David Basulto

Graduate Architect. Co Founder and Executive Editor of ArchDaily.com. Architecture geek.

Video: Nicanor Parra Library / Mathias Klotz, by Cristobal Palma

Architectural photographer Cristobal Palma shared with us his latest video: The Nicanor Parra Library by Chilean architect Mathias Klotz. This new building will serve as the main library for the Diego Portales University, designed as a state of the art green facility awarded with the Green Good Design 2010 award.

This video is part of a series of recent productions by Cristobal Palma, a dynamic way to see the buildings in detail and while in use. You can see other videos by Palma previously featured at AD:

Based in Santiago, , Cristobal’s work spans architecture, urban and documentary photography. He studied at London’s Architectural Association School of Architecture (AA), and his work has been published in numerous titles internationally, with recent commissions by: The New York Times, Monocle, Wallpaper, Domus, Dwell and Architectural Digest. He lives in Santiago, , and works both with architects in and abroad.

AD Interviews: Meinhard von Gerkan, gmp architekten

We recently had the opportunity to interview gmp architekten founding partner, .  Born in 1935 in Riga/Latvia, Gerkan completed his architectural studies in 1964 at the Carolo Wilhelmina Technical University in Braunschweig.  In 1965 he co-founded with Volkwin Marg, von Gerkan, Marg and partners.  They have completed together over 260 buildings, among them the Berlin-Tegel Airport (competition, 1st place 1965, built in 1970-75), the Berlin Central Station, Villa Guna, Christ Pavilion, and the Lingang New City, been recognized nationally and internationally for their designs and competition proposals.

Meinhard von Gerkan has also dedicated time to architectural education serving as a professor at multiple institutions including Hamburg’s Free Academy of Arts and Japan’s Nihon University in Tokyo.  His interest in the training of architects resulted in the creation of a foundation to promote architectural training in 2007: the Academy for Architectural Culture. He has regarded this as one of his most important projects.

“The architect has a particular social responsibility since architecture is an art with social obligation and use.”

Our profession has a big component of passion, and Meinhard was full of it. It was inspiring to interview him, and I hope you enjoy this video.

A list of projects featured on ArchDaily include:

AD On The Streets: The Highline, New York


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This week AD On The Streets takes you deeper into the project, thanks to a new set of destinations announced by Google a couple of days ago, which includes some of the world’s greatest urban parks.

By using trikes, Google has been able to capture one of the most acclaimed urban projects of the last years: The Highline park in New York, by James Corner Field Operations with Diller Scofidio + Renfro.

This project has been the igniter of a larger scale urban renovation in Manhattan, benefiting not only the neighbors, and local store owners, but also the real state sector and tourism. It’s like the Guggenheim Bilbao effect, now cities wants their own “highlines”.

Part Two of The Highline was opened this summer, and Part Three has just been announced (more on that on another post in a few).

Video: OMA Show & Tell at the Barbican

Yesterday, the Barbican Gallery in London hosted an interesting event with OMA.

Show & Tell” features all the of the firm’s partners, Victor van der Chijs, Reinier de Graaf, Ellen van Loon, Shohei Shigematsu (watch our interview with Shohei), Iyad Alsaka and David Gianotten.

The discussion was chaired by Chris Dercon, director of the Tate Modern, who makes a very good intro to this “historic evening“, in which the partners for the first time will discuss together how the creative practice has worked in the past and how it will work in the future. It includes questions from the 300 members of OMA.

It is interesting to see how the partnership works, and Dercon encourages the young architects in the audience to learn from it and speak to their CEOs to run their firms according to their views after this lecture.

AD on The Streets: M2 Building by Kengo Kuma


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This week AD On The Streets takes you to the architecturally dense city of Tokyo, Japan to visit M2, the first major commission of japanese renowned architect Kengo Kuma.

The 4,482.15sqm building was completed in 1991, and it was designed as Matsuda’s (Mazda) car salesroom. It now operates as a funeral hall. More images available on Flickr. Post modernism to the max.

© Kengo Kuma Architects

Video: Architecture and Business

Jenn Kennedy, author of Success by Design and AD collaborator, shared with us this interesting video in which she asked an influential group of architects about their direction. These testimonials by Dan Meis, Art Gensler, Lauren Rottet and Steven Ehrlich give us valuable insights on running a successful firm.

AD on the Streets: Basel


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Google Street View is an amazing technology that allows us to navigate our built environment. Google has been using cars, tricycles and even snow bikes, loaded with cameras and a GPS system to map the world from a pedestrian perspective.

Every week we are going to take you into an interesting architectural location using Google Street View, to expand the way we show you architecture. Please note that you can drag and walk around the buildings to see them fron different angles.

