Steven Holl’s Maggie’s Centre Gains Planning Permission

Courtesy of

Steven Holl‘s designs for a Maggie’s Centre at St Bart’s Hospital in London have finally been approved, after a tense debate among the City of Planning Committee which culminated in a vote of 11 to 10 in favour of the design. The approval puts an end to a year of controversy, after Holl’s first attempt failed to gain planning (the first time a Maggie’s Centre has ever been declined permission) and a protest group commissioned a rival scheme by Hopkins Architects which gained planning permission in April.

More on the decision after the break

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Photos of Álvaro Siza’s Fundação Iberê Camargo, by Fernando Guerra

© Fernando Guerra | FG+SG

 “A painter is a magician that immobilizes time.”  - Iberê Camargo

The Fundação Iberê Camargo, which received a Golden Lion at the 2002 Venice Biennale of , is Portuguese architect Álvaro Siza’s first project in Brazil. It serves as an architectural exemplar not only for the city of Porto Alegre, but also for the entire country of Brazil. Defined by Siza as “quasi-arquitecture” — with careful explorations of light, texture, movement and space–the building cultivates a direct relationship between the viewer and the artwork, and, in turn, allows visitors to richly come into contact with Iberê’s (one of the great names of twentieth-century Brazilian art) work.

“Architects don’t invent anything, they just transform reality.” - Álvaro Siza

The first in Brazil to use white concrete–seen around the entire exterior– the building does not use any bricks. The visitor is guided through a trajectory of descent throughout the building via ramps in the nine exhibition halls. The monolith is supported by massive slabs, pillars and beams. No detail escaped the hands of the architect; the furniture and signage were also designed by Siza.

Last week, the project was nominated as one of seven finalists in the Mies Crown Hall Americas Prize (MCHAP). Now in its first edition, and with a distinguished jury (, Sarah Whiting, Wiel Arets, Dominique Perrault, e Kenneth Frampton), the MCHAP recognizes exceptional architecture built in the first 13 years of the 21st century.

With this news, we are presenting an extensive set of photos of this important project, realized and generously shared by one of the world’s most important architecture photographers: Fernando Guerra of FG+SG - Últimas reportagens.

Story written by Joanna Helm for ArchDaily Brasil. Translated by Becky Quintal.

Scroll to see Guerra’s beautiful images of the Fundação Iberê Camargo:

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Thousands of Inhabitants May Be Relocated As Chinese Bankers Eye Venezuela’s Torre David

© Vía ‘The Atlantic’

Torre de David (the Tower of David) - the world’s tallest slum and the subject of Urban-Think TankJustin McGuirk, and Iwan Baan‘s Golden Lion-winning Pavilion at the Venice Biennale 2012 - is once again making headlines. Venezuelan newspaper TalCual reports that the Venezuelan government is in negotiations with Chinese banks interested in purchasing the building.

Tower of David is an unfinished financial skyscraper in downtown . Construction began on the tower in 1990, but the death of the principal investor in 1993 and the subsequent banking crisis that hit the country in 1994 froze construction; by the end of the year, the tower was in the hands of the state. Nevertheless, in 2007 two thousand homeless citizens took over and inhabited the skyscraper, making it the tallest vertical slum in the world.

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Re-Thinking the Future 2014 Competition Awards BIG, UN Studio, HOK, and More

Honorable Mention, Public Building Built: Cineteca Nacional S. XXI / Rojkind Arquitectos. Image © Rojkind Arquitectos, photo by Paul Rivera

The winners of Re-Thinking the Future’s 2014 design competition – a competition that asked architects, designers, planners, and students from all over the world to submit “radical solutions for the present day problems” of climate change – have been announced. Requesting both built and conceptual works, the jury of 20 architects from firms such as SOM, AEDAS, and Perkins+Will evaluated the projects across a range of categories, from mixed-use and residential buildings to urban and landscape design.

See all the winners, including proposals from BIG, UN Studio, and HOK, after the break.

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Last Chance to Apply for Free Study at the Strelka Institute

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With applications closing on the 26th of July, those wishing to apply to the prestigious Strelka Institute in Moscow need to act fast. The Strelka Institute is a non-governmental research institute with a particular focus on the City, using multidisciplinary techniques from fields as varied as sociology, economics, , political and cultural studies. Since 2012, Strelka has been among DOMUS Magazine’s top 100 European Schools of Design and Architecture.

Successful applicants will study at the Strelka institute for free, with each student receiving a monthly scholarship to focus on their studies.

More after the break

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C.F. Møller Chosen to Design Antwerp Residential Tower

C.F. Møller’s residential and mix-use tower design in , Belgium.

