Ashoka: 20 challenges for 20 entrepreneurs

Ashoka is the world’s largest community of social entrepreneurs, and has supported thousands of groundbreaking social innovators over the last 30 years (read more at McKinsey).

Currently, is looking for outstanding entrepreneurs that can improve our world by focusing on 20 challenges, some of which are very related to our profession:

Housing

  • You want to meet the huge need for affordable, high quality homes – 25 million in India alone – by leveraging both business and social entrepreneurs.
  • You are passionate about low income communities gaining access to market-based affordable housing and a dignified life.
  • You want to create a complete ecosystem where housing is not just about four walls and a roof but about a place called home – where family, community life, business and sustainability originate.

Design

  • You see the huge potential of design to shape a better world.
  • You will lead a global network of designers and creatives who will transform the development of products, services, processes, and strategies for the good of society.
  • With a designer’s toolkit, you will work at the intersection of social entrepreneurship and science, technology, sociology, philosophy, and engineering.
You can check the rest of the challenges to see if you have what it takes and if it they fit with your passion, and if you think that you have the potential apply to become part of a global change.

Thessaloniki Water Transport Piers Proposal / Giannikis SHOP

From the water towards the Pier

Giannikis SHOP won the honorary mention in the national architecture design competition for the Water Transport Piers in . Four Piers (Eleutheria Square, Megaro, Aretsou, Perea) are designed so that each Pier is composed of three elements: the floor, the pavilions and the inflated pneumatic structure. The main goals for this competition proposal were functionality, economy and innovation. More images and project description after the break. (more…)

Tiger & Turtle – Magic Mountain / Heike Mutter + Ulrich Genth

© Thomas Mayer

Authors: Heike Mutter + Ulrich Genth
Location: Duisburg,
Project Year: 2011
Photographs: Thomas Mayer

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Data Thanatology | Call For Submissions

Floppy Disk by 92wardsenatorfe

If you were asked to store your most valuable data… What kind information would you keep in 130Kb? Your usernames and passwords, your delicious tabs, a PDF with all your tweets, a map as a biography? Do you think this data would be valuable if mapping the genomic code of knowledge at this moment? It would be useful for anyone but you?

With this challenging question we start a publishing project in the intersection of technology and seed banking. Learn more about it after the break. (more…)

Artificial Topography / Ryumei Fujiki

Masahiro Hoshida

Architects: Ryumei Fujiki
Location: , Japan
Client: Kobe Biennial Committee
Project Team: Fujiki Studio, KOU::ARC, Kensuke Kawamura, Yoshiki Tachi, Shun Simoya, Kohaku Furihata, Yuki Sakurada, Toshihiko Hatori, Yoshito Fukaya, Yuji Uemura, Yuki Ishigami
Colaboration: Yukiko Sato (F.A.D.S)
Project Year: 2011
Photographs: Courtesy of Ryumei Fujiki, Masahiro Hoshida

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ACUO / Edit! architects

© Michal Seba

Architects: Vitezslav Danda
Location: Prague, Czech Republic
Concept: Michal Seba
Coop­er­a­tion: Ivan Boros, Matous Godik, Pedro Sousa San­tos
Project Year: 2011
Photographs: Michal Seba

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Horse Stable / Duval + Vives Arquitectos

© Jaime Larrain Boetsch / Estudio RGB

Architects: Duval+Vives Arquitectos / Antonio Duval, Pablo Vives
Location: San Francisco de Mostazal, VI Región,
Project Year: 2010
Project Area: 330 sqm
Photographs: Jaime Larrain Boetsch / Estudio RGB

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BOFFO Building Fashion

A kickstarter campaign to raise funds ensuring the continuation of the BOFFO Building Fashion
venture is underway.
celebrates cutting edge design through a series of temporary retail installations showcasing the work of an architect paired with a fashion designer. Each of five projects receives a $20,000 stipend for all construction, three of which have been completed already with the two remaining projects waiting for funding. All three of these projects can be seen here on ArchDaily, Patrik Ervell + Graham Hudson, Irene Neuwirth + Marc Fornes / TheVeryMany, and Nicola Formichetti + Gage/Clemenceau Architects

