David Basulto

Graduate Architect. Co Founder and Executive Editor of ArchDaily.com. Architecture geek.

World Building of the Year: Auckland Art Gallery Toi o Tamaki / FJMT + Archimedia

Auckland Art Gallery Toi o Tamaki / + Archimedia

At the last day of the World Architecture Festival, the winners of each category had their chance to showcase their projects in front of the jury and the audience. The jury, which included Ken Tadashi Oshima (University of Washington), Ken Yeang (Llewelyn Davies Yeang), Patrick Bellew (Atelier Ten), Jeanne Gang (Studio Gang Architects) and Dietmar Eberle (Baumschlager Eberle), gave the World Building of the Year Award to the new Auckland Art Gallery Toi o Tamaki, by Francis-Jones Morehen Thorp (FJMT) and Archimedia

The new Auckland Art Gallery Toi o Tamaki is an extensive public project that includes the restoration and adaption of heritage buildings; a new building extension which more than doubles the public exhibition areas; extensive basement storage and support areas; and the redesign of adjacent areas of Albert Park. The design creates an openness and transparency to allow views through, into and out of the gallery circulation and display spaces into the green landscape of Albert Park. The architecture developed from a concept which relates as much to the organic natural forms of the landscape as it does to the architectural order and character of the heritage buildings.

The collection of the gallery can be visited online at the Google Cultural Institute.

“The winning project transcended category types. You could say it is about new and old, or civic and community, or display. It contrasts the manmade and the natural, and the relationship between art and science. This is a major design achievement in a seismic zone, providing an example of design pragmatism and a carful reworking which does no more than it needs to until it is required. Balancing many different elements, the resulting design is a rich complex of built ideas.” – Paul Finch, WAF Director.

Other awarded projects at the WAF were the Australian Garden by Taylor Cullity Lethlean + Paul Thompson (Landscape Project of the Year) and the National Maritime Museum in China by Cox Rayner Architects (Future Project of the Year).

Winners of the World Architecture Festival 2013

The first two days of the World Architecture Festival 2013 have been intense. Keynotes by Charles Jencks and Dietmer Eberle, and several other lectures, have filled the auditorium and the festival hall stage, while hundreds of architects watch the live “crits,” where firms present their projects in front of the jury and the audience. As a jury for the Health and Future Education categories, I’ve seen architects from firms from all ranges, sizes and trajectories present their shortlisted projects, a very strong selection of buildings.

After these two days the winners of each category have been announced, and today the super jury will choose the World Building of the Year, followed by a lecture by Sou Fujimoto. Stay tuned for updates via Twitter!

“From the subtle to the spectacular, from a four room house to an 80 storey tower, the sheer quality and diversity reflected in the array of projects shortlisted today demonstrates the increasingly global nature of the event. All eyes are now on the festival’s venue, the Marina Bay Sands in Singapore, where the architects will battle to win their individual categories, with the victorious projects competing for the coveted World Building of the Year award” – Paul Finch, Director of the WAF.

Check the full list of winners, highly commended entries and the jury’s comments:

Behind the Green Door: The Experts Interviews Part II

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The Oslo Architecture Triennale opened to the public last week, under the title “Behind the Green Door – Architecture and the desire for sustainability”. Rotor, the curators of the Triennale, collected over 600 objects carrying claims of sustainability from over 200 architecture offices, companies and environmental organizations across the world (read our interview with Rotor about the curation).

Experts from different fields share with us which the objects from the collection caught their attention and why. In this second and final part, Nanne de Ru (Powerhouse Company, Director of the Berlage Institute), Arild Eriksen and Joakim Skajaa (Eriksen Skajaa), Andres Lepik (Director of the Münich Architecture Museum), Nanna Bjerre Hjortenberg (The Danish Architecture Center), Willem Bruijn (Partner, Baumschlager Eberle) and Gilles Perraudin (Perraudin Architectes) tell us their what they think. From co-housing utopias, to a hospital that tries to stand over time due to its design and more. 

The Triennale is open until December 1st, full programme here. Check the rest of the videos below:

Behind the Green Door: The Experts Interviews Part I

YouTube Preview Image

The Oslo Architecture Triennale opened to the public last week, under the title “Behind the Green Door – Architecture and the desire for ”. Rotor, the curators of the Triennale, collected over 600 objects carrying claims of sustainability from over 200 architecture offices, companies and environmental organizations across the world (read our interview with Rotor about the curation).