In this first post we are taking you to an interesting housing project I stumbled upon while walking in Basel, Switzerland. I don’t know who the architect is, but I really liked the way the balconies are arranged in that random facade.

Feel free to leave your comments, feedback or suggested locations in the comments section below.

A tribute to Steve Jobs, by Lord Norman Foster

Campus © Foster + Partners

Today Lord Norman Foster issued a tribute to Steve Jobs (1955-2011), who passed away yesterday at the age of 56. Foster + Partners is working on the new Apple Campus in Cupertino, scheduled to be completed in 2015.

With my colleagues I would like to pay tribute to . Like so many millions our lives have been profoundly and positively influenced by the innovations pioneered by Steve and Apple, names which are inseparable.

We were greatly privileged to know Steve as a person, as a friend and in every way so much more than a client. Steve was an inspiration and a role model. He encouraged us to develop new ways of looking at design to reflect his unique ability to weave backwards and forwards between grand strategy and the minutiae of the tiniest of internal fittings. For him no detail was small in its significance and he would be simultaneously questioning the headlines of our project together whilst he delved into its fine print.

He was the ultimate perfectionist and demanded of himself as he demanded of others. We are better as individuals and certainly wiser as architects through the experience of the last two years and more of working for him. His participation was so intense and creative that our memory will be that of working with one of the truly great designers and mentors.

- Norman Foster Architect Chairman + Founder of Foster + Partners

AD Interviews: Steven Holl

A few months ago I had the chance to meet , whose work I admire. I think that he has been able to innovate and challenge programs as we used to know them, and experiment with materials and structures, while sticking to what really matters in architecture: space, context and light.

When I attended his “Disobedience” lecture in Columbia (during Kenneth Frampton’s 80th birthday) I  understood how this disobedience is tied to his constant investigations, and then reflected on his buildings (like the competition for the Nelson Atkins museum as he tells on the video). I also really liked the fact that he’s very down to earth, and how he started his career and moved to the east coast. If you ever had the chance to attend one of his lectures, don’t miss it!

Steven Holl along with partner Chris McVoy lead Steven Holl Architects, one of the more innovative architecture and urban design offices in the world. A graduate of the University of Washington, Holl also studied in Rome and London before heading to New York to establish an architecture practice.

Holl has also contributed to the profession as an educator; the architect and watercolorist has taught at Columbia University since 1981, where he is a tenured faculty member. He is an Honorary Fellow of the Royal Institute of British Architects, and the recipient of the New York American Institute of Architects Medal of Honor and the prestigious Alvar Aalto Medal.

’ has been recognized internationally by some of architecture’s most prestigious awards. Recent recognition for SHA work includes 2010 P/A Award for LM Harbor Gateway and the 2009 CTBUH Best Tall Building Overall for Linked Hybrid. Their numerous AIA awards include the AIA 2008 Institute Honor Award as well as a Leaf New Built Award 2007 for the Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art in Kansas City; the AIA 2007 Institute Honor Award, AIA New York Chapter 2007 Merit Architecture Award, and a RIBA International Award for the School of Art & Art History at the University of Iowa. And the New Residence at the Swiss Embassy in Washington, D.C was awarded an AIA New York Chapter 2007 Honor Architecture Award and the RIBA International Award.

Steven Holl is also present in the social web via their Facebook page and @stevenhollarch on Twitter.

SHA’s completed works featured on ArchDaily:

In Progress:

Video credits: J.P. Barrera Faus (Editing), J.C. Labarca (Camera).

Farewell Steve Jobs

photo via

A few hours ago one of the most influential figures in computing, product design, and in a way architecture, passed away.

Back in the 70s and 80s played a key role in personal computing as the founder of Apple, bringing technology to the masses. I won’t go into details here, as I think that this ad featured on the Wall Street Journal back in 1981 pretty much explains it: “Putting real computer power in the hands of the individual is already improving the way people work, think, learn and communicate and spend their leisure hours”. I knew about his death via a notification on my iPhone, and I’m writing this on my iPad. None of these devices are what we define as “computers”, none of them are wired to what we call a “local network”.

As for product design, the “i” factor is pretty well known, and has been recognized by design masters such as Dieter Rams. In this field, his legacy will last forever.

“In most people’s vocabularies, design means veneer. It’s interior decorating. It’s the fabric of the curtains of the sofa. But to me, nothing could be further from the meaning of design. Design is the fundamental soul of a human-made creation that ends up expressing itself in successive outer layers of the product or service. When you’re a carpenter making a beautiful chest of drawers, you’re not going to use a piece of plywood on the back, even though it faces the wall and nobody will ever see it. You’ll know it’s there, so you’re going to use a beautiful piece of wood on the back. For you to sleep well at night, the aesthetic, the quality, has to be carried all the way through.” — Steve Jobs

Apple Shanghai Store, © Roy Zipstein

But back to our field, Steve Jobs was a patron of architecture. Jobs worked with Bohlin Cywinski Jackson, one of the most renowned US architecture firms, to develop state of the art retail stores across the world. In these iconic projects they took glass, one of the most essential materials in architecture, to the next level.