With the aim of creating a “vertical social community,” C.F Møller Architects and Brut won a competition to design a residential tower in Antwerp, Belgium. The 15,000 square meter building, which stretches 24 stories high, includes 116 homes, shops, offices and collective spaces.

Apartments range from smaller suites for students to larger family units, and each group of similar apartments opens towards balcony spaces, creating “vertical mini-communities.” Through balconies, glass winter gardens and roof terraces, an additional 5,000 square meters of space are added. The architects describe the tower as incorporating an “inside-out perspective, where the social qualities of the building are a dominant driver for the design.”

More on the design from the architects after the break.

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RIBA Announces 2014 Stirling Prize Shortlist

The RIBA has announced the six projects that will compete for the 2014 Stirling Prize, the award for the building that has made the greatest contribution to British in the past year. The six nominees will now be judged head to head for British ’s highest honour, based on “their design excellence and their significance in the evolution of and the built environment,” with a winner announced on October 16th. See the full shortlist after the break.

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Shortlisted Designs Revealed for Goldsmiths College Art Gallery

© Harry Gugger Studios courtesy of Goldsmiths College

The shortlisted projects in the competition to design a new art gallery for Goldsmiths College at the University of London have been revealed. The project will see a new 400 square metre gallery created in the back of what was formerly a Victorian bath-house, and is now the college’s Grade-II listed art studios. Six shortlisted practices were given six weeks to design a gallery which works with the existing industrial structures – including the building’s old water tanks.

The designs will now be judged by Goldsmiths’ competition jury, a panel which includes David Chipperfield and sculptor Antony Gormley.

Read on after the break for details of all six proposals

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Richard Rogers: “Forget About Greenfield Sites, Build In The Cities”

as it could be” / Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners. Image © RSHP

In an article for The Guardian Richard Rogers questions why, with space still left in urban areas, we should build in the countryside? Lord Rogers, no stranger to political activism, chaired the ’s Urban Task Force in the 1990s, culminating in his report Towards an Urban Renaissance. Now, over fifteen years later, his plea for denser, better designed urban environments has been rekindled as he argues that: “We can’t go on like this. The housing shortage threatens both the economy and our quality of life.” Laying out a clear argument reinforced by his forty years of experience as an architect, you can read his article in full here.

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Olson Kundig Designs Rooftop Play Space in South Korea

©

In collaboration with client Shinsegae, Olson Kundig Architects has designed a 20,000 square foot roof garden in Uijeongbu, South Korea.  Sitting atop the ninth floor of a twelve story department store, the park acts as a playground for children and a cultural center for the community.  The project follows a rising trend: placing green spaces on top of buildings in urban areas to create safe and secluded public places.  This particular garden uses entirely native species and incorporates sculptures by the artist Do-Ho Suh.

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Solar Decathlon Europe Announces Winners of its 2014 Contest

Rhome for Dencity / Rhome (Rome, Italy). Image © Solar Decathlon Europe / jflakes.com

On Saturday night, the awards were announced in the 2014 Solar Decathlon Europe, which is currently ongoing in the grounds of the Versailles Palace in France. The competition challenges university teams to build and run a full scale solar powered house, with awards being judged on a range of requirements including factors, and comfort, with a different jury of three experts judging each requirement.

The overall winner, based on a combination of all the factors, was “Rhome for Dencity”, by the team from Roma Tre University, with a proposal that seeks to ”re-densify and re-qualify the boundaries of Rome” by applying principles of density and sustainability to this area where ”housing, country, archaeology and illegal buildings are interwoven.”

Read on after the break for images of all the winners

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Steven Holl Named 2014 Praemium Imperiale Laureate

© Mark Heithoff

The Japan Art Association (JAA) has named American architect Steven Holl as the 2014 Praemium Imperiale Laureate for . Holl will be honored at a ceremony in Tokyo on October 15th. The jury’s citation states that Holl’s ”works are internationally highly regarded, primarily as a result of his philosophy regarding the unification of the “experience” of space, as depicted by color and light, with the history and culture of each site of construction.”

Since its inauguration in 1989, the annual global arts award has recognised “outstanding contributions to the development, promotion and progress of the arts” in the fields of architecture, painting, sculpture, music and theater/film. Only a small handful of architects have received this award, including James Stirling, Tadao Ando, Alvaro Siza, Richard Rogers, Jean Nouvel, Toyo Ito, Zaha Hadid, Peter Zumthor, David Chipperfield, and Jacques Herzog and Pierre de Meuron.

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This Temporary Treetop Hotel Lets You Sleep “With the Birds”

Chinese architecture firm Penda, known for their ecologically sensitive designs, has redesigned the tent in a bold new way for the AIM “Legend Of The Tent” Competition. Their proposal, ”One With The Birds,” is a flexible and structure that integrates sleeping pods into the forest canopy. Inspired by Native American Tipis, which are moveable and reusable, the structure, made from sticks latched together with rope, leaves no impact on the site nor causes any harm to the itself. 

