Arquitectura à Moda do Porto: Episode 8 – The Skylights of Porto

We have teamed up with Building PicturesFilipa Figueira and Tiago Vieira to feature weekly episodes of their video series “,” which highlights ’s most significant buildings over the last two decades.

The series launched in 2013 and is composed of 10 episodes, each focusing on a different theme: light, stairs, balconies, nature, textures, doors, windows, skylights, pavements and structures.

Last week we featured the series’ seventh episode about ’s windows, and now we present Episode 8 – Skylights. Read the producers’ description of the latest episode after the break.

(more…)

Rare Interview with Buckminster Fuller on the Geodesic Life

“I must reorganize the environment of man by which then greater numbers of men can prosper,” says Buckminster Fuller in this rare interview on the Geodesic Life with Studs Terkel (recorded in 1965 and 1970). Animated by Jennifer Yoo and produced by Blank and Blank, this interview has been brought to life as the first of “The Experimenters” mini-series that features rare interviews with Bucky, Jane Goodall, and Richard Feynman focusing on science, technology and innovation.

In Residence: Joseph Dirand

NOWNESS‘ latest In Residence series takes us into the Parisian home French architect Joseph Dirand. Adorned with an eclectic mix of vintage relics backdropped by a simple pallet of raw , the apartment reveals Dirand’s taste for minimalism. “I always want to get inspired by different things and I realize there is no end to learning,” says Dirand.

Arquitectura à Moda do Porto: Episode 7 – Peeking Through the Windows of Porto

ArchDaily has teamed up with Building PicturesFilipa Figueira and Tiago Vieira to feature weekly episodes of their video series “Arquitectura à Moda do Porto,” which highlights Porto’s most significant buildings over the last two decades.

The series launched in 2013 and is composed of 10 episodes, each focusing on a different theme: light, stairs, balconies, nature, textures, doors, windows, skylights, pavements and structures.

Last week we featured the series’ sixth episode about Porto’s doors, and now we present Episode 7 – Windows. Read the producers’ description of the latest episode after the break.

(more…)

Video: Frei Otto Experimenting with Soap Bubbles

YouTube Preview Image

“The computer can only calculate what is already conceptually inside of it; you can only find what you look for in computers. Nevertheless, you can find what you haven’t searched for with free experimentation.” – From A Conversation with Frei Otto, by Juan Maria Songel

For Frei Otto, experimentation with and maquettes was a fundamental part of his work as an architect. In 1961, he began to conduct a series of experiments with soap bubbles (featured in the video above). His experiments centered on suspending soap film and dropping a looped string into it to form a perfect circle. By then trying to pull the string out a minimal surface was created. It was these created surfaces that Otto experimented with.

Through these types of experimentation he was able to build forms and that were previously believed to be impossible. “Now it can be calculated, but for more than 40 years it was impossible to calculate it. I have not waited for it to be calculated in order to build it.”

(more…)

Archiculture Interviews: Joe Brown

YouTube Preview Image

“We know that buildings are destroying the environment as well as building the environment.” In the latest Archiculture extras interview from Arbuckle Industries, architect and CIO of AECOM Joe Brown talks about the changes and challenges he has witnessed in the architecture industry. He discusses the dynamics of being part of a multinational firm and the effects it has on design, as well as the political notions embedded in the field. Additionally, Brown touches on the problems associated with the built environment and how they are inspiring change in the next generation of designers.

Rome: ‘Pilgrimage Site For The World’s Imagination’

Adam Nathaniel Furman‘s tenure as the recipient of the 2014/15  Prize for Architecture at the British School at Rome has come to an end. The project that he has investigated over the past months, entitled The Roman Singularity, sought to explore and celebrate Rome as “the contemporary city par-excellence” – “an urban version of the internet, a place where the analogical-whole history of society, architecture, politics, literature and art coalesce into a space so intense and delimited that they collapse under the enormity of their own mass into a singularity of human endeavour.”

(more…)

Video: Frei Otto’s German Pavilion at Expo 67

YouTube Preview Image

Last night German architect Frei Otto was selected as the 2015 Pritzker Prize Laureate, the second German to win the award and the first to receive the award posthumously. The above shows the impressive construction process of Otto’s German Pavilion at the 1967 International and Universal Exposition in Montreal (although unfortunately without sound).

Covering an area of 8,000 square meters, the pavilion featured a large, steel mesh web suspended over eight steel masts, which were located at irregular intervals and supported by anchored cables located outside of the structure.  A transparent polyester fabric was then placed over the mesh roof, creating a tent.  The whole construction took only six weeks.

(more…)

Architecture Documentaries To Watch In 2015

Microtopia (2013) / Jesper Wachtmeister

Following our top 40 Architecture Docs to Watch in 2014 and our favourite 30 Architecture Docs to Watch in 2013, 2015 is no exception! Our latest round up continues to feature a fantastic range of films and telling the tales of unsung architectural heroes and unheard urban narratives from around the world. This entirely fresh selection looks past the panoply of stars to bring you more of the best architectural  which will provoke, intrigue and beguile.

From a film which explores one man’s dream to build a cathedral (#4) and a simultaneous history of and vision of ’s future (#7), to a tour of the world’s last surviving squatter town in Copenhagen (#14) and A Short History of Abandoned Sets in Morocco (#16), we present – in no particular order – thirty freshly picked documentaries for you to watch in 2015.

