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Strook Creates Colorful Street Murals with Recycled Wood

Discarded planks, doors, floorboards and furniture become colorful geometric faces in Stefaan De Croock’s street murals in Belgium. De Croock (also known as Strook), preserves the color and texture of the scavenged wooden pieces, cutting them into geometric shapes and piecing them together to form colossal faces. 

"The whole process of making such a recycled artwork is really interesting; the search for wood, cutting and making the pieces, placing and building it,” Strook said. “I really like working with the old patina of discarded wood. It’s like a footprint of time; every piece has it own story and comes together in a new composition and forms a new story.”

View photos and learn more about two of his recent projects – Elsewhere and Wood & paint – after the break.

Elsewhere. Image © www.strook.eu Wood & Paint. Image © www.strook.eu Wood & Paint. Image © www.strook.eu Wood & Paint. Image © www.strook.eu

UNStudio's Ben van Berkel on Designing High-Rise for Central London

In the latest episode of Monocle's Section D, Josh Fehnert talks to Ben van Berkel, co-