Rory Stott

Andrew Burges Architects Wins Competition for Park and Aquatic Centre in Sydney’s Green Square

© Andrew Burges Architects via www.cityofsydney.nsw.gov.au

The City of Sydney has selected the team of Andrew Burges Architects working with Grimshaw and TCL, as the winners of a competition to design a new park and aquatic centre in Green Square, around 4 kilometres to the South of central Sydney. One of the city’s six “Major Development Zones,” the park and aquatic centre is part of a larger development in the centre of Green Square, with an adjacent site slated for a new public square and library.

Check Out These Images of New York’s Skyline in 2018

View looking south above Central Park showing “Billionaires Row” towers visible in foregorund, midtown towers in background, and various Financial District and Downtown Brooklyn Towers in far background. Image © CityRealty

If New Yorkers thought that construction during Michael Bloomberg’s tenure as Mayor was frantic, then what’s coming next might be quite a shock: courtesy of CityRealty, these images show the skyline in 2018, when many of the city’s current projects will be complete. Produced from building models by TJ Quan and Ondel Hylton as a marketing ploy for Jean Nouvel‘s which recently (finally) began construction, the images include all of Nouvel’s illustrious future neighbors: the “Billionaire’s Row” including 111 West 57th Street, 220 Central Park South, 225 West 57th Street (Nordstrom Tower) and One57; new Midtown developments such as 432 Park Avenue, 520 Park Avenue425 Park Avenue, One Vanderbilt, 610 Lexington, 15 Penn Plaza, and the Hudson Yards towers; and even the latest financial district towers, 1WTC, 30 Park Place, 125 Greenwich, and 225 Cherry Street.

UK Government Confirms Protection of Title Will Continue

One of the more embarrassing examples of the ARB’s ‘mission creep’ which the review may address came in 2012, when they demanded that media organizations cease to refer to Renzo Piano, designer of the Shard, as an architect. Image © Eric Smerling

The UK government’s Department for Communities and Local Government (DCLG) has concluded that UK architecture should continue to be governed by “light-touch regulation based on protection of title,” following the first phase of a review into the future of the Architects Registration Board (ARB). Now, a second phase of the review promises to investigate options to deliver this regulation, determining whether or not it is best achieved by the ARB.

A statement released by the DCLG says that it will now work “with all parts of the profession to identify opportunities to simplify the role of the regulator,” with BD Online reporting that the available options including absorbing the role of the ARB into that of the Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA), or to keep the ARB as an independent body – but with the DCLG warned that “it should not be assumed that an independent regulatory body would necessarily have the same form or role as the existing regulatory body.”

Shigeru Ban Included Among Foreign Policy’s 100 Leading Global Thinkers

Courtesy of Courtesy of Architects

Shigeru Ban has been included in Foreign Policy Magazine’s 100 Leading Global Thinkers of 2014, dubbing this year’s Pritzker Prize Laureate as “architecture’s first responder.” The annual list recognizes the 100 people whose ideas and actions have had the greatest impact on the outcome of world events, and this year ‘disruption’ is the buzzword; acknowledging a tumultuous year, the list focuses on the people who, for better or worse, “smashed the world as we know it.”

Ten Practices Selected to Design €400 Million “Oaks Prague” Scheme

Design by . Image Courtesy of Arendon Development Company

The Czech Republic-based Arendon Development Company has selected seven British practices and three Czech practices to work together on Oaks Prague, a new €400 million, 220-home “residential and lifestyle development” 20 kilometres South-East of Prague within the commune of Popivičky.

Selected through a competition organized by Malcolm Reading Consultants, the ten practices will join the team of Edward Durell Stone Jr and Associates, who masterplanned the development to include a golf club, hotel and spa at its centre, and John Thompson & Partners, who developed a pattern book and style guide for Oaks Prague.

Read on after the break for the full list of selected architects

Grimshaw Releases New Images of World’s Largest Airport Terminal in Istanbul

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New images have been released of Istanbul‘s new airport, designed by Grimshaw, Nordic Office of Architecture and Haptic Architects, assisted by local Turkish Partners GMW Mimarlik and Tekeli Sisa. Projected to be the world’s largest airport terminal under a single roof at almost one million square metres, the new airport is expected to serve 90 million passengers a year on the opening of the first phase, rising to 150 million a year after completion in 2018.

