Vanessa Quirk

Vanessa Quirk, the manager of editorial content at ArchDaily, is a writer who hails from New York. She studied English and Music at the George Washington University and Oxford University. When she's not thinking about the latest in Architecture and Urban Planning, she's either cooking or singing - often simultaneously. LinkedIn / @vmquirk

The Latest Illustration from Federico Babina: ARCHIPORTRAIT

Toyo Ito. Image Courtesy of Federico Babina

Federico Babina, the illustrator behind the extremely popular ARCHIST and ARCHICINE, has just released his latest project: ARCHIPORTRAIT, “an artistic representation of 33 architects, in which the faces and the expressions are made of their architecture.” As Babina says, “The intent is to display the likeness, personality, and even the mood of the protagonist through his aesthetic.”

See all the portraits – from Corbu to Foster to Gehry and more – after the break.

SAP Releases Rare Images of Architecture ‘Selfies’

& Philip Johnson in front of a model of the Seagram Building in 1955. Image Courtesy of Society of Architecture Photography (SAP)

In response to the recent popularity of “selfies” in social media, The Society of Architecture Photography (SAP) has racked their archives to release a few rare images of what the society is calling “architecture selfies” – images taken by architects in front of their works. SAP’s Director, Chantelle Archambault, told us: “We weren’t sure if we would find any at all, but we were pleasantly surprised to find seven – even one of Le Corbusier at Chandigarh in 1961. I suppose it’s only natural – architects consider travel an integral part of their creative process, and a pilgrimage to a built work is one of the most rewarding experiences an architect can claim.”

See all the newly released “architecture selfies” – including photographs of Mies van der Rohe, Louis Kahn, and more – after the break…

Happy Birthday Mies Van der Rohe!

A happy birthday goes out to Ludwig Mies van der Rohe (1886-1969), who would have turned 128 years old today. Mies, who studied under influential figures such as Walter Gropius and Le Corbusier, helped to develop the most enduring architectural style of the 20th Century: modernism.

Among his most famous accomplishments are his seminal Barcelona Pavilion; his work as the head of The Bauhaus school; and, after the Nazi ascension in Germany forced him to emigrate, his leadership at the Illinois Institute of Technology. During his 20 years at IIT, Mies developed what became known as ‘the second Chicago school of architecture’, a style of simplified, rectilinear high-rise buildings exemplified by projects such as 860-880 Lakeshore Drive and the Seagram Building. Mies’s minimalist style proved very popular; his famous aphorism ‘less is more’ is still widely used, even by those who are unaware of its origins. All of this makes him one of the most influential architects of the modernist movement and the 20th century.

logo, 860-880 Lake Shore Drive ©

To celebrate him we have changed our logo to a Mies doodle (above) and have rounded up our great Mies coverage of the past. See the extensive list after the break!

OMA Tops BIG, Büro Ole Scheeren to Design Axel Springer Campus in Berlin

’s winning proposal for the Axel Springer Campus in Berlin. Image Courtesy of Axel Springer SE

After deliberating over the stellar proposals of three renowned firmsBIG, Büro Ole Scheeren, and OMA, Berlin-based media company AXEL SPRINGER SE has just announced that Rem Koolhaas’ design is the winning proposal for their new office building.

The task of the competition was to create additional space for the media company, particularly its digital offers, and thus design a workplace fit for the future of online media. Koolhaas’ design, which features a large 30-meter high atrium or “open valley” with interconnected terraces and public workspaces for both individual, collaborative, and mobile work, won favor with the jury for its forward-thinking concept. As Dr. Mathias Döpfner, Chief Executive Officer of Axel Springer SE, commented: “[Koolhaas] presented the conceptually and esthetically most radical model. The fundamental innovation of working environments will support the cultural transformation towards a digital publishing house.”

For his part, Koolhaas had this to say: “It is a wonderful occasion to build in Berlin again, on this historical site of all places, for a client who has mobilized architecture to help perform a radical change…a workplace in all its dimensions.”

