrapers, successive generations of designers have devised ever more innovative ways to push the vertical boundaries of architecture. Whether stone or steel, however, each attempt to reach unprecedented heights has represented a vast undertaking in terms of both materials and labor – and the more complex the project, the greater the chance for things to go awry.

Ryugyong Hotel. Image © José Tomás Franco Robot Building. Image © José Tomás Franco CCTV Headquarters. Image © José Tomás Franco Cayan Tower. Image © José Tomás Franco +21

Green Arena / Stradivarie Architetti Associati

20:00 - 21 January, 2017
Green Arena / Stradivarie Architetti Associati, © Gianna Omenetto
© Gianna Omenetto

© Gianna Omenetto © Gianna Omenetto © Gianna Omenetto © Gianna Omenetto +20

  • Architects

  • Location

    Cavallino-Treporti, Metropolitan City of Venice, Italy
  • Architect in Charge

    Claudia Marcon, Adriano Venudo, Diana Lohse, Elisa Monte, Elisa Crosilla, Mariacristina D’Oria
  • Area

    4000.0 m2
  • Project Year

    2015
  • Photographs

Scalo Milano City Style / Metrogramma + Cotefa.ingegneri&architetti

13:00 - 21 January, 2017
Scalo Milano City Style / Metrogramma + Cotefa.ingegneri&architetti, Courtesy of Metrogramma Milano
Courtesy of Metrogramma Milano

Courtesy of Metrogramma Milano         Courtesy of Metrogramma Milano         Courtesy of Metrogramma Milano         Courtesy of Metrogramma Milano         +16

  • Architects

  • Location

    20085 Locate di Triulzi MI, Italy
  • Lead Architects

    Metrogramma, Cotefa.ingegneri&architetti
  • Design Team (Metrogramma)

    Arch. Andrea Boschetti, Arch. Alberto Francini, Arch. Cecilia Gozzi, Ing. Francesco Betta, Arch. Arianna Piva, Arch. Fabio Negri, Arch. Andrea Casazza, Ing. Sara Cheli, Arch. Ana Lazovic, Arch. Tomaso Zito, Dott.ssa Donatella Pirola
  • Design Team (Cotefa ingegneri&architetti)

    Ing. Riccardo Manfredi, Arch. Guillermo Arnaudo, Arch. Sara Ragni, Geom. Maurizio Schinocca, Geom. Mauro Lorenzetti, Arch. Daniela Valsecchi, Arch. Nicola Apostoli, Ing. Francesca Boarini, Geom. Silvana Silistrini, Geom. Lidia Gallupo, Ing. Ermanno Zatti, Ing. Alice Cadeo, Ing. Gianpaolo Beccari, Ing. Andrea Casarino
  • Art Director

    Arch. Andrea Boschetti
  • Area

    60000.0 m2
  • Project Year

    2016
  • Photographs

New BIO Winery / MADE Associati Architetti

11:00 - 20 January, 2017
New BIO Winery  / MADE Associati Architetti, © Francesco Galifi
© Francesco Galifi

© Adriano Marangon © Adriano Marangon © Adriano Marangon © Adriano Marangon +13

Considering the Airport Terminal of Tomorrow

04:00 - 19 January, 2017
Considering the Airport Terminal of Tomorrow, Courtesy of Aerial Futures
Courtesy of Aerial Futures

Aerial Futures, Grounded Visions: Shaping the Airport Terminal of Tomorrow was a two-day symposium held in October 2016 as part of the European Cultural Center's collateral event at the 2016 Venice Biennale. It encouraged discussion about the future of air travel from the perspectives of architecture, design, technology, culture and user experience. The event featured presentations and discussions by the likes of airport architect Curtis FentressNelly Ben YahounDonald Albrecht, Director of the Museum of the City of New York; Anna Gasco, post-doctoral researcher at the ETH-Future Cities Laboratory in Singapore; Jonathan Ledgard, co-founder of the Droneport Project; and Ashok Raiji, Principal at Arup New York.