Experts from different fields share with us which the objects from the collection caught their attention and why. In this first part Kjetil Trædal Thorsen (Snøhetta co-founder), Carolyn Steel (architect, author of The Hungry City and TED speaker), Karl Otto Ellefsen (Dean of Oslo School of Architecture and Design) and Arjen Oosterman (ARCHIS, Volume Magazine) tell us their what they think. From glass technology to filter light, to locally produced food and more.

The Triennale is open until December 1st, full programme here. Check the rest of the videos below:

Andres Jaque/Office for Political Innovation: Different Kinds of Water Pouring into a Swimming Pool

Andrés Jaque, "Different Kinds of Water Pouring Into a Swimming Pool (Wilma & Juan & Harriette)," 2013. Architectural drawing. Courtesy of the artist.

In this first solo project by Andrés Jaque / Office for Political Innovation in Los Angeles, the architect prepares an exhibition, with a series of architectural case studies based in the city of L.A., in which he problematizes the importance of such cases as places of socialization and community, leaving behind the stereotypes that characterize them as disconnected spaces, symbols of ultra-individuality and comfort.

In an interview with Orson Welles in 1964 about the witch-hunt being carried out against Hollywood celebrities during the McCarthy-era, the filmmaker pointed out a strange paradox: while many people during the Second World War had betrayed their friends to save their own lives, in the golden-age of Hollywood, people did it to save their swimming pools. Far from downplaying Orson Welles’ observation, it is nonetheless interesting how these aquatic scenarios and backyard gardens have always been seen as something superficial, destroyers of social cooperation and enemies of the political.

For Andrés Jaque, it is in these interior spaces where decisions are made, the heterogeneity that underlies the garden city is casually discussed, and the conflicts and negotiations of domestic space are established. These are almost invisible architectures, hidden betweenpalapasand high hedges, conceived from the rhythms of the human body and its daily choreography. In that sense, Andrés Jaque understands his work in a way that is very similar to performance art that since the 70s has focused on the body and its relationship to its surroundings, as the main site of artistic practice. This is a dynamic architecture, one that is in constant tension, and that prioritizes its performative quality to engage daily transformations and conflicts.

In the architect’s installation, the body is present through its absence, and the performative quality is represented symbolically by water—one of the main actors in the Californian backyard gardens. It is not arbitrary that this exhibition takes its name from David Hockney’s drawing, “Different Kinds of Waters Pouring into a Swimming Pool, Santa Monica,” 1965, made during his first years in the city. Fascinated by the way people in Los Angeles used water to help shape their private gardens into social spaces, the painting shows a series of simple pipes pouring water into a swimming pool that can’t be seen. Although the material quality of water is elusive, its representation reaches a quasi-architectural dimension, without losing its ephemeral and dynamic aspect. As such, each waterfall becomes an exclusive portrait of a common situation. This might read as a metaphor for the everyday stories that the great narratives of urbanism have left out, but these are certainly places where certain forms of citizenship and interaction essential to architectural processes occur.

The exhibitionDifferent Kinds of Water Pouring into a Swimming Poolis accompanied with a small publication by the same name that features an essay by the architect, further discussing the ideas presented in the gallery.

Andrés Jaque and the Office for Political Innovation was founded in in 2005. This architecture office explores the potential of post-foundational politics and symmetrical approaches to the sociology of technology to rethink architectural practices.

They are authors of reference buildings including Plasencia Clergy House, awarded with the Dionisio Hernández Gil Prize and finalist of the VIII Bienal Española de Arquitectura y Urbanismo; House in Never Never Land, finalist of FAD Awards and Mies van der Rohe European Award. Recently, the Museum of Modern Art of New York (MoMA) acquiredIKEA Disobedientsas the first architectural performance piece to be included in its collection. In 2012, they presented their interventionPHANTOM. Mies as Rendered Societyat Mies van der Rohe Pavilion in Barcelona. Their work has been featured in Gwangju Biennale, 2011, and the Biennale di Venezia 2010.

Andrés Jaque has been Tessenow Stipendiat in Alfred Toepfer Stiftung FVS, and he is now professor at GSAPP Graduate School of Architecture, Planning and Preservation at Columbia University in New York.