A Day in the Life


of an Architectural Intern/Zombie

The alarm clock blared and I blindly reached out to silence the offending noise. I groaned under the covers. Yet another day at the office awaited me… handrail details, toilet partitions, perhaps glazing details. This wasn’t what they told me it would be like in architecture school. I sat up in bed, blinking in the morning sun. The cat was motionless, contentedly sleeping away, undisturbed by my dulled movements.

Dragging myself to the bathroom, I studied my image in the mirror. Bloodshot eyes, grey complexion, bloodied gums. Darn it, it keeps getting worse everyday. I leaned in closer to the mirror only to bump my forehead painfully against the mirror. “Ow,” I groaned and then gazed at the bloody patch of scalp and hair that clung to the surface of the glass. Sighing with disgust and disappointment, I reached for a few sheets of bleach wipes and wiped the mess from the mirror away.

{ More after the break }

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Review: Common Ground in a Liquid City by Matt Hern

© AK Press

Common Ground in a Liquid City: Essays in Defense of an Urban Future by Matt Hern is a collection of ten essays about the future of city-living – or living in general – with very specific examples derived from his city of residence, Vancouver, and its relationship to the numerous cities he has visited.  Hern addresses the successes and pitfalls of Vancouver, a relatively young city, through the critical lens of ten cities each of which is the point of departure for the essay.

Each city gives Hern insight into the structure of cities in the future with references to how Vancouver is dealing with its own development: its history, its urban identity, its division of public spaces, the privatization of the natural environment, its density and the activities that it wishes to foster for its inhabitants.

Come back after the break for more on this collection of essays. (more…)

KERB 19 / Paradigms of Nature: Postnatural Futures

“So no, I don’t accept that the future is over-sold : it’s productised an as a result it’s over constrained by our current ways of thinking and immediate practices …”

- Rachel Armstrong, letter to ARUP

Have you ever wondered how a single cell can finally transform in a complex organism? And how the survival of this organism depends on the key relations set with its species and the environment. The same questions could be applied when talking about our cities. If we see humankind as the top of evolution, the obvious consequence is to see nature as a resource to achieve all of our goals. The adoption of “Sustainable Development” concept is just another way to name the same behaviour adding a green make-up.

But what if we perceive humankind and its manifestations as part of nature? In this case, natural and technological systems should coexist, and their survival depends on reaching an equilibrium in their exchanges of matter and energy. Some forward thinkers have been spreading this message. Now we can found compiled some of them in the new issue of KERB magazine: Paradigms of Nature. Post Natural Futures. (more…)

Weightless Pull / CO

Courtesy of

Weightless Pull designed by CO was part of Public Summer 2011 at Industry City. The installation temporarily transformed a once narrow and empty passageway into a lively vertical and depending on the wind horizontal sculptural environment.

Constructed of plastic wrap and nylon rope (there were over 600 different knots), CO’s design focused on geometry fields and linear systems, mechanics simple intuitive systems that are natural to the chosen materials and geometry, and materials that are repeatable, reusable, and economically sustainable.

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Tokyo/LA Houses Exhibition Charity Auction

© Taiyo Watanabe ()

As part of Little Tokyo Design Week, a recently successful event hosted by Los Angeles, offices deegan day design and of Japan curated an exhibition of 40 houses from Japan and California. The goal was to highlight 20 Japanese and 20 Californian architectural practices that explore new efficiencies of scale, construction and reduced ecological impact, posing innovative possibilities for the future of small-scale residential design. They had many exciting architects participate in this exhibition, such as, Neil Denari, Greg Lynn, Wes Jones, Sou Fujimoto, Makoto Tanijiri, Mt Fuji Architects just to name a few.

