Four Design Firms’ Takes on Multigenerational Living

Namly House by CHANG Architects, A House for Multi-Generation Living. Image © Albert Lim K.S.

Multigenerational homes are nothing new. But with life expectancy increasing, young people staying longer in their childhood homes, and Baby Boomers aging, children, parents, and grandparents under the same roof might soon become the norm. To explore this possibility, Metropolis Magazine asked four design firms to consider what multigenerational living might look like in the future. Check out each unique take on sharing resources and space by reading the article here.

In Images: The Domino Sugar Factory’s Beautiful Decline

© Paul Raphaelson

Ten years after closing its doors, the Domino Sugar Refinery’s iconic forty-foot tall yellow sign is still legible along the waterfront, even from parts of Manhattan. The refinery, built in 1882, was once the largest in the world, producing over half of the sugar consumed in the United States. Sadly, the historic landmark will soon be demolished, making room for luxury living — and a handful of apartments for affordable housing, at mayor Bill de Blasio’s insistence. As time runs out, a photographer, photography editor, and historian are vying for the opportunity to thoroughly document the site and publish a book entitled Sweet Ruin: Fossils and Stories of the Brooklyn Domino Sugar Refinery.

The photographer, Paul Raphaelson, was recently given a day’s worth of access to the site by its owner, real estate development company Two Trees Management. Raphaelson was able to visit and photograph three of the refinery’s buildings, capturing the sugar-coated interiors of the hauntingly cavernous spaces. He hopes to revisit the site before it’s too late to take more photographs with the guidance of his two collaborators, photography editor Stella Kramer and historian Matthew Postal. For the compelling images and more details about the future publication, keep reading after the break.

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5 Awesome AutoCAD Tricks

Courtesy of CADline

Do you get excited when you discover a game-changing command on ? Don’t worry, us too – which is why we’re recommending five YouTube tutorials selected by Line//Shape//Space. To learn something new (like importing point cloud data or searching for text within your drawings), or just to brush up on your skills, click here.

New Harvard GSD Class Asks: Are Competitions Worth It?

’s 2009 render for the National Library in Astana, Kazakhstan, which was never built. Image Courtesy of -Bjarke Ingels Group

For small firms, design competitions can often feel like a Catch22 - enter and lose precious time and resources (usually for nothing) or avoid them – at the risk of losing out on the “big break.” Now a new class at Harvard’s Graduate School of Design takes on just this quandary, as well as the many other practical, theoretical, and moral implications of architectural competitions for the profession. Learn more at this article at the Harvard Gazette.

The Forgotten Modernist: Knud Lonberg-Holm

(1895-1972), a criminally overlooked but highly influential Modernist architect, photographer, and pioneer of information design. Image Courtesy of Metropolis Magazine

Who is Knud Lonberg-Holm? An overlooked modernist architect, photographer, author, researcher, and teacher praised by the likes of Buckminster Fuller – one of his good friends and biggest advocates. To learn about the architect’s unsung accomplishments and the people determined to preserve his memory, check out Metropolis Magazine‘s article by clicking here.

BIG and Kilo Redesign Gropius’ Tableware Set

Courtesy of BIG

TAC tableware – designed in the 1960s by Walter Gropius and influenced by the Bauhaus style – has been given new life by BIG and the industrial design studio Kilo. The new tableware set features the heritage blue skylines of twelve cities, including Copenhagen, London, and New York. To check out the full set and spot the likes of Big Ben and the Statue of Liberty, head to the manufacturer’s website by clicking here.

The Works of the Late João Filgueiras Lima, Brazilian Icon

JSN Residence ©

Last week one of the greatest icons of Brazilian architecture, , also known as , passed away. Photographer Joana França has shared with us photographs depicting the architect’s extensive repertoire - from his most classic works to some lesser-known gems.

See them all, after the break…

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Cape Town Adopts Re-Blocking Strategy for Informal Settlements

In Kuku Town, dwellings were rearranged to face a communal courtyard – where people can gather for activities and keep an eye on their neighbors and shared facitilies.. Image Courtesy of Future Cape Town

The city of Cape Town has adopted a new strategy for improving informal settlements – , “the reconfiguration and repositioning of shacks in very dense informal settlements in accordance to a -drafted spatial framework.” serves to create communal spaces, make neighborhoods safer, and improve dwelling structures – among many other things. To see how it has been implemented and where, head to Future Cape Town and continue reading here.

AIRBNB Pavilion Coming to the Venice

During this year’s Architecture Biennale in Venice, homes rented through AIRBnB (although not the company itself) will host an independently curated . AIRBnB is a six-year old platform through which home owners can rent out rooms, apartments, and entire houses, allowing “the fortress of the family and the individual” to be infiltrated. The pavilion will take advantage of this “infiltration” and how it reveals “the house, the home and today’s life.” To learn more, follow @airbnbpavilion on instagram and twitter.

