Karen Cilento

Istanbul Modern joins YAP

Wendy / HWKN's winning design of Young Architect’s Program 2012

Each year, we look forward to the varied entries and the selected finalists of the MoMA + MoMA PS1 Young Architects Program for an outdoor recreational area within PS1’s triangular entrance courtyard and outdoor sculpture area.   YAP began in 2000 as a way to strengthen the relationship between and PS1, and the program provides opportunities for emerging architects to showcase their talent and give back to the community.   Now, the program is expanding even more as and PS1 have announced a new partnership with the Istanbul Museum of Modern Art.  Such a partnership will further expand YAP’s international reach (in 2011, MoMA and MoMA PS1 partnered with MAXXI in Rome to create the first international YAP, and then, partnered with cultural organization CONSTRUCTO in Santiago,Chile).

More about the new partnership after the break.

Update: Institute for Contemporary Art / Steven Holl Architects

Institute for Contemporary Art / . Photo by ArchDaily

Recently, we visited the Meulensteen gallery to hear an update on Steven Holl’s latest project in  - the Institute for Contemporary Art at Commonwealth University.   Slated for completion in 2015, the project was presented in a series of Holl’s trademark watercolors and models, complete with a slideshow given by project architect Dimitra Tsachrelia who previously worked on the Glasgow School of Art for the firm.  As we shared earlier, the project’s formal gestures are a reaction to its site context along the busy intersection of Richmond at Broad and Belvidere, with the intention to create an open gateway with a building that forks in the X-Y direction to illustrate the “non-linear” path of art, and torques in the Z direction to shape a dynamic volume of circulation.   Although the weather was quite unforgiving, those who packed into the gallery enjoyed Tsachrelia’s friendly demeanor as she walked us through the process and progress of the project.

More about the event after the break. 

Walking the City / The Municipal Art Society

© Iwan Baan. Featured in MAS' New to : Broadway's Cultural Corridor Walk

During the summer months, The Municipal Art Society will be leading over two dozen urban design and architecture tours throughout New York.   MAS is a non-profit membership organization committed to making New York a more livable city through education, dialogue and advocacy for intelligent urban planning, design and preservation. Since 1956, MAS has been offering such tours as a way to share knowledge and spread appreciation for New York’s varied cityscape.  The tours are conducted by architectural, urban, and art historians, urban geographers, architects, teachers and writers, and offer a way to explore historic, evolving and “renewed” neighborhoods, the waterfront and specific residential and commercial projects.  The tours will explore some neighborhoods we have featured on ArchDaily, such as Gansevoort with a look at apartments designed by Asymptote, the High Line and the construction site for the new Whitney Museum of American Art.   And, even older gems such as New York’s Art Deco buildings from the 1950s.

Interested in exploring the brownstones of Brooklyn or learning more about the Pre-Stonewall Greenwich Village? Or, ever wonder how streets such as Bridge, Gold, and Broad got their names?  Wherever your architectural interest lay, be sure to view the complete list of tours and take advantage of the great weather and the abundance of architecture New York has to share. For more information about specific tours, be sure to check out their website.  And, perhaps take a look at our City Guide to further your adventures!

Update: Teachers Village / Meier & Partners


Over the years, we have been sharing the design and following the development of Richard Meier’s Newark complex which, earlier this year, began breaking ground.  While the project will cost a cool $150 million, the urban efforts are meant to reinvigorate downtown Newark to restore the city to its former glory of the 1950s.   During the early 2000s, developer Ron Beit purchased dozens of lots in downtown Newark in preparation for the area’s larger master planning vision which now includes plans for commercial and residential programs aimed at appealing to teachers.   Such a move will create a new sense of community, explained Michael Duffy, previously the heard of the City’s charter school office, “Best-case scenario, they’ll [teachers] register to vote there, they’ll get involved civically in the community, they’ll see the success of Newark as their success.  There are undeniably class differences between the kids who are coming in to teach in our school or to work as tutors and the young children that we serve as a school. So we have work to do in bridging the gaps between those two groups, and perhaps Teachers Village could be the place where gaps get bridged.”

More about the development after the break.

Semper Kaleidoscope / sTARTT

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Our friends from Italian design firm sTARTT have shared their most recent restoration project which transforms an abandoned warehouse into a spatial urban kaleidoscope.  Situated in the historic center in Porfiri of the Latina Province, the area is marked by architectonic elements from the city’s earliest foundation that now co‐exist with “inconsistent” contemporary parts of the center.  In that sense, the project seeks to bring a continuity to the context, as sTARTT has envisioned a way to allow users to appreciate the historic roots of their city within a contemporary atmosphere.

More about the project after the break.

Tianjin Art Museum / KSP Jürgen Engel Architekten

© International GmbH

Architect: KSP Jürgen Engel Architekten
Client: Command Key Projects, Bureau of Urban Planning,
Competition Date: April 2009
Completion Date: May 2012
Site: 29.800 m²

Just three short years ago, German firm KSP Jürgen Engel Architekten placed first in an international competiton for the design of the Tianjin Art Museum.  This week, the museum has opened its doors to the public to enjoy galleries filled with Chinese calligraphy, western art, sculpture, and modern art.  Located along the lakeside promenade, the Art Museum enhances Tianjin’s cultural district and completes the 90-hectare development area, along with a library, an opera house and another new museum designed by various architects.