See more of OMA’s winning proposal, after the break…

From #Baffled to #BanstheMan! Twitterverse Reacts to Shigeru Ban’s Pritzker Win

We culled the Twitterverse looking for reactions to ’s Prizker win – from readers and critics alike. While the responses were generally positive, some were less so.

See our favorite responses – from #baffled to #goodenough to #Banstheman! – after the break.

Infographic: The Pritzker Prize 1979 – 2014

Yesterday, was announced as the 38th recipient of the Pritzker Prize, the latest in a long line of talented architects (as well as the seventh Japanese recipient). Learn more about the Prize and its winners after the break! 

15 Things You Didn’t Know About Shigeru Ban

Left, Image of Shigeru Ban © Flickr User VisiOkrOniK. Right, from top to bottom, Ban’s Temporary Paper Studio (© Didier Boy de la Tour), the Japan Pavilion for the Hanover Exhibition 2000 (© Hiroyuki Hirai), and his design for “Architecture for Dogs” (© Hiroshi Yoda).

You probably know by now that Shigeru Ban has won this year’s Pritzker Prize, but did you know he almost went to university to play rugby? Or that he constructed his home without pulling down a single tree? These and many more fun facts on the 38th Pritzker laureate, after the break.

Shigeru Ban Named Pritzker Laureate 2014

Courtesy of Architects

“Shigeru Ban is a tireless architect whose work exudes optimism. Where others may see insurmountable challenges, Ban sees a call to action. Where others might take a tested path, he sees the opportunity to innovate. He is a committed teacher who is not only a role model for younger generation, but also an inspiration.” — Pritzker Jury 2014

Citing his innovative approach to structure and material as well as his commitment to compassionate design, the Pritzker Jury has selected Japanese architect Shigeru Ban as the 2014 winner of the Pritzker Prize. Ban is the thirty-eighth recipient of the Pritzker Prize and its seventh Japanese recipient.

Ban, who studied at Sci-Arc and Cooper Union, first gained international recognition for his experimental, creative use of unconventional , particularly paper and cardboard. However, he has more recently gained fame for bringing low-cost, high-quality design to those most in need of it, such as refugees and victims of natural disaster.

According to the jury, the Pritzker Prize recognizes architects who both display “excellence in built work and who make a significant and consistent contribution to humanity.” Shigeru Ban, whose approach is as innovative as it is humanitarian, “reflects this spirit of the prize to the fullest.”

Read the Jury’s full citation after the break…

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Melnikov House Listed As Cultural Heritage Site

© ArchDaily instagram user, dbasulto

UPDATE: The ArchCouncil of Moscow reports that the Melnikov House has been listed as a cultural heritage site of federal value, an important step in its conservation. The following article first appeared on ArchDaily on April 23rd, 2013. 

Peter Eisenman, Steven Holl, and Rem Koolhaas are among the many architects who have signed a letter pleading for the of one of Konstantin Melnikov’s greatest works, the Melnikov House. As we reported in December of 2012, the Melnikov’s house 83-year old foundations have weakened considerably since the onset of neighboring construction. Unfortunately, the situation has only worsened “significantly” over the last few months.

Read more about the state of the Melnikov House, and what architects are doing to try and prevent its deterioration, after the break…

Eight Ingenious Interiors

In case you missed it, we’re re-publishing this popular post for your material pleasure. Enjoy!

Continuing with our -themed posts celebrating the launch of AD Materials (our US product catalog), we decided to round-up eight materials/products (from a light fixture made from woven irrigation hoses – really – to a wall made from shoeboxes) that make their interiors truly ingenious. Enjoy!

Want to Intern for ArchDaily? Now’s Your Chance!

UPDATE: Applications have now closed.

ArchDaily is in need of a select group of architecture-obsessed, writing-loving interns to join our team for 2014 (April – August)! If you want to spend your days researching/writing about the best architecture around the globe – and find out what it takes to work for the world’s most visited architecture website – then read on after the break…

Unpublished / CLOG

Courtesy of

Each edition of CLOG poses a particular challenge to the reader: by showcasing such a variety of distinct view points, teasing out the central, connective themes is far from an easy task. It requires analysis, thought, and most of all time – which is, of course, entirely the point. CLOG seeks to “slow things down” so that the greater issues of architectural discourse are mulled over and explored.