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ArchDaily Editors Select 20 Amazing 21st Century Museums

In honor of International Museum Day we’ve collected twenty fascinating museums well worth visiting again. In this round up you’ll find classics – such as Bernard Tschumi Architects New Acropolis Museum and Zaha Hadid Architects‘ MAXXI Museum - as well as lesser-known gems – such as Medieval Museum, the Natural History Museum of Utah by Ennead, and the Muritzeum by Wingårdhs. See all of our editors’ favorites after the break!

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The Atlanta BeltLine: From Student Thesis to Community Mobilizer

A parade passes through the Eastside Trail of the BeltLine, completed in October 2012. Image © Christopher T. Martin

An abandoned twenty-two mile stretch of derelict railroad and industrial sites used to be a thorn in the Atlanta community’s side. But with one student’s thesis proposal to redevelop these areas into a sustainable network connecting 45 mixed-use neighborhoods, public concern has since turned into excitement. To learn more about the ambitious project, head over to The Atlantic  here.

What Makes a City a City?

The presence of a cathedral meant St David’s in Pembrokeshire had city status with a population of around 2,000. Image Courtesy of Alamy

You probably use the word ‘city’ on a daily basis, but if put on the spot – could you give it a concise definition? Under the rule of Henry VIII, the title of city was given to virtually any settlement in the United Kingdom with a diocesan cathedral. Obviously, times have changed. For Robert Bevan’s thoughts on the title’s past and present meaning, read his article on The Guardian here.

Lost Opportunity? Norman Foster’s New York Public Library Renovation

Not gonna happen. Image Courtesy of dbox/Foster + Partners

As we mentioned a few days ago, Norman Foster’s controversial New York Public Library renovation was axed before the most current proposal was even revealed. While book worms rejoice over the victory, others are disappointed about the lost opportunity. To read about what could have been, head on over to New York Magazine and read Justin Davidson’s thoughts here.

Win a Free Full Pass to the 2014 AIA National Convention from reThink Wood

Dewitt-Chestnut Apartments. Image © Hedrich Blessing via SOM

UPDATE: Submissions are now closed. We will contact the winner in the week.

Next month, the AIA National Convention is coming to Chicago – bringing together the best and brightest building professionals to network, and learn about growing trends in the architecture industry. If you haven’t booked your ticket already, here is a chance to attend the event free of charge!

reThink Wood is offering a full pre-paid pass to the National Convention ($945 value) to one lucky ArchDaily reader. The winner will also be able to meet with architects on site that are passionate about innovative design with wood in mid-rise, and even high-rise projects.

To win, just answer the following question in the comments section before May 21 12:00PM EST: What architect(s) are doing the most interesting work with wood today?

More on reThink Wood at the AIA, after the break. 

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Toomath’s Legacy: Defining Modern New Zealand Architecture

Toomath House, view of the Oriental Bay. Image Courtesy of Simon Devitt

“What makes us New Zealanders different from, say, Australians?” , the late modernist architect, asked himself this question at the onset of his career. In this article published by the Australian Design Review, Jack Davies takes a look at Toomath’s work and how he helped define architecture. To keep reading, click here.

“Every Building is a Social Critique” – Polshek Describes His Oeuvre in Latest Book

Polshek’s memorable design for the Rose Center for Earth and Space (2000) at the American Museum of Natural History in New York. Image Courtesy of Timothy Hursley

While architects don’t always see the connection between politics, social constructs, and architecture, considers the three indivisible. In an interview on Metropolis Magazine about his newly released book Build, Memory, he describes how this belief launched his career 65 years ago. To learn more about Polshek’s approach to architecture and the publication, click here.

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Europe Day 2014: A Roundup of EU Architecture

© Georges Fessy

Today is Europe day in the EU, and to celebrate we’re rounding up some of the best Europe-inspired architecture. First, two buildings designed for European institutions, the Court of Justice of the European Communities by Dominique Perrault and the Council of Europe by Art & Build Architect. Next, we’ve got a building which celebrates the achievements of Europeans, the Cultural Centre of European Space Technologies. Finally, two buildings which promote the very notion of Europe: the EU Pavilion by Senat Haliti, a message of hope for the 72% of Kosovans who wish to join the EU; and Le Monolithe by MVRDV, which has the first article of the European Constitution imprinted on the facade – expounding a belief in “a society in which pluralism, non-discrimination, tolerance, justice, solidarity, and equality between women and men prevail.”

Jacobs and Moses’ Famous Feud to Be Dramatized in Opera

Courtesy of Fast Co-Design

Yes, you read right – the 1960s battle between Jane Jacobs and Robert Moses will be the central story line for a new opera. Although the premiere is a long way off, its creators promise to bring New York City and the drama to life through song and an elaborate, animated, three-dimensional set. To find out more about the developing project, head on over to Fast Co-Design.