AD On The Streets: The Highline, New York


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This week AD On The Streets takes you deeper into the project, thanks to a new set of destinations announced by Google a couple of days ago, which includes some of the world’s greatest urban parks.

By using trikes, Google has been able to capture one of the most acclaimed urban projects of the last years: The Highline park in New York, by James Corner Field Operations with Diller Scofidio + Renfro.

This project has been the igniter of a larger scale urban renovation in Manhattan, benefiting not only the neighbors, and local store owners, but also the real state sector and tourism. It’s like the Guggenheim Bilbao effect, now cities wants their own “highlines”.

Part Two of The Highline was opened this summer, and Part Three has just been announced (more on that on another post in a few).

AD on The Streets: M2 Building by Kengo Kuma


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This week AD On The Streets takes you to the architecturally dense city of Tokyo, Japan to visit M2, the first major commission of japanese renowned architect Kengo Kuma.

The 4,482.15sqm building was completed in 1991, and it was designed as Matsuda’s (Mazda) car salesroom. It now operates as a funeral hall. More images available on Flickr. Post modernism to the max.

© Kengo Kuma Architects

AD on the Streets: Basel


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Google Street View is an amazing technology that allows us to navigate our built environment. Google has been using cars, tricycles and even snow bikes, loaded with cameras and a GPS system to map the world from a pedestrian perspective.

Every week we are going to take you into an interesting architectural location using Google Street View, to expand the way we show you architecture. Please note that you can drag and walk around the buildings to see them fron different angles.

In this first post we are taking you to an interesting housing project I stumbled upon while walking in Basel, Switzerland. I don’t know who the architect is, but I really liked the way the balconies are arranged in that random facade.

Feel free to leave your comments, feedback or suggested locations in the comments section below.