Courtesy of Aerial Futures Courtesy of Aerial Futures Courtesy of Aerial Futures Courtesy of Aerial Futures +4

Understanding Grafton Architects, Directors of the 2018 Venice Architecture Biennale

04:00 - 18 January, 2017
Understanding Grafton Architects, Directors of the 2018 Venice Architecture Biennale, UTEC / Grafton Architects. Image © Iwan Baan
UTEC / Grafton Architects. Image © Iwan Baan

“When you read Love in the Time of Cholera you come to realize the magic realism of South America.” Yvonne Farrell, Shelley McNamara and I were in a corner of the Barbican Centre’s sprawling, shallow atrium talking about the subject of their most recent accolade, the Royal Institute of British Architects inaugural International Prize, awarded that previous evening. That same night the two Irish architects, who founded their practice in Dublin in the 1970s, also delivered a lecture on the Universidad de Ingeniería and Tecnologia (UTEC)—their “modern-day Machu Picchu” in Lima—to a packed audience in London’s Portland Place.

Farrell and McNamara, who together lead a team of twenty-five as Grafton Architects, are both powerful thinkers, considered conversationalists and unobtrusively groundbreaking designers. For a practice so compact, their international portfolio is exceptionally broad. The first phase of the UTEC in the Peruvian capital, which began following an international competition in 2011, represents the farthest territory the practice have geographically occupied. The project is, in their words, a “man-made cliff” between the Pacific and the mountains – on one side a cascading garden, and on the other a “shoulder” to the city cast from bare concrete.

Jardin de l’Ange / Evastomperstudio

03:00 - 18 January, 2017
Jardin de l’Ange / Evastomperstudio, © Davide Galli
© Davide Galli

© Davide Galli © Davide Galli © Davide Galli © Davide Galli +18

  • Architects

  • Location

    11013 Courmayeur AO, Italy
  • Architect in Charge

    Giovanni Capri
  • Area

    600.0 m2
  • Project Year

    2016
  • Photographs

Spazio Lilt / Ottavio Di Blasi & Partners

09:00 - 15 January, 2017
Spazio Lilt / Ottavio Di Blasi & Partners, © Beppe Raso
© Beppe Raso

© Beppe Raso     © Beppe Raso     © Beppe Raso     © Beppe Raso     +15

Riviera Grand Hotel / Tomas Ghisellini Architects

09:00 - 14 January, 2017
Riviera Grand Hotel / Tomas Ghisellini Architects, © Lucrezia Alemanno
© Lucrezia Alemanno

© Lucrezia Alemanno © Lucrezia Alemanno © Lucrezia Alemanno © Lucrezia Alemanno +22

  • Architects

  • Location

    73050 Santa Maria al Bagno, Province of Lecce, Italy
  • Architect in Charge

    Tomas Ghisellini, Alice Marzola with Lucrezia Alemanno, Daniele Francesco Petralia
  • Client

    CDS Hotels Ltd
  • Area

    10200.0 m2
  • Project Year

    2016
  • Photographs

Refurbishment of an Apartment in the Italian Alps / Philipp Kammerer

05:00 - 14 January, 2017
Refurbishment of an Apartment in the Italian Alps / Philipp Kammerer, © Philipp Kammerer
© Philipp Kammerer

© Philipp Kammerer © Philipp Kammerer © Philipp Kammerer © Philipp Kammerer +11

VGramsci Building / Giovanni Vaccarini Architects

22:01 - 13 January, 2017
VGramsci Building  / Giovanni Vaccarini Architects, © Sergio Camplone
© Sergio Camplone

© Sergio Camplone              © Sergio Camplone              © Sergio Camplone              © Sergio Camplone              +19

Forti Holding Spa HQ and Office Building / ATIproject

13:00 - 13 January, 2017
Forti Holding Spa HQ and Office Building / ATIproject, © Daniele Domenicali
© Daniele Domenicali

© Daniele Domenicali © Irene Taddei © Irene Taddei © Irene Taddei +26

  • Architects

  • Location

    Pisa, Province of Pisa, Italy
  • Architect in Charge

    Arch. Eng Branko Zrnic, Eng. Luca Serri
  • Area

    4750.0 m2
  • Project Year

    2016
  • Photographs

PROTIRO / NOWA

09:00 - 8 January, 2017
PROTIRO / NOWA, © Peppe Maisto
© Peppe Maisto

© Peppe Maisto      © Peppe Maisto      © Peppe Maisto      © Peppe Maisto      +18

