Video: First Look Inside Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partner’s “Cheesegrater”

YouTube Preview Image

In a short film for The Guardian Lead Architect and Partner of Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners, Graham Stirk, tours Robert Booth around the almost-complete Leadenhall Building. The building is referred to as a relative of it’s neighbour, Lloyds of London, which was completed by Richard Rogers‘s practice in 1986. Leadenhall, dubbed the “Cheesegrater” due to its angled façade, is twice the height of Lloyds and is considered to be the physical manifestation of the evolution of Rogers’ architectural and tectonic language. Although less “structurally showy” than its counterpart, the building is still unconventionally bold when it comes to structural expression.

(more…)

Step Inside This Brain-Like Pavilion for an Eerie Architectural Light Show

Have you ever wondered what a thought might look like traveling through your brain? In a recent installation in Moscow‘s Nikola-Lenivets park, media design firm Radugadesign animated the inner workings of the human brain with an innovative video projection. Universal Mind, a sculptural installation by artist Nikolay Polisskyserves as the immobile backdrop for the elaborate project. Over the course of nearly eight minutes, Polissky’s brain-like sculpture explodes into a maelstrom of light and sound, with carefully curated streams of energetic colour interspersed with dark scenes of manufactured glimmering starlight.

The New Media Night Festival orchestrated the installation on July 5th with over five thousand in attendance across the three-day festival. park is home to 28 different public sculptural installations.

Why is it So Expensive to Build in London?

YouTube Preview Image

London is the world’s most expensive city to build in, but the reasons may surprise you. The city is well known for its high cost of living despite being far less crowded than cities such as Tokyo and New York. In fact, commercial real estate in London’s West End costs nearly twice as much as similarly sized spaces on New York’s Madison Avenue.

This video from the Economist reveals how these high costs arise thanks to the city’s historic infrastructure. Vast networks of underground tunnels, unexploded World War II bombs, ancient Roman ruins, and narrow medieval roads all make in the city a highly specialized endeavor. These difficulties, combined with strict historical preservation regulations drive up costs even more. However, architects and developers are not deterred, and are willing to pay high prices for the privilege of building in London. 

Video: The Elevated London That Almost Was

Inspired by an article written by Michael Hebbert in 1993, Chris Bevan Lee’s forty minute documentary explores the elevated post-war infrastructural redevelopment of the City of London, fragments of which still stand across the square mile today. The Pedway: Elevating London examines London planners’ attempt to build an ambitious network of elevated walkways through the city that largely never saw completion. In a carefully produced film those ’pedways’ that remain are photographed and discussed as symbols of a utopia that almost was.

(more…)

The Berlage Archive: Stefano Boeri (2001)

ArchDaily has teamed up with the The Berlage to provide exclusive access to their newly digitized archive of lectures. is a postgraduate international institute where some of the world’s most renowned architects, thinkers, designers, photographers and other professionals come to share, exchange and critically reflect upon their ideas. Over the last 23 years, has built up an extensive archive of seminal lectures. Thanks to this partnership we can now share them with you. ArchDaily is committed to providing inspiration and knowledge to architects all over the world, so please look forward to monthly publications of these lectures during the coming year.

What is Europe’s new role in a globalized, post-terrorist world? In this lecture from 2001, Italian architect Stefano Boeri meditates on the intersection of socialism, urbanism and globalization in a world still reeling from the attacks on September 11th, which had occurred just months prior. ”Multiplicity,” he explains, is about creating an opportunity to discuss the myriad of components affecting the all-encompassing world of architecture. Boeri paints his ideas in broad strokes, punctuating with specific examples of social uprising as catalysts for movements within architecture.

“Europe cannot be read as geographical or geopolitical environment” says Boeri, “it has a history of mobile borders.” In a world turned upside down by a new culture of terrorism, Boeri delves into the traveling museum exhibition as a worldwide vehicle for research, discussion and progress. Referencing his research on urban planning in “Mutations” with Rem Koolhaas, Boeri places architecture on the leading edge of societal progress, as typified in his later project Bosco Verticale in Milan.

Check out the other lectures in The Berlage Archive series

Folklore Meets Design, Architecture and Light Deep in the Canadian Forest

Imagine yourself standing at a glowing threshold between reality and make believe, watching as mythical creatures dash across trees and into other dimensions. Imagine a world where the glimmer of fairies is reflected on a forest floor illuminated by trees of all colours; a world where a sea of stars transforms into an imaginary wolf, standing sentinel over its fairy tale universe. This enchanted world exists, thanks to the creatives at Moment Factory. In their Foresta Lumina video mapping project, they create a narrative installation set in the mysterious backwoods of Quebec, Canada. Find out how they add a little fantasy to ordinary reality after the break.

(more…)

Video: Re-imagining Paris Through Archi’llusion

Have you ever treated a famous city like your very own sketchbook? Claire and Max of Menilmonde did just that. The duo re-envisioned the buildings and monuments of by capturing the lower stories through video and sketching imaginary additions in a project that viscerally challenges pre-conceived attitudes towards iconic structures. Take a walk through the City of Love and experience it anew as a work of art.

(more…)

Video: Autoban Design For Heydar Aliyev International Airport

Our friends at Crane.tv have brought you the designers of a fascinating new addition to Azerbaijan’s booming architectural landscape. Istanbul based design firm Autoban undertook the immense challenge to design the entire interior of Baku, Azerbaijan’s Heydar Aliyev International Airport. Following the commitment that “architecture and interior design should tell the same story,” the firm drew inspiration from the structure and form of the building, one of many that, thanks to such stars as Zaha Hadid’s Heydar Aliyev Center and HOK’s Flame Towers, is putting Baku on the global architectural map. Valuing hospitality and the beauty of experience, designs a terminal that encourages the soaring building to embrace the intimate human scale.