AD Interviews: Steven Holl, Museum of Ocean and Surf

A preview of the interview we did with . In this part he describes the recently opened Museum of Ocean and Surf in Biarritz, France.

The design by Steven Holl Architects in collaboration with Solange Fabiao is the winning scheme from an international competition that included the offices of Enric Miralles/Benedetta TagliabueBrochet Lajus PueyoBernard Tschumi and Jean-Michel Willmotte.

Stay tuned for the full interview!

Photos by FG+SG Fernando Guerra and Sergio Guerra.

“When Blogs Plagiarize”: A message to our readers

Dear readers,

First of all, I’m sorry about my delay on sending you this update. For the last few weeks I’ve been on multiple planes traveling around the world, connecting with and interviewing architects in an attempt to give you, our readers, all of the latest projects and insights in the architecture world. From San Francisco to , , London and Basel, in just a few days.

On September 18th, we featured a story titled “Harlem’s New Renaissance”. The article was taken from Jenna McKnight’s article “Harlem’s New Renaissance” featured on Arch Record on August 25th. ArchDaily’s article written by Irina Vinnitskaya took the ideas proposed by Jenna and several of the quotes and information she used, accompanied by a link back to Architectural Record and photography credits, but failed to properly credit the person who came up with the original story idea, Jenna McKnight. Our mistake, a big one.

When Jenna noticed this (as Arch Record constantly reviews our content to syndicate it on their website and on their daily newsletter) she was very upset and contacted me immediately, but given my low email access due to travelling I saw the note a few hours later rather than instantaneously. Immediately upon receiving the email and noticing the improper crediting, I took down the article redirecting it back to Arch Record. In the meanwhile, Jenna posted a story on Arch Record stating that we plagiarized her story with all the given facts.

I reached out to Jenna, told her that there had been no bad intentions and gave her my apologizes as ArchDaily’s editor in chief and assumed my responsibility. Jenna replied, and she was ok with my apologies.

After that, a few blogs picked up on Jenna’s blog post and called this a “blog wars”, trying to add more fuel to the fire. Sadly none of them even asked us our side of the story, except for Sydney at StinkyJournalism.

Our mission at ArchDaily is to provide knowledge to architects around the world, and we will continue bringing you our highest quality of original content, along with information from other respected and useful sources we think will add value to our readers, always sticking to the best practices of fair use.

I hope that this doesn’t affect our relation with Arch Record, as we are both voices of the architecture world. As I mentioned before, Arch Record syndicates our content on their site and includes links on their newsletter (pointing to their site, not ours) citing ArchDaily as the source (but not crediting the specific author, failing to provide a byline). They stopped doing this as of last week.

Dear readers, our commitment is to every architect around the world. Rest assured that the passionate team of architects here at ArchDaily will do their best efforts to keep serving you, as you continue improving our world’s built environment.

- David Basulto

AD Interviews: Peter Eisenman

Yesterday we showed you a preview, and here it is the full interview with one of the most influential contemporary architects.

Architect, educator, and theorist, internationally recognized Peter Eisenman was a part of an important generation of architects and popularized amongst the general public when he was exhibited at the MoMA in 1969 as one of the Five. Eisenman, along with Michael Graves, Charles Gwathmey, John Hejduk, and Richard Meier (Eisenman’s second cousin) made up the ‘group of architects whose work, represented a return to the formalism of early modern rationalist architecture’.

Eisenman earned a Bachelor of Architecture degree from Cornell University, a Master of Science in Architecture degree from Columbia University, and M.A. and Ph.D. degrees from Cambridge University (U.K). He founded an international think tank for architecture, the Institute for Architecture and Urban Studies (IAUS), serving as director until 1982 and simultaneously established his own architecture firm.

As an educator, Eisenman has taught at some of the most prestigious architecture programs including the Yale School of Architecture, Cambridge, Princeton, Harvard, and Ohio State universities.

’s work ranges from large-scale housing and urban design to educational institutions and private houses.  Often labeled as a deconstructivist Eisenman is also known for his intricate drawings.  He has been recognized for his design abilities receiving the Medal of Honor from the New York chapter of the American Institute of Architects in 2001, the Smithsonian Institution’s 2001 Cooper-Hewitt National Design Award in Architecture, and he was also awarded the Golden Lion for Lifetime Achievement at the 2004 Venice Architecture Biennale.