  • Architects

  • Location

    95041 Caltagirone, Province of Catania, Italy
  • Architect in Charge

    Marco Navarra
  • Area

    400.0 m2
  • Project Year

    2016
  • Photographs

Italian Architect Leonardo Benevolo Passes Away Aged 93

09:05 - 6 January, 2017
Italian Architect Leonardo Benevolo Passes Away Aged 93, via Laterza's Interview with Leonardo Benevolo (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hzto2DOcTpk)
via Laterza's Interview with Leonardo Benevolo (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hzto2DOcTpk)

Italian media have reported that Leonardo Benevolo, one of Italy's foremost architects, critics, and historians, passed away yesterday at his home in Brescia following a long illness. Benevolo was an enormously influential figure in the field of architectural history who was continuously examining the problems and possibilities of our cities.

His writings—in particular the book History of Modern Architecture—have been widely circulated, translated and taught, and contribute to his legacy as one of the profession's most distinguished architects and educators. 

Venice Isn't Sinking, It's Flooding – And It Needs to Learn How to Swim

06:00 - 3 January, 2017
Venice Isn't Sinking, It's Flooding – And It Needs to Learn How to Swim, Acqua Alta in Piazza San Marco (2016). Image © James Taylor-Foster
Acqua Alta in Piazza San Marco (2016). Image © James Taylor-Foster

“Will you look at that? St. Mark’s Square is flooded!” An Australian day tripper is astonished. “This place is actually sinking,” her friend casually exclaims. They, like so many I’ve overheard on the vaporetti, are convinced that the Venetian islands exist on a precipice between the fragility of their current condition and nothing short of imminent submersion. With catastrophe always around the corner a short break in Venice is more of an extreme adventure trip than a European city-break. If it were true, that is.

Casa San Polo / Massimo Galeotti Architetto

05:00 - 1 January, 2017
Casa San Polo / Massimo Galeotti Architetto, © Francesco Castagna
© Francesco Castagna

© Francesco Castagna  © Francesco Castagna  © Francesco Castagna  © Francesco Castagna  +23

Padiglione della Transumanza / CiminiArchitettura

11:00 - 27 December, 2016
Padiglione della Transumanza / CiminiArchitettura, © Sergio Camplone
© Sergio Camplone

© Sergio Camplone Courtesy of CiminiArchitettura © Sergio Camplone Courtesy of CiminiArchitettura +19

  • Architects

  • Location

    66030 Frisa CH, Italy
  • Architect in Charge

    Remo Cimini
  • Area

    145.0 m2
  • Project Year

    2015
  • Photographs

    Sergio Camplone, Courtesy of CiminiArchitettura

AD Classics: Roman Pantheon / Emperor Hadrian

04:00 - 26 December, 2016
AD Classics: Roman Pantheon / Emperor Hadrian, Courtesy of Flickr user Phil Whitehouse (licensed under CC BY 2.0)
Courtesy of Flickr user Phil Whitehouse (licensed under CC BY 2.0)

Locked within Rome’s labyrinthine maze of narrow streets stands one of the most renowned buildings in the history of architecture. Built at the height of the Roman Empire’s power and wealth, the Roman Pantheon has been both lauded and studied for both the immensity of its dome and its celestial geometry for over two millennia. During this time it has been the subject of countless imitations and references as the enduring architectural legacy of one of the world’s most influential epochs.

The coffers in the Pantheon’s dome, aside from their aesthetic qualities, serve to reduce the weight of the dome on the support structure below. ImageCourtesy of Flickr user Michael Vadon under CC BY 2.0 Courtesy of Flickr user Michael Johnson (licensed under CC BY 2.0) The interior of the Pantheon contains a perfectly spherical volume – a cosmic symbol which triumphantly asserted the authority and might of the Roman Empire. ImageDrawing by Francesco Piraneni. Via Wikimedia user Bkmd under Public Domain Although the original Pantheon built by Marcus Agrippa burned down after his death, Hadrian ordered that its replacement bear an inscription stating that Agrippa had built it as a tribute to his predecessors. ImageCourtesy of Flickr user Michael Johnson under CC BY 2.0 +16