VIDEO: Can Architecture Foster Dignity?

Believing the lack of dignity is a motivator of crime, MASS Design Group has dedicated their fourth Beyond the Building video series to the notion that has the capacity to build peace. Focusing on how the building process can foster dignity, as well as economic and social justice, MASS encourages architects to ask themselves: “How can we use to contribute to peace, conflict resolution, instill dignity, and promote justice?” Watch the video above and share your thoughts on how can go #beyondthebuilding.

Video: Gort Scott Architects

From public places to designer retail spaces: this practice is reimagining London’s architecure. Enjoy this video Crane.tv did with Gort Scott Architects.

Archilapse: The Fragrante House

This time-lapse montage by Ricardo Oliveira Alves Photography explores the passage of light through the Fragrante House, a project in Lisbon, Portugal defined by its skylights and green garden-walls. Excerpts from an with architect Luís Rebelo de Andrade are included, illustrating the many features that make this house unique, and how ’s quality of sunlight adds a natural beauty to the interior.  

VIDEO: Jeanne Gang on Resurrecting a Chicago Landmark

Shoreland, once a prominent destination built for the stars in 1926, stood derelict for years at risk of being erased from Chicago’s built history. This all changed the moment Jeanne Gang of Studio Gang Architects seized an opportunity to restore the monumental building into a highly sought after residential tower.

Provided by our friends at Spirit of Space, the video above takes you through the meticulous process and unique transformation of this historic landmark, highlighting insight by Gang herself and of Silliman Group.

For more on Gang’s design philosophy, watch our recent ArchDaily interview with her after the break…

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VIDEO: 2000 Years of Preservation in London

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Produced by The Bartlett Centre for Advanced Spatial Analysis, this somewhat hypnotic video charts the development of London from its origins as the Roman settlement of Londinium to the present day. It maps the changes in the city’s road network and built environment, and catalogs the thousands of historic structures which are now protected by either listing or scheduling. Among the fascinating thing revealed by the video is how historic events continue to have a profound effect on the city’s built environment: for example a law passed after the Great Fire of London determined that new buildings had to be built from brick, resulting in the large number of Georgian buildings that have survived to the present day.

VIDEO: Kengo Kuma on Architecture, Materials And Music

In Kengo Kuma’s work you may see influences of light, transparency and materiality. But when visiting the Woodbury School of Architecture in San Diego, shared a few of his not so apparent influences, from Frank Lloyd Wright and Louis Kahn to jazz music. Make sure to view “Knowing Kuma” to see the architect’s definition of architecture, materials and more.

Video: Shibaura House by Kazuyo Sejima

As a part of his ongoing film series about Japanese , French architect and filmmaker Vincent Hecht has created this visual exploration of Kazuyo Sejima’s Shibaura House. Completed in 2011, this five story office space is walled almost entirely in glass and features double-height, split level floors that showcase the paths of travel through the building. The building also features a public cafe on the ground floor, and a roof terrace.

VIDEO: Inside A Data Center, The Architecture Of The Cloud

Have you ever wondered where your information goes when you save it to “The Cloud”? The answer is within giant data centers. According to reports, Facebook and Google’s data centers resemble something from Science Fiction, while some could come straight from a Bond flick. In a new short film named Machine, Filmmaker and Visual artist Timo Arnall takes us where few have been granted access, showing the world what “The Cloud” really is – a massive architectural space with extreme demands. To experience the power surging and hear the deafening hum of a data center, check out the trailer above.

VIDEO: I LIKE Orange

ArchDaily has teamed up with Portugal’s Canal 180 to bring you their series I LIKE. Check out episode 11, I LIKE Orange, which features NL Architects and West 8‘s Basketbar, Massimiliano FuksasZenith Strasbourg, Arne Quinze’s The Sequence and Tham & Videgård Arkitekter‘s Moderna Museet Malmö.

I LIKE is an original series on and spatial intervention, developed in a collaboration between Canal 180 and LIKEarchitects atelier. Diogo Aguiar and Teresa Otto have created a chromatic experiment and spatial exercise—organized by color—that reveals some of the most amazing architectural interventions in the world.

Sadly, we’ve reached the final episode of the I LIKE Color series. But stay tuned for more collaborations between Canal 180 and ArchDaily!

Previous episodes in the I LIKE series:

Episode 1 – I LIKE Black
Episode 2 – I LIKE Pink
Episode 3 – I LIKE Purple
Episode 4 – I LIKE Multicolor
Episode 5 – I LIKE Blue
Episode 6 – I LIKE Yellow
Episode 7 – I LIKE Green
Episode 8 – I LIKE Red
Episode 9 – I LIKE White
Episode 10 – I LIKE Transparent

Video: Alvaro Siza Denounces Architecture’s “Hyper-Specialization”

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In this video, produced by Hugo Oliveira, Portuguese architect Álvaro Siza denounces the ”hyper-specialization” of , outlining its academic roots as well as its practical implications for practice. Siza mentions how, in Portugal, a law was considered to limit architects to their specific specialities – exterior architects could not design interiors, for example. According to Siza, this tendency towards “hyper” or over specialization is unfortunate, as it gives rise to the segmentation of the discipline into subcategories - interior , exterior , landscape , etc. - that undermine collaboration and team work.

Also make sure to check out the first part of this interview, where Siza discusses the obsolescence of buildings.