In 2006 Eisenman’s design for the University of Phoenix Stadium for the Arizona Cardinals earned him the label as one of the top five innovators of 2006 according to Popular Science.

Eisenman’s most recent book Ten Canonical Buildings: 1950-2000 revisits some of the most important buildings of the past century with a critical view, a must read for every architect.

Projects by Eisenman previously featured at ArchDaily:

Peter Eisenman: American Architecture Today

is one of the most influential figures in contemporary architecture. Theorist, academic and practitioner, was part of a very important generation of architects and one of the New York Five.

In his recent book Ten Canonical Buildings: 1950-2000 Eisenman revisits some of the most important buildings of the past century with a critical view, a book that is in my opinion a must read for every architect.

During the interview Peter talks about the practice/project of architecture, his views on running an architecture practice, and the current state of American architecture, among other relevant topics. On this preview you can see his views on today’s American Architecture.

Full interview tomorrow!

AIA Arkansas 2011 Convention

Ruth Lilly Visitors Pavilion, Honor Award - photo © Timothy Hursley

Last week I had the honor to be an invited speaker to the 2011 AIA Arkansas Convention in Hot Springs, AR.

The event featured a great group of speakers such as Hicks Stones (Stone Architecture), Rand Elliott (FAIA, Elliott + Associates Architects), Maitland Jones (Deborah Berke & Partners Architects), Steve Dumez (FAIA, Eskew + Dumez + Ripple), David Miller (FAIA, Miller/Hull Partnership), Matthew Kreilich (Julie Snow Architects, Inc.), Kevin Alter (Alter Studio) and Tim Hursley (Architecture photographer).

During the convention I had the opportunity to meet a wide group of local architects, such as renowned architect Marlon Blackwell, Chris Baribeau from Modus Studio (recipient of the 2011 Emerging Professional Award), among other local architects. I had also the opportunity to visit the Anthony Chapelby Maurice Jennings + David McKee Architects (Maurice Jennings was partner of E. Fay Jones for 25 years), an incredible piece of architecture.

Awards during the convention include local architect Charles Witsell, Jr (FAIA, founding partner and senior, Witsell, Evans & Rasco, Architects/Planners), recipient of the Fay Jones Gold Medal Award, and the Chapter of the USGBC, recipient of the Award of Merit.

The 2011 Design Awards, announced last Friday, are a good snapshot of the current state of architecture in the southern state.

After the break, the list of the awarded projects. Some of them are already featured in AD, the rest will be here soon!

In Progress: One World Trade Center / SOM


© Paul Clemence

Architecture photographer Paul Clemence shared with us a recent photo set of the current status of the One World Trade Center building by SOM.

I was downtown today, checking  out the commotion by Ground Zero and snapped these images of the Freedom Tower. Is for sure going up and we can already glance at its connection to neighborhood buildings, its presence on the skyline and some interesting architectural nuances.

- Paul Clemence

More photos after the break.

Le Corbusier meets Albert Einstein

Le Corbusier and Albert Einstein (1946)

Two of the brightest minds from the past century.

Back in 1946, Le Corbusier meet Albert Einstein at Princeton after traveling to to present at the United Nations his project for the UN Headquarters.

I had the pleasure of discussing the “Modulor” at some length with Professor Albert Einstein at Princeton. I was then passing through a period of great uncertainty and stress; I expressed myself badly, I explained the “Modulor” badly, I got bogged down in the morass of “cause and effect”… At one point, Einstein took a pencil and began to calculate. Stupidly, I interrupted him, the conversation turned to other things, the calculation remained unfinished. The friend who had brought me was in the depths of despair. In a letter written to me the same evening, Einstein had the kindness to say this of the “Modulor”: “It is a scale of proportions which makes the bad difficult and the good easy.” There are some who think this judgement is unscientific. For my part, I think it is extraordinarily clear-sighted. It is a gesture of friendship made by a great scientist towards us who are not scientists but soldiers on the field of battle. The scientist tells us: “This weapon shoots straight: in the matter of dimensioning, i.e. of proportions, it makes tour task more certain.”

- Le Corbusier, The Modulor (1954)

Via Awesome People Hanging Together.

Video: Rem Koolhaas and Peter Eisenman on today’s critical architectural discourse issues

Rem Koolhaas and Peter Eisenman, two of the most influential architects these days, discussing the current the issues which, for them, represent the most critical in architectural discourse today.

Both figures present ideas partly against the backdrop of their architecture, and conclude with a shared conversation chaired by CCA Founding Director Phyllis Lambert.

This event took place in June 2007 at the Center for Canadian Architecture, but as you will see the subjects in discussion are more present than ever.

OMA warmly thanks the CCA for sharing this film.