Opening: Saturday, September 21 | 7–9 PM 
Artist talk: Saturday, September 21 | 6 pm

Funded in part with generous support from Acción Cultural Española AC/E. The Standard is the official hotel of REDCAT.

AD Interviews: Marie-Ange Brayer & Frédéric Migayrou / 9th ArchiLab, Naturalizing Architecture

The 9th ArchiLab opened to the public over the weekend at the new FRAC Centre in Orléans, France.

started as an instance to question the practice of the architect, the diversification of the field, as well as the new urban challenges of our changing, globalized world. Founded by Marie-Ange Brayer (Director of the FRAC) & Frédéric Migayrou (Deputy Director of the MNAM-Centre Pompidou), it has shaped the architectural debate and served as a launch platform for many architects.

Architecture now overlaps with the sources of molecular biology, even in processes of replication, transcription and translation of genetic material. In this way, architects can introduce complex models based on processes involving the self-generation of matter and incorporating programmatic, social, material and environmental variables. Control of these processes turns hybridization into a new architectural order. 

In this interview the founders tell us more about the mission and role of ArchiLab, and also about the curation.

The exhibit of ArchiLab includes works by forty architects, designers, fashion designers and artists that are pushing forward architecture in this area. It will also include two symposiums on October 24th-25th.

Audi design wall at the Pinakothek der Moderne

Courtesy of

The Pinakothek der Moderne in Münich by Stephan Braunfels (2002) recently went through a complete renovation, and for the re opening of the museum Audi debuted the design wall, an installation that has become part of the permanent collection of the Die Neue Sammlung (The International Design Museum).

©

Aluminum is the epitome of lightness and stability. Audi has been closely associated with aluminum expertise in the automotive engineering field for many years. For the Audi installation, around 1,800 models of the legendary Ur-quattro form an “aluminum carpet”. Each of the models, weighing around 860 grams, were cut away from a seven-kilogram block of aluminum. The future of the Audi brand rises up from foundations formed of these aluminum Ur-quattros. The sculpture evoking the Audi Sport quattro concept soars up vertically. The show car translates quattro technology and its tradition in motorsport into a futuristic formal idiom. A mirror suspended on the ceiling allows visitors to explore the installation from an unusual perspective.

© ArchDaily
Courtesy of Audi

“The Audi design wall visualizes the bridge between the past and the future of our brand,” explained Prof. Dr. Ulrich Hackenberg, AUDI AG Member of the Board of Management for Technical Development. “The common thread is quattro technology, which defines Audi more than any other.” The work was devised by the Audi Design team specifically for this room in the Pinakothek der Moderne. “We created the Audi design wall with the passion of an artist and exercised maximum precision in visualizing the core technology of quattro,” commented Hackenberg in describing its evolution. The idea for the exhibit itself came from an internal competition among Audi designers. The challenge was to come up with an object that communicates with the onlooker. The Audi design wall is also visible to passers- by outside the museum.

Courtesy of Audi

The exhibition object documents the intensive collaboration between two partners from the worlds of industry and culture. “As a design-oriented carmaker, Audi is an ideal partner for Die Neue Sammlung. We plan to continue infusing the partnership with life over the coming years,” declared Prof. Dr. Florian Hufnagl, Director of Die Neue Sammlung. The museum, which opened in 1925 and now has a collection of over 80,000 objects, ranks as the oldest and largest design museum in the world.

© ArchDaily

ArchDaily 3D Printing Challenge

has opened up a whole new world for architecture. Technology that was once restricted to fabrication labs is now available to the end user – and at an affordable price. Of course, this new technology has also created the necessity to easily share 3D data over the web.

With this in mind, we have partnered with Gigabot – the biggest, most affordable 3D printer (it can print models up to 60x60x60cm) – and with Sketchfab, a new platform that is bridging the gap between the 3D models on your desktop and on the web.

We want to encourage users to start using this new technology, and what better way than to start printing the buildings we love? We invite you to model your favorite architectural classic and receive a real-life physical model, right on your doorstep.

The process is simple: model any building that is already on the AD Classics section, upload it to Sketchfab, and submit it using the following form. You’ll have two opportunities to win: ArchDaily readers will vote for one People’s Choice Award winner, and, together with Gigabot, we at ArchDaily will pick one winner as well. Both winners will be printed and shipped anywhere in the world. We’ll also make all the models available to the ArchDaily community, so anyone can add an extra layer of building information to these classics.