TED Talk: How MASS Design Group Gave the Word “Architecture” a Meaning in Rwanda

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In one of the eight talks that make up the TED Prize-winning City2.0, MASS Design Group Co-founder and Chief Operating Officer Alan Ricks explains how MASS designed and built the Butaro Hospital in Rwanda, in 2008 when ”there wasn’t even a word for ‘architect’” in Kinyarwanda, the national language. Now thanks in part to their work, and the commitment of the many MASS Design Fellows in the area, Rwanda has a more formalized market for architectural services and even a new architecture program at Kigali Institute of Science and Technology.

Through anecdotes and testimonials from others involved (including everyone from the hospital gardener to Rwanda’s Minister for Health), Ricks demonstrates that no matter what the context, architecture can and should find opportunities in the local environment that bring not only health benefits but also economic benefits, jobs and even dignity.

20th Century Society Presents 100 Buildings 100 Years at the Royal Academy of Art

1952: Stockwell Bus Garage, . Image © John East

The 20th Century Society was founded in the 1970s, to protect British architectural heritage which was built from 1914 onwards - following from the protection of the Victorian Society, which protects architecture from the 19th century up until 1914. This year, to celebrate the one hundred years of architectural heritage which they are sworn to protect, they have selected one building from each year, presenting one hundred of the best, most interesting or most loved buildings from the last century with their 100 Buildings 100 Years project.

The 100 selected buildings are featured in an ongoing exhibition at the Royal Academy in London, and also feature in a new book published by Batsford Books. Read on after the break to learn more about 100 Buildings 100 Years, and see a selection of the chosen buildings from the past hundred years.

Juhani Pallasmaa and Diébédo Francis Kéré Honored in 2014 Schelling Architecture Awards

Centre for Earth Architecture / Kere Architecture. Image ©

The Schelling Architecture Foundation has announced Juhani Pallasmaa and Diébédo Francis Kéré as the recipients of its Architecture Theory and Architecture Prizes, respectively, for 2014. Awarded once every two years since 1994, the Schelling Prizes are prestigious awards that historically have been reasonable predictors of the Pritzker Prize, with Zaha Hadid, Peter Zumthor, Kazuyo Sejima and Wang Shu all receiving a Schelling Architecture Prize some years before their Pritzker Prize.

This year, the Schelling Prize’s “indigenous ingenuity” theme was inspired by the 2012 Theory winner Kenneth Frampton‘s theory of Critical Regionalism, with the prize asking ”how can inventive and directly comprehensible architecture satisfy human needs in an appealing way?”

More on the winners after the break

Heatherwick’s Garden Bridge Gains First Planning Approval

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Lambeth Council has awarded planning permission for the Garden Bridge, Thomas Heatherwick and Arup‘s planned crossing of the Thames which has been proposed and supported by actress Joanna Lumley. The approval is the first in a series that the bridge needs to become a reality, with Westminster City Council, London mayor Boris Johnson and Communities Secretary Eric Pickles all still needing to sign off on the project, according to the Architects’ Journal.

Get to Grips with Guggenheim Helsinki’s Record-Breaking Competition with this Infographic Video

By now, when the design competition for the Guggenheim Helsinki is mentioned, one number probably comes to mind: 1,715, the record-breaking number of submissions which the competition received. But how can this number be put into perspective? Why, with more numbers of course. Take 5,769 for example, which is the total height in meters of all the A1 presentation boards arranged vertically. Or take 18,336,780, the estimated value in Euros of all the work submitted.

Check out this great video from Taller de Casquería, which gives a rundown of all of the mind-blowing statistics generated by the competition, and concludes with this strong message to the Guggenheim itself: “These are incredible figures that show the impact that the Foundation has throughout the world…  should document this to recognize their success in helping to shape a global community, dedicated to visual culture.”

Can Good Architecture Be as Calming as Meditation?

Louis Kahn’s Salk Institute was among the “contemplative architecture” that the researchers used during the study. Image © Flickr CC User dreamsjung

If ever architects needed a little vindication in their work, this might just be it: a team of neuroscientists have found evidence that good architecture can positively affect the human brain. Testing a highly susceptible group of subjects (i.e. architects), the team demonstrated that so-called “contemplative architecture” can have similar effects to meditation – except with much less effort on the part of the person experiencing it. This article in the Atlantic discusses the team’s work at length, delving into the science behind the discovery, but also uncovering an interesting oddity in the world of architectural : it seems not much is being done because ”it’s difficult to suggest that people are dying from it.” In the case of the current study, the team “totally loaded the deck” by only selecting architects as their subjects, apparently not aiming to prove anything but simply to secure further funding. Read the full article here for more on the latest in architectural neuroscience.