Video: SunnyHills at Minami-Aoyama by Kengo Kuma

As a part of his ongoing film series about Japanese architecture, French architect and filmmaker Vincent Hecht has created this visual exploration of SunnyHills at Minami-Aoyama by Kengo Kuma.  Designed to resemble a bamboo basket, this pineapple cake shop is built using the traditional Japanese joint technique of “Jiigoku-Gumi.”  The wooden latticework is meant to provide visual contrast with the concrete facades of the building’s neighbors.

VIDEO: I LIKE Transparent

ArchDaily has teamed up with Portugal’s Canal 180 to bring you their series I LIKE. Check out episode 10, I LIKE Transparent, which features one of our most popular projects (and Building of the Year Winner), Gijs Van Vaerenbergh‘s Reading Between the Lines. You’ll also see Heatherwick Studio‘s Bleigiessen, Plastique Fantastique‘s FLIPPAT and Numen/For Use’s Tape.

I LIKE is an original series on architecture and spatial intervention, developed in a collaboration between Canal 180 and LIKEarchitects atelier. Diogo Aguiar and Teresa Otto have created a chromatic experiment and spatial exercise—organized by color—that reveals some of the most amazing architectural interventions in the world.

Next week ArchDaily will premier the final installment of I LIKE. Stay tuned!

Previous episodes in the I LIKE series:

Episode 1 – I LIKE Black
Episode 2 – I LIKE Pink
Episode 3 – I LIKE Purple
Episode 4 – I LIKE Multicolor
Episode 5 – I LIKE Blue
Episode 6 – I LIKE Yellow
Episode 7 – I LIKE Green
Episode 8 – I LIKE Red
Episode 9 – I LIKE White

Timelapse Captures 2.5 Year Transformation of Abu Dhabi and Dubai

Humanity’s ability to construct and change an urban landscape is incredible, but rarely do we get to see that interaction at full scale. Beno Saradzic’s “BEYOND: Memoirs in a ” captures just that. Taken from more than two years of footage from Abu Dhabi and Dubai, this film showcases hourly transformations wrought on some of the city’s most famous buildings, such as the Al Bahar Towers and Burj Khalifa.  

City of Imagination: Kowloon Walled City 20 Years Later

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Twenty years ago, one of the world’s most unusual and unexpected pieces of architecture was razed to the ground: ’s Kowloon Walled City, the most densely populated area on earth. Squalid, dark, and labyrinthine, the informal city was not only a hotbed for organized crime, but also a vibrant community of commerce and hope. Now, the Wall Street Journal has released this short , bringing the city back to life and revealing why it holds a special place in world culture today.

VIDEO: I LIKE White

ArchDaily has teamed up with Portugal’s Canal 180 to bring you their series I LIKE. Check out episode 9, I LIKE White, which features BIG’s Danish Pavilion for the 2010 Shanghai Expo, PROJECTiONE‘s EXOtique and dosmasuno arquitectosCarabanchel Housing.

I LIKE is an original series on and spatial intervention, developed in a collaboration between Canal 180 and LIKEarchitects atelier. Diogo Aguiar and Teresa Otto have created a chromatic experiment and spatial exercise—organized by color—that reveals some of the most amazing architectural interventions in the world.

Next week ArchDaily will premier the tenth installment of I LIKE. Stay tuned!

Previous episodes in the I LIKE series:

Episode 1 – I LIKE Black
Episode 2 – I LIKE Pink
Episode 3 – I LIKE Purple
Episode 4 – I LIKE Multicolor
Episode 5 – I LIKE Blue
Episode 6 – I LIKE Yellow
Episode 7 – I LIKE Green
Episode 8 – I LIKE Red

The Berlage Archive: David Chipperfield (2001)

ArchDaily has teamed up with the The Berlage to provide exclusive access to their newly digitized archive of lectures. The Berlage is a postgraduate international institute where some of the world’s most renowned architects, thinkers, designers, photographers and other professionals come to share, exchange and critically reflect upon their ideas. Over the last 23 years, The Berlage has built up an extensive archive of seminal lectures. Thanks to this partnership we can now share them with you. ArchDaily is committed to providing inspiration and knowledge to architects all over the world, so please look forward to monthly publications of these lectures during the coming year.

In this 2001 lecture titled “Tradition and Invention,” David Chipperfield explains why the idea of continuity — as opposed to discontinuity — helps one design buildings. Though modern architecture has the desire to break with the past, Chipperfield embraces tradition and memory instead of modernistic pragmatism. 

Don’t miss the other lectures in The Berlage Archive series

VIDEO: Paris in Motion

In this four-part, stop-motion series, Mayeul Akpovi presents a new perspective on the City of Lights. Filmed with manual camera movements and composed of more than 30,000 photographs, the videos enable a unique, otherwise-unattainable experience of ’ sleepless urban spaces by ceaselessly attenuating the passage of time.

Watch part one (above), and continue after the break for the remaining series…

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TED Talk: How Public Spaces Make Cities Work / Amanda Burden

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, former animal behaviorist turned New York’s chief city planner, has discovered what makes cities desirable: great public spaces. During her time with the Bloomberg administration, Burden oversaw the fruition of the city’s most transformative public projects, including New York’s beloved High Line. In the above, she reveals the many unexpected challenges of planning (and maintaining) parks people love, and why it is so important for cities to have great public spaces.