(more…)

Genre de Vie: A Film About Cycling’s Impact On Urban Livability

Courtesy of Jorrit Spoelstra

Today we are facing environmental issues more than ever. While architects, urban designers, policymakers and thinkers discuss the future of our , more and more people become aware of their own impact and use of space. Genre de Vie is a documentary film about bicycles, cities and personal awareness. Using the bicycle, Genre de Vie delves into how cycling contributes to the future livability of cities.

Watch the full documentary after the break.

(more…)

Archiculture Interviews: Tom Hanrahan

YouTube Preview Image

“[Architecture] shapes people’s lives, it shapes people’s understanding of cities for generations to come… Architecture as a discipline is extremely powerful.” In the latest of Arbuckle IndustriesArchiculture interviews, architect, professor, and dean of Pratt Institute Tom Hanrahan discusses his views on the convergence of architecture and education. He addresses the uniquely public character of architecture schools in comparison with other fields of study, as well as qualities of both professors and students that foster the best educational environment. Additionally, Hanrahan touches on how the public image of cities, particularly New York City, can influence our perception of them.

Arquitectura à Moda do Porto: Episode 6 – Walking Through the Doors of Porto

We teamed up with Building PicturesFilipa Figueira and Tiago Vieira to feature weekly episodes of their series “,” which highlights Porto’s most significant buildings over the last 20 years.

The series was launched in December 2013 and is comprised of 10 episodes, each focusing on a different theme: light, stairs, balconies, nature, , doors, windows, skylights, pavements and structures.

Last week we presented the series’ fifth episode on Porto’s textures, and now we present Episode 6 – Doors. Read the producers’ description of the video after the break.

(more…)

Arquitectura à Moda do Porto: Episode 5 – the Varied Textures of Porto

We teamed up with Building PicturesFilipa Figueira and Tiago Vieira to feature weekly episodes of their video series “,” which highlights Porto’s most significant buildings over the last 20 years.

The series was launched in December 2013 and is comprised of 10 episodes, each focusing on a different theme: light, stairs, balconies, nature, , , windows, skylights, pavements and structures.

Last week we presented the series’ fourth episode on Porto’s natural environment, and now we present Episode 5 – Textures. Read the producers’ description of the video after the break.

(more…)

Archiculture Interviews: Ted Landsmark

YouTube Preview Image

“…In many of our architecture schools [...] we’re finding that the students themselves are asking for a more socially-conscious and a more environmentally-conscious kind of architecture, a kind of architecture that really serves human needs.” In the latest Arbuckle IndustriesArchiculture interview, former Boston Architectural College President Ted Landsmark discusses his experience in the industry. He delves into the demographic trends that make up the field of architecture today, and the influence these have on the work that is being done. He also touches on the “privileged” ideology associated with architecture, and how the shifting global demands and client preferences are abandoning this mentality.

Video: Architect Rob Quigley on the 35-Year Struggle to Build the San Diego Library

“Big things don’t happen overnight,” says architect Rob Quigley, speaking to Breadtruck Films, “and civic buildings certainly don’t happen overnight.” The words ring true in the context of Quigley’s San Diego New Central Library, which opened in 2013 following a protracted 17 year period of design and construction. After conceiving of the design in 1996, Quigley’s plans for the library were “put on the back burner” when planning authorities chose to halt construction on the project in favor of a new ballpark. Construction eventually recommenced years later, in what has since been described as “absolutely a surreal experience.”

In this Quigley describes the driving force of “creating an architecture that responds honestly and authentically to who we are,” and how the library has come to be a “symbol of []‘s commitment to learning and literacy.” 

(more…)

Video: Football Stadium Arena Borisov / OFIS arhitekti

Recently completed in BelarusOFIS arhitekti‘s Football Stadium Arena Borisov combines modern technology and creative space planning to produce an environment with fine-tuned acoustics, 360 degree views of the field, and lots of public recreational opportunities. The 13,000-seat arena’s stretched textile skin lends a distinctive character within its rugged forest setting and public street at its base where it lifts away from the building’s core. Beyond the stadium, its 3,628 square-meter site hosts public gyms, a bowling area, restaurants, bars, and shops, as well as offices, press boxes, and training facilities. Check out the to get an in-depth look inside the arena and learn more about the stadium, here.

In Residence: Daniel Libeskind

The latest installation of the In Residence series, Polish-born architect Daniel Libeskind welcomes NOWNESS into his Manhattan apartment, just five blocks north of Ground Zero.

“I love it in the evening, because you can see how beautiful New York is; every building is a sculpture,” says the architect. “They’ve got plumbing, so they’re not pure sculpture, but they are really abstract works of lives… In this condensed environment, there is so much richness.”

Marble Quarrying Looks Even More Awesome Than You Imagined

In this video from NOWNESS, an excerpt from Yuri Ancarani’s documentary “Il Capo” (The Chief), the filmmaker captures the mesmerizing business of Marble extraction in the hills of Northwest Italy. The prized delicacy of the Carrara stone’s surface is juxtaposed against the dramatic size and weight of the blocks they are removing, which eventually fall with an earth-shattering thud. Similarly the rugged power of the excavators is in marked contrast to the precise, understated gestures of the chief himself, who directs his workers with a complex series of predetermined hand signals.

“Marble quarries are places so unbelievable and striking, they almost feel like they are big theaters or sets,” explains Yuri Ancarani. “I was so taken by the chief, watching him work. How he can move gigantic marble blocks using enormous excavators, but his own movements are light, precise and determined.”

(more…)