Submissions are open until October 1st; winners will be announced on October 7th. Read below for the full rules.

SUBMIT YOUR MODEL

AD Interviews: Richard Meier & Partners Architects

“To be an architect has been a life-long dream. Little did I know when asked at the age of 14 ‘what do you want to do when you grow up?’ I said I wanted to be an architect. After 50 years I am still learning all what that means. Working together with so many people has been enormously gratifying. Being an architect means being a member of a fantastic team.”

- Richard Meier

This year Richard Meier & Partners Architects celebrates the 50th Anniversary of Richard Meier’s prolific architecture career. And, as Richard describes in the above quote, his team has been fundamental in achieving this important milestone. Given this, we decided to interview the partners of RMA’s NY office:  Reynolds Logan, Bernhard Karpf, and Dukho Yeon.

In this video you will learn more about these partners, their career at RM&PA, and the projects they are currently working on.

You can also watch our interview with Richard Meier here.

9th ArchiLab: Naturalizing Architecture (Sept 14th 2013 – March 30th 2014)

On September 14th two interesting architecture events will take place in Orléans, Paris: The public opening of the new FRAC Centre in Orléans, Paris, designed by JAKOB + MACFARLANE and the ninth edition of

The FRAC Centre is devoted to the diffusion of contemporary art and architecture and has one of the most impressive collections of contemporary art and experimental architecture from the 1950s to today, which includes some 15,000 architectural drawings, 800 models and 600 works by artists. The permanent gallery features unique items ranging from the early models and paintings of Zaha Hadid, the paintings of the iconic illustrations found on “Delirious New York,” and even the original models of experimental houses by Shigeru Ban, Kazuyo Sejima and Sou Fujimoto. The permanent collection is a must-see for every architect. The new centre by JAKOB + MACFARLANE integrates an old military building with a new contemporary structure that features a media facade by Electronic Shadow (watch video).

Also opening to the public on September 14th, ArchiLab returns for its ninth edition, after taking a hiatus while the new FRAC Centre was being built. The lab started as an opportunity to question the practice of the architect, the diversification of the field, as well as the new urban challenges of our changing, globalized world. Founded by Marie-Ange Brayer (Director of the FRAC) & Frédéric Migayrou (Deputy Director of the MNAM-Centre Pompidou), it has shaped the architectural debate and served as a launch platform for many architects. 

The theme of this ninth edition is “Naturalizing Architecture”:

Architecture now overlaps with the sources of molecular biology, even in processes of replication, transcription and translation of genetic material. In this way, architects can introduce complex models based on processes involving the self-generation of matter and incorporating programmatic, social, material and environmental variables. Control of these processes turns hybridization into a new architectural order. 

The exhibit of ArchiLab includes works by forty architects, designers, fashion designers and artists that are pushing forward architecture in this area. It will also include two symposiums on October 24th-25th.

For more information visit the FRAC Centre website. The Centre is only a 10-minute walking distance from the Orléans train station (1 hour away from Paris Austerlitz).

As a media partner, will feature exclusive interviews with the curators and the architects in the next days, so stay tuned!

AD Interviews: Rotor, Curators of the Oslo Architecture Triennale

Stefano Boeri Architetti, Bosco Verticale, © Marco Garofalo

The Oslo Architecture Triennale, will start in just a few days under the title “Behind the Green Door – Architecture and the desire for ”. ArchDaily had the chance to talk with Rotor, the curators of the Triennale, who have collected over 600 objects carrying claims of sustainability from over 200 architecture offices, companies and environmental organizations across the world.

Most of all, we wanted to find out: what truly counts as “sustainable”? Read the complete interview after the break:

New Responsive Design for ArchDaily Mobile

Dear readers,

We have been working  hard since we launched our redesign, but most of our improvements have been under the hood. We understand that architects access not only when sitting at their offices, but at any time where inspiration and knowledge is required. Our creative minds don’t work on a fixed schedule, and it starts operating when we are commuting, walking down the street, traveling, visiting a building, or when looking out the window.

And it was in the mobile devices (phones and tablets), that accompany us all the time, where ArchDaily was falling short.