More images, drawings, and more about the art museum after the break.

Sound Portal / BE OPEN

at the Design Festival

While the excitement builds for the Olympic Games this summer, London is also preparing for their Design Festival of mid-September.  In a joint effort between Arup and Sound and Music, the installation at Trafalgar Square will focus on the idea of design you cannot see by creating a black rubberized portal that will transport visitors to inaccessible places and remote environments through a series of three-dimensional soundscapes created by leading musicians and sound designers.  By isolating the sense of sound, visitors will be submerged in a completely new environment as they stand in one of the busiest squares in the world.

More about BE OPEN after the break.

Arnhem Central Platforms / UNStudio

Courtesy . © Ronald Tilleman

Architects: UNStudio, Ben van Berkel with Arjan Dingsté and Marc Hoppermann, Marc Herschel, Derrick Diporedjo, Kristin Sandner, Rein Werkhoven
Location: Arnhem, the Netherlands
Client: ProRail, utrecht
Engineering: Movares
Contractor: DAM-Dura Vermeer
Gross Roof Area: approximately 8700 m2
Dimensions: 4 platform roofs of approximately 210 metres long, with varying widths from 9-14 metre
Structure and materials: steel, aluminum and cold formed glass roofs
Start of construction: 2009
Planned completion date: 2011

In terms of scale, we typically feature massive projects by UNStudio – such as their Kutaisi Airport, planning scheme for Union Station, and grand performance venues – which all bring the contemporary aesthetic of Ben van Berkel to meet the projects’ respective programmatic and contextual demands.  Recently, van Berkel’s team has crafted a covering for the Netherlands’ central rail line, bringing their elegant touch to a structure blanketing four train platforms measuring 210 meters in length.

More about the platform coverings after the break.

Musée de la Romanitée Narbonne / Foster + Partners

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Foster + Partners was awarded first prize for their museum design in collaboration with Adrien Gardere for Narbonne in southern .  The museum’s central collection includes more than 1,000 ancient stone relief funerary blocks excavated from a nearby archaeological site, as Narbonne’s historical past as a vital Roman port has left an impressive legacy of buildings and ancient relics.  Within the new design, Foster + Partners has created a wall to insert the stones that will act as a natural barrier to separate the public galleries from the more private restoration spaces.  The building will also reinforce the strong landscape connection between water and gardens due to the site’s adjacency to the Canal du Midi.

More about the museum design after the break.

Going Viral + The ArchDaily Story

Going Viral at the Center for Architecture © ArchDaily


Last night, dozens packed into the Center for Architecture to join the conversation among some of the most influential in our field.   With the energy levels high, panelists Bjarke Ingels of BIG and Mark Collins of Morpholio and  Cloud Lab Columbia University GSAPP,  and ArchDaily founders David Basulto and David Assael, shared insight into the impact social media and technology have on our profession and the way in which we design.  While the panelists all share a background in design, their differences in applying technology to their particular niche  – whether to aid the design process, to collect and redistribute data, or to share information and bring awareness  -  fueled a dynamic dialogue that kept the crowd engaged and informed way past the closing hours of the Center for Architecture.

Read on for the story behind ArchDaily, and, if you happened to catch the event, let us know in the comments below.

In Progress: Cleveland Museum / Farshid Moussavi

/ Farshid Moussavi. © Dan Michaels/Westlake Reed Leskosky
Nearly two years ago, we introduced Farshid Moussavi’s first major US building – a sleek geometrical design for Cleveland’s Museum of Contemporary Art.  With its strong formal moves, the museum intends to aid the city’s urban-revitalization efforts by shaping an iconic cultural destination alongside its neighboring concentration of museums, such as the Cleveland Museum of Art and the Cleveland Museum of Natural History.   MOCA Executive Director Jill Snyder says, “We believe MOCA is contributing a great building to  Cleveland, one that will stimulate critical thinking and animate social exchange. MOCA is expanding its scope and activities on all fronts, supported by new architecture that allows for flexibility, unconventionality, and technological capacity in the presentation of contemporary art.”  The 34,000 sqf building is nearing completion, and a public opening will be celebrated in early October with the inaugural exhibition, Inside Out and from the Ground Up, featuring an in-depth look at how international artists engage with architecture and spatial ideas.

More about the project, including facade photos, after the break. 

Update: Dwight D. Eisenhower Memorial / Frank Gehry

Gehry presenting original vision / via Architizer

Earlier this week at a meeting given by the Eisenhower Memorial Commission, unveiled a revamped design for the controversial Dwight D. Eisenhower Memorial for the Mall at the base of Capitol Hill, Washington D.C.   This redesign responds to strong family objections in which Gehry’s vision had been criticized for largely misrepresenting the strength and achievements of the former Commander in Chief (check out our previous coverage of the controversial memorial and its heated meeting on March 20 here).   After being selected to design the memorial in 2010 by the Eisenhower Memorial Commission, Gehry looked to highlight the President’s great achievements as a source of inspiration to children, to “give them courage to pursue their dreams and to remind them that this great man started out just like them.”