A mock-up of the project will soon be installed as a temporary hotel. According to the architects, “after the temporary hotel is deconstructed, the materials can be reused as scaffolding on a construction site or reused as another temporary hotel on a different location.”

Learn more about this remarkable structure, after the break.

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Does Heritage Have The Power To Change Lives?

Recently Listed: The Spectrum Building / Foster + Partners.. Image © Richard Davies, Courtesy Foster + Partners

In a recent article for The Telegraph Jonathan Ruffer, a hedge fund manager turned campaigner for architectural heritage, discusses the significance of historic buildings in a time when they are “increasingly having to justify itself in the cold light of cost cuts.” The notion of architectural “” covers not only castles and stately homes but increasingly post-war and early contemporary structures. Speaking from a financier’s point of view, Ruffler examines the “gulf” between public and private funding for restorative architectural schemes alongside the difficulty of mobilising large bodies to activate change. Arguing that “heritage has the power to change lives,” the need for people to engage with their built heritage is more important than ever. Read the article in full here.

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ARCHIZOOM: Close-Ups of Architectural Favorites

© Federico Babina

Federico Babina is back with his latest illustration! This time, he explores 23 works of through the lens of one interesting or intense detail that speaks to the character of the work as a whole. Seeing these as movie posters, which use visual imagery to suggest, insinuate, and convey “the essence” of the film, each illustration reflects the work and the architect’s aesthetic overall. See all 23 after the break! 

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MOMA Announces Barry Bergdoll’s Successor for Chief Curator of Architecture & Design

Martino Stierli, The Philip Johnson Chief Curator of Architecture and Design, . Image Courtesy of

Martino Stierli, a Swiss architecture and art history professor interested in ”how architecture is represented in the media and intersects with art,” has been named Barry Bergdoll’s successor as the chief curator of architecture and design at the Museum of Modern Art (MoMA).

In a Press Release, Stierli comments upon his appointment: ”Since its inception, MoMA has presented groundbreaking exhibitions that promote and critically reflect upon modern and contemporary architecture. By continually expanding its comprehensive collection, the Department of Architecture and Design has been pivotal to the preservation of modernism for the future, and to making that accessible to scholars and the broader public alike. I am excited to continue this tradition at MoMA and look forward to working with the Museum’s extraordinary team to contribute to shaping the current discourse on architecture and the city—locally, nationally, and globally.”

He will begin his new role in March 2015. Learn more about Stierli, and how his appointment will influence the MoMA’s exhibitions, at The New York Times’ Arts Beat Blog.

Rem Koolhaas’ “Elements”: Uncovering Architecture’s Origins, Assuring Its Future

Elements of . Image © Nico Saieh

ArchDaily has been asking architects ”What is Architecture?” for over 6 years. It’s a question that few interviewees answer without hesitation or bristling. But after asking over 200 architects, we’ve noticed a pattern: even though many people start very similarly, the answers soon diverge in a way that demonstrates the promise of the profession. And no matter how architecture is defined, the strong majority of architects hold an underlying belief in its ability to influence.

When the ArchDaily team visited the Venice Biennale and entered the Central Pavilion of the Giardini, home to the Elements exhibition, we saw it as a dynamic, immersive, exhaustive response to the question “What is Architecture?” Visitors to the Biennale are introduced to architecture through its elements–the pieces, parts and fundamentals that comprise built structures around the globe.

When Koolhaas chose to focus on Elements, he produced a text (in both book and exhibition format) that gives us the tools to understand what architecture is and how is it has evolved (or stagnated). Even though he didn’t invite people to show projects in the traditional sense, the AD editors saw a hopeful undertone to Elements — it is a resource that can be revisited over and over again, one that will arm the current and future designers of our built world with the knowledge they’ll need to address the issues they have yet to even confront.

After the break, see images of the exhibition and read Koolhaas’ curatorial statement. 

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Want to Land a Job at One of the Top 50 Architecture Firms? Here Are the Skills You Need to Have…

Cannon Design Regional Offices (Cannon Design was one of Architectural Record’s Top 50 Firms in 2013). Image Courtesy of Architectural Imageworks, LLC

This article was originally published on Black Spectacles.

Ever wonder what software skills and licensure/accreditation are required to get a job at the top 50 Architecture firms in the world? Our study has compiled it all…

We surveyed 928 job postings at the top 50 architecture firms, based on Architectural Record’s July 2013 Top 300 Architecture Firms study, and compiled the software requirements and the licensure/accreditation requirements listed for each job.   We then sorted them by average, and then by the experience level required, from 0-3, 4-10 and 11-20+.

The results are in the below:

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