Nadau Lavergne Architects Present Proposal to Revitalize Detroit’s Decaying Packard Plant

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Nadau Lavergne Architects, the winning team of the Reanimate the Ruins international ideas contest, have shared with us their proposal to revive Detroit‘s historic Packard Automotive Plant, the former factory which has become an icon of the city’s post-industrial decline. By developing a proposal which frees the land from unwanted structures and knits the colossal 1 kilometer-long building back into the urban landscape, Nadau Lavergne Architects have created a design which returns both a sense of community and some economic hope back to the building.

Read more about the proposal after the break

Video: Why Should Architects be Concerned About Mobility?

With the rising success of electric and the highly anticipated introduction of self-driving , it is beginning to look like the ‘end of the automobile age’ which many predicted just a few years ago may never come. This was the sentiment presented by Audi CEO Rupert Stadler at the presentation of the Audi Urban Future Award last night: “The car has to be seen once again as a desirable object of progress,” he demanded. “To achieve this, we have to tear down the walls between infrastructure, public and individual traffic.” Audi’s New Urban Agenda therefore sets its sights on “solutions in which individual transportation makes a positive contribution in an overall system of different forms of mobility.”

The award, which saw Team Mexico City win with their proposal to crowd source up-to-the-minute traffic data which informs traffic planning decisions, highlights the relationship between cars, urban planning and ultimately architecture. “We have left mobility to the transportation experts for too many decades,” says Jose Castillo, a Harvard Professor and leader of Team Mexico City. “Nowadays thinking about urban space and infrastructure, this is something that architects have a lot to say about.”

Check out our video from the event above, where we asked participants from each of the four teams to outline in their view “why should architects be concerned about mobility?”

AR Issues: Architecture Has Nothing in Common with Luxury Goods

Courtesy of The Architectural Review

ArchDaily is continuing our partnership with The Architectural Review, bringing you short introductions to the themes of the magazine’s monthly editions. In this editorial from AR’s November 2014 issue, AR Editor Catherine Slessor uses the opening of Frank Gehry’s Fondation Louis Vuitton as occasion to examine the split that has developed within the architectural profession, musing “On how architecture can be either manifestation of vanity or source of social transformation.”

One of the most depressing illustrations of how far architecture has lost its grip on reality is Frank Gehry’s new handbag. Along with other selected ‘iconoclasts’ from the world of fashion, art and design, Gehry was tasked by French luxury goods purveyor to design a bespoke limited edition ‘piece’. Gehry’s new Fondation Louis Vuitton has just opened in Paris and he is the man of the hour, so it seems obvious that after designing a monumental repository for contemporary art, he should turn his hand to the trifling matter of a fashion accessory. The handbag is yours for £2490. The art museum is yours for around £100 million, though some speculate that it cost much, much more.

Renzo Piano Gains Planning Permission for Shard-Adjacent Residential Tower

View from Guy’s Hospital Quad. Image © RPBW

Renzo Piano Building Workshop has been awarded planning approval for Feilden House, a 26-storey residential building at London Bridge Quarter, directly adjacent to the Shard. Designed to complement the Shard and Place Buildings, the third piece of Piano‘s Bridge Developments will add “generous public realm amenities” to the area at ground level.

Chicago Biennial: “The State of the Art of Architecture” Will Feature Photo Series by Iwan Baan

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The inaugural Chicago Architecture Biennial now has an official name, with co-directors Joseph Grima and Sarah Herda announcing “The State of the Art of Architecture” as the biennial’s theme last week. Taking its name from a 1977 conference organized in Chicago by Stanley Tigerman, which focused on the state of architecture in the US, next year’s Architecture Biennial will aim to expand that conversation into the “international and intergenerational” arena.

In addition to the new name, the Biennial also announced its first major project, a photo essay of Chicago by Iwan Baan, which will contextualize the many landmarks of the Chicago skyline within the wider cityscape and within the day-to-day life of the city.

Read on for more about the biennial theme and more images from Iwan Baan. 

Architecture for Humanity Announces Completion of Haiti Initiatives

Collège Mixte Le Bon Berger. Image Courtesy of

Architecture for Humanity has announced the end of their program in Haiti, effective from January 2015. The charitable organization, which has its headquarters in San Francisco, set up offices in Port-au-Prince in March 2010 in order to better help the people of after the 2010 earthquake. Through almost five years in , they have completed nearly 50 projects, including homes, medical clinics, offices, and the 13 buildings in their School Initiative. Their work has positively affected the lives of over 1 million Haitians, with their schools initiative alone providing education spaces for over 18,000 students.

Read on after the break for more on the end of Architecture for Humanity’s Haiti program, and images of their completed schools