Today we are happy to announce that our new responsive design is live, replacing our outdated mobile version and eliminating all the issues our tablet visitors were having. This new layout will adjust to the screen of the device that you use to visit ArchDaily.

Our design and development team has worked hard on this version, and we know there are many things we can improve, but we wanted to get it out as soon as possible in order to get all your feedback.

So please, let us know what you think about this version, how it looks on your device, if something doesn’t work, etc. Our team will be reading the comments as always :)

best regards,

David and the ArchDaily team.

World Architecture Festival: Last Days to Register, Discount for ArchDaily Readers

The World Architecture Festival is only a few weeks away. The intense architecture event will take place between October 2nd and 4th in Singapore, a young, vibrant city where architecture is everywhere, as you can see on the above video

Hundreds of projects from 60 countries will be displayed WAF festival gallery, where 300 practices will be present. An international jury formed by 95 renowned architects will live critique the finalists, an enriching process that all visitors will be able to attend. And also, several instances for networking with people from the industry.

Speakers include Dietmar Eberle, Sou Fujimoto, Charles Jencks, and more.

readers can use code ‘ARCH’ for a special discount. Register now.

Tokyo to Host the 2020 Olympics!

© Zaha Hadid Architects

UPDATE: Minutes ago Tokyo was announced as the host of the 2020 Olympics. Zaha Hadid’s design to become the Olympic stadium.

Today the International Olympic Comitee (IOC) will choose the city that will host the 2020 Olympics, with , Tokyo and competing for the important event. The three cities just finished their presentations in Buenos Aires, Argentina, including presidents and royal members. As we await for the results, we present you the three stadiums designed to host the Olympics in each city.

More information and images:

World Architecture Festival Speakers: Sou Fujimoto, Dietmar Eberle, Charles Jencks, Jeanne Gang, and more!

The  World Architecture Festival is around the corner! On October 2nd-4th, hundreds of architects will gather in Singapore for an intense dose of architecture, in the form of panels, lectures, live crits, and more. You can see all the shortlisted projects here.

The speakers and judges list includes a long list of world renowned architects: Charles Jencks, Dietmar Eberle, Sou Fujimoto, Jeanne Gang (Studio Gang), Murat Tabanlioglu (Tabanlioglu Architects), Odile Decq (ODBC), Kim Herforth Nielse (3XN), Colin Seah (Ministry of Design), Michel Rojkind (Rojkind Arquitectos), Fernando Menis (Menis Arquitectos), Lars Autrup (Realdania), among many others!

More information about the festival and how to participate here.

To whet your appetite, here is a video of all the architecture and urban sights you can visit in Singapore:

Subscribe to the Best Newsletter in Architecture in One Easy Step

In keeping with our “Less Is More” philosophy, we rolled out a new, streamlined version of our daily newsletter a few weeks ago. By easily writing in your email below, you’ll receive an even more curated selection of projects, news, and articles every morning – the perfect complement to your daily cup of coffee. If you’re already signed-up, thank you! If not, what are you waiting for? Sign up for our new and improved newsletter now!

m.poli by Miguel de Guzmán

Spanish architecture photographer has stepped into video, a new dimension of architectural representation, as we saw a few weeks ago with his video for the Espinar House

Miguel has shared with us another video, in a short-film format, with architecture as protagonist. The m.poli kiosks, designed by Brut Deluxe, were commissioned by the city of Madrid for temporary street fairs. More than 200 units sit in the outskirts of the city when unused, creating an abandoned suburbia-like landscape that serves as the stage for the short film.

Video: ImagenSubliminal. imagensubliminal.com
Directed by: Miguel de Guzmán
Assistant: Rocío Romero
Staring: Ismeni Espejel. ismeniespejel.com and Carlos Cañete
Music: “BatLoader” by Fran Prados

The Dwell Vision Award

The Dwell Vision Award celebrates design innovation and skill and will reward 1 winner for their excellence in modern design. Entries must consist of projects completed between 2012 and today that are technically and artistically ground breaking, and that show a new method, material or concept that is pushing modern design forward. Submit a project description or statement between 250-350 words that encapsulates your original design elements and methodology along with 3 or more images. Three finalists will be featured on .com and be flown to New York for an awards celebration where the winner will be announced.

Enter now through August 30, 2013. Read here for more information, including rules and how to enter.