The latest CLOG, however, Unpublished, has two central points that quickly, easily emerge. Pick up CLOG: Unpublished if you want to learn two things: (1) about how and why certain publications choose the architecture they publish ( included); or (2) about works that have, for their geographical location or problematic nature, been forgotten from the “idealized narratives” of architecture

In Honor of Pi Day, A Round-Up of Round Architecture

Happy Pi Day everyone! To celebrate the circle and its influence on architecture, we’ve decided to round up some rounded structures. First up, Roll It, a cool experimental house/cylinder. Second, Villa Vals, the hobbit-like neighbor of Zumthor‘s Therme Vals (designed underground to maintain the bath houses’ extensive views). Then, the stacked, rounded form of the Kauffman Center for the Performing Arts, designed by Moshe Safdie for optimal sound reflection. Next up, Galaxy Soho, designed by the queen of curvature, Zaha Hadid. And – last but not least – the “mothership” itself, Foster + Partners‘ design for Apple’s new campus, scheduled for completion in 2016.

Aires Mateus Chosen to Design University of Architecture, Tournai

Courtesy of Aires Mateus

The prestigious Portuguese office Aires Mateus – formed by brothers Manuel and Francisco Aires Mateus – has won a competition to design the new headquarters of the University of Architecture in , Belgium.

INFOGRAPHIC: Materials in Architecture (A History)

In case you missed it, we’re re-publishing this popular post for your material pleasure. Enjoy!

To celebrate AD Materials turning two three (months that is), we decided to dig a bit deeper into the we know and love. What’s their history? When did they first come to use – and where? How? If you want to know more about the lives – past and present – of concrete, glass, steel, and more, check out our fantastic new after the break!

Smiljan Radic to Design 2014 Serpentine Pavilion

© 2014 Studio

Joining the ranks of Sou Fujimoto (2013), Herzog & de Meuron and Ai Weiwei (2012),Peter Zumthor (2011),Jean Nouvel (2010),SANAA (2009),and more, little-known Chilean architect Smiljan Radic will be the fourteenth architect to design London’s Serpentine Gallery Pavilion. Renderings of his design reveal a semi-translucent, cylindrical structure that rests on large quarry stones.The pavilion, to open June 26th, will remain in Kensington Gardens for four months.

Although Radic has constructed little outside his home country, his work has gained attention due to its versatility and attention to context. If you’re unfamiliar, we recommend checking out Mestizo Restaurant, which similarly incorporates stone into its design, as well as his most recent. Julia Peyton-Jones, Director, and Hans Ulrich Obrist, Co-Director, of the Serpentine Galleries explained their choice: “We have been intrigued by [Radic’s] work ever since our first encounter with him at the Venice Architecture Biennale 2011 [sic]. Radic is a key protagonist of an amazing architectural explosion in Chile. While enigmatically archaic, in the tradition of romantic follies, Radic’s designs for the Pavilion also look excitingly futuristic, appearing like an alien space pod that has come to rest on a Neolithic site. We cannot wait to see his Pavilion installed on the Serpentine Gallery’s lawn this summer.”

More info and images after the break…

Infographic: ArchDaily, The Past 6 Years

Six years ago, we had a crazy idea: let’s create a platform to give architects exposure, no matter where they come from or how famous they may be. Let’s put them side by side with architectural greats. Let’s make that platform absolutely free and accessible to whomever wants to be inspired by it. Let’s give architects the inspiration, knowledge, and tools they need to make our rapidly urbanizing world a better place.

In six short years, we went from an idea to the most visited architecture web site in the world, with over 300,000 daily readers, a staff of over 50 people working in 9 different countries, and three local versions: ArchDaily BrasilArchDaily México and Plataforma Arquitectura (and a fourth coming soon!). This is our story.