As part of their exhibition, most architects also donated a model to auction benefiting the recent disasters in Japan. Although their exhibition only lasted for four short days and they were able to raise over $3,000, they are also starting another auction for the remaining models on eBay. They are currently coordinating with the US-Japan Council in setting up an eBay account that will directly benefit the Japan Platform. The auction is tentatively scheduled for October 17th.

Happy Birthday Le Corbusier!

Courtesy of Wikimedia Commons

Today marks the Swiss-born French architect ’s birthday. Noted as one of the pioneers of modern architecture, ’s architecture career spanned some five decades.  Born in 1887, which would make him 124 today, Charles-Édouard Jeanneret adopted the pseudonym in the 1920s. Known for both his architecture and furniture design you can visit the Galerie Anton Meier where some of Le Corbusier & Pierre Jeanneret furniture is currently on a special exhibit.   More of ArchDaily’s coverage on Le Corbusier, books, buildings, and articles can be found here.

polypod / Bradley Edwards

© Bradley Edwards

Architect: Bradley Edwards, Architect AIA
Location: Fayetteville, , USA
Design/Build Team: David McElyea and Bradley Edwards
Owner: Dr. Mark Thomas
Contractor: David McElyea
Project Area: 160 sqf
Project Year: 2010
Photographs: Bradley Edwards

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Update: CLOG / BIG

Recently, we shared the news of CLOG’s first issue which will focus on Bjarke Ingels Group projects.  The publication seeks to break the fast pace at which architectural projects are thrown upon the public to allow for a pointed discussion and examination on a specific topic. As the editors explain, “ slows things down.”  BIG seems like the perfect firm to examine for this inaugural issue, as the Danish practice has grown so quickly offering architecture lovers a continuous stream of ideas, approaches to form, and flashy visuals – as the editors of CLOG note, “ [is]  a firm that keeps pace with the flow of online imagery, but which has largely been left unexamined.”  On October 7th, CLOG’s launch event at the Storefront for Art and Architecture will become an open forum of sorts as a “Collective Interrogation” will allow guests to ask Bjarke Ingels 10 previously selected questions.

Do you have a question for Ingels and his firm?   Well, here’s your chance to have it answered!  Email your thoughts to interrogation@storefrontnews.org and check out the Storefront for Art and Architecture for more info.

Fashion and Architecture: Le Corbusier inspired Designs

Highlighting fashion one more time this week (take a look at An Architect’s Dress Code) we wanted to share with you this inspired design. Taking a nod from one of architecture’s greats the Corneliani man for Fall/Winter 2011 is an interpretation of the Swiss architect and designer Le Corbusier’s timeless elegance and the ‘talking jacket’. Setting a scene reminiscent of a 1940s movie set the Italian brand’s new collection is described as ‘a suit with peak lapels, a soft, enveloping, deconstructed overcoat, thick glasses and a bow tie symbolise with an eccentric touch a sophisticated and relaxed chic.’

YouTube Preview Image

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CLOG:BIG

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So, you know about Bjarke Ingles’ Yes is More…but how about CLOG? The inaugural issue of the publication will focus on BIG projects offering different critiques and contributions from over 40 writers, as well as responses from Bjarke Ingles.  The work is a reaction to this fact-paced ago of online press, blogs, tweets, etc. where the public is introduced to alarming amounts of work is such a short period of time.  “CLOG slows things down. Each issue explores, from multiple viewpoints and through a variety of means, a single subject particularly relevant to architecture now. Succinctly, on paper, away from the distractions and imperatives of the screen. “   Bringing together contributors from backgrounds including art, architecture, criticism, journalism, parkour, engineering, comics, photography, philosophy, CLOG:BIG presents the first holistic, critical examination of Bjarke  Ingels and his firm.   And, on October 7, the diagloue will continue at the Storefront for Art and Architecture with Bjarke Ingles and CLOG.  Check out the 100+ page book here.