Video: Artist Animates 5 Iconic Modern Homes

Five of history’s most iconic modern houses are re-created as illustrations in this two-minute video created by Matteo Muci. Set to the tune of cleverly timed, light-hearted music, the animation constructs the houses piece-by-piece on playful pastel backgrounds. The five homes featured in the short but sweet video are Le Courbusier’s Villa Savoye, ’s Rietveld Schröder House, Ludwig Mies van der Rohe’s Farnsworth House, Philip Johnson’s Glass House and ’s Fallingwater.

Video: Inside Steven Holl’s Reid Building at Glasgow School of Art

Steven Holl Architects, in collaboration with Spirit of Space, have created two short films of the recently completed Seona Reid Building at Glasgow School of Art. The film series explores the complementary contrast of the new and Charles Rennie Mackintosh’s 1909 building (which recently suffered a devastating fire), where “each work of architecture heightens the integral qualities of the other.”

The first film takes the viewers on a “poetic climb” up and through the building’s social circuit, which “purposefully encourages inter-disciplinary activity, with the hope to inspire positive energy for the future of art.” The second film unpacks the design of the Reid Building in a conversation with design architects Steven Holl and Chris McVoy.

(more…)

Video: Umbrellium At The Barbican

Umbrellium is a team of architects, designers, commercial experts, producers and creative technologists that create and commercialise participatory products and services that empower people to transform their cities. This video is about Assemblance, where Kinetic sensors and lasers allow for a truly interactive light experience.

VIDEO: Marcio Kogan’s Studio SC

Textures and Ants is one of five videos on display by Studio MK27 at the Palazzo Mora as part of the ”Time Space Existence“ exhibition, running parallel to the Venice Biennale.

Produced by Pedro Kok and Gabriel Kogan, the video shows Studio SC, a photography studio based in São Paulo and designed by Marcio Kogan.

(more…)

Drone Captures OMA’S Taipei Performing Arts Center Under Construction

YouTube Preview Image

is underway for OMA’s Taipei’s Performing Arts Center! The project, started back in 2012, has generated a buzz in the architecture community for its peculiar form. Conceived as a number of theaters intersecting as a group of three simple geometries, the Performing Arts Center will provide flexible stage space to host experimental theater and art performances. This video—filmed by a drone—shows some of the preliminary structure that has already been erected. The building is expected to be completed in 2015.

VIDEO: Chicago’s Three Tallest Buildings Simultaneously Struck by Lightning

Lightning doesn’t strike twice in the same place – or so goes the saying. But if you’ve ever watched a skyscraper in a , you probably know that this saying isn’t exactly true. What might be a little more rare is lightning striking three places at once, but thanks to this amazing timelapse video by Craig Shimala we now know that this too is possible, as the lightning rods on Chicago‘s Willis Tower, Trump Tower and John Hancock Center are all hit simultaneously (keep an eye out at the 36-second mark, and see the still image after the break). Perhaps the most amazing thing of all is that this is the second time Shimala has recorded this exact occurrence – you can also see his video from 2010 after the break.

(more…)

Video: Charles Jencks on the 2014 Venice Biennale

YouTube Preview Image

In this extended interview by the Architectural Review, Charles Jencks provides an in-depth description of the 2014 Venice Biennale and critiques his former student Rem Koolhaas’ overall curation and theme: Fundamentals.

Arguing that the previous thirteen Biennales have, “more or less, tried to predict what is going to happen over the next five years,” ”Rem Koolhaas has changed the paradigm:” Rem’s Biennale is about “the past of the present”. Jencks, who describes Koolhaas as ”the Corbusier of our time”, suggests that his Biennale is about analysis rather than total synthesis. He has, however, “shown that research can be creative.”

(more…)

Video: drMM

The latest video from Crane.tv involves the London-based drMM architecture studio. An eclectic mix of architectural know-how puts this practice at the forefront of innovative and sustainable design.

TEDxTalk: The General Theory of Walkabiity/ Jeff Speck

YouTube Preview Image

In this TEDxTalk, the follow up to his popular TED Talk, “The Walkable City,” urban planner Jeff Speck delves more deeply into his “General Theory of Walkability.” The theory maintains there are four ground rules for increasing pedestrian traffic in urban areas: walking must be safe, comfortable, interesting, and – most importantly – there must be a reason to walk in the first place. Counterpointing this with America’s fixation with accommodating the automobile, Speck shows us how beneficial a pedestrian city can be, both functionally and aesthetically.

VIDEO: Daniel Libeskind on Drawing, Architecture’s Forgotten Fundamental

In this video from our friends at Spirit of Space, Daniel Libeskind talks about his installation for the Pavilion at the 2014 Venice Biennale, entitled ‘Sonnets in Babylon’. The installation deals with drawing, an act that Libeskind believes is “the foundational art, and the mystery and the magic of all buildings and cities.” To Libeskind, drawings are akin to religious materials, communicating meaning without the use of a fixed language and each with its own power to shape the way we understand the world around us. At the end he gives a hint as to why he is so attached to drawings: ”I drew for many years before I even built a building. But I based those buildings that I built on the drawings I made… Every drawing is also a tool for the future.”