The original design featured an 80-foot high colonnade from which large metal tapestries hang, and a statue depicting Eisenhower as a youth gazing upon his future accomplishments.  To Gehry, the memorial celebrated a hero who was deeply proud of his Kansas roots and an icon children could identify with; to Eisenhower’s surviving family members, particularly granddaughters Susan and Anne Eisenhower, the design diminished the President’s accomplishments by depicting Ike as a “dreamy boy”.

More about the new design after the break.

Update: ABI April

Source AIA via the WSJ

And, we are back with our monthly updates of the Architecture Billings Index.  Last month looked promising as March marked the fifth consecutive positive rating.  However, April’s index has been calculated as 48.4 – a drop from March’s 50.4.  The index has been a roller coaster ride of slight positive trends followed by negative setbacks, and AIA Chief Economist, Kermit Baker, explains, “Considering the continued volatility in the overall economy, this decline in demand for design services isn’t terribly surprising.  Also, favorable conditions during the winter months may have accelerated design billings, producing a pause in projects that have moved ahead faster than expected.”

More about April’s index after the break.

Europa City / Manuelle Gautrand Architecture

© Luxigon

Parisian architect, Manuelle Gautrand, has shared her massive cultural, recreational and retail center for Triangle de Gonesse, with us.  The competition proposal intends to showcase a variety of European countries’ features – with regard to retail, leisure and cultural amenities – by organizing specific areas for designated countries.

More about the proposal after the break.

Andronikos Hotel Interiors / Klab Architecture

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Greek firm, KLab Architecture, has designed a series of suites for Mykonos, one of the most popular summertime destinations (the island’s population rises from 10,000 to 50,000 seasonally).  As is typical of KLab’s work (check out their Urban Cubes project previously featured), their hotel project looks to the vernacular language of island’s vocabulary and capitalizes on the environment’s relationship between the landscape and the sea, to formulate a modern interpretation of the cycladic architecture that has evolved over centuries.

More about the hotel room design after the break. 

AD Interviews: Santiago Calatrava

2012 Commencement. Photo by René Perez.

Earlier this week, Pratt Institute extended an invitation to the ArchDaily team to attend their 123rd commencement, celebrating the achievements of  1300 bachelor’s and master’s degree candidates at Radio City Music Hall.   The event also marked a special day of recognition for four honorary degree recipients:  artist/curator/critic Ai Weiwei, architect, engineer and artist Santiago Calatrava, patron on the arts and education Kathryn Chenault, and the Metropoitan Museum of Art’s longest-serving director Philippe de Montebello.

We were privileged to have an opportunity to congratulate Mr. Calatrava on his doctor of architecture degree, and pose ArchDaily’s traditional interview questions.   Mr. Calatrava’s contributions to the professions of architecture and engineering can be found scattered across the world, and bring a sense of dynamism that result from the merge between art and technology, expression and functionality.

Calatrava’s charm and good humor made for a friendly conversation that we hope you enjoy.

Update: Union Station / EE&K + UNStudio

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We recently shared six conceptual visions for the transformation of Los Angeles’ Union Station.  Upon the release of the vision boards, the team’s proposals (EE&K, a Perkins Eastman Company, in association with ; IBI Group with Foster+Partners; Grimshaw with Gruen; Moore Ruble Yudell Architects and Planners, with Ten Arquitectos and West 8;  with Ingenhoven Architects; and Renzo Piano Building Workshop with Parsons Transportation Group Inc.) sparked much public interest.  As we reported earlier, the  Metro staff will recommend a winner to the Metro board on June 28th, but in the meantime, we’d like to share a closer look at some of the proposals.

UNStudio’s proposal with EE&K imagines Union Station as a multi-modal transit hub filled with mixed use development and outdoor spaces.  The conceptual vision board explores possibilities for the station and its surrounding areas, highlighting a key integration of transportation and outdoor park spaces with its “green loop” strategy.

More about the vision board after the break.

Marina Abramovic Institute + OMA

Southwest Facade © OMA

Yesterday, Marina Abramović and OMA announced the creation of the Marina Abramović Institute for the Preservation of Performance Art (MAI) under the performance dome at ’s PS 1 in Long Island City.  Abramović will team with the architects to create an art, education and performance venue that will not only focus on Abramović’s performance methods, but, interestingly, on educating the public with regards to viewing and appreciating long duration performances.

Perhaps, Abramović’s name sounds familiar, and rightly so.  She has wildly been hailed as one of the most progressive and devoted long-duration performers; one of her most recent performances took place at the MoMA where she sat completely silent, just starring at visitors for the museum’s entire opening hours.   And, now, with this Institute, Abramović will be able to teach her ways to aspiring performers, and more viewers will be able to experience and appreciate her performance methods.  Abramović commented, “The Institute’s aim is to protect and preserve the intellectual and spiritual legacy of performance art from the 1970′s into the future, and will serve as an homage to time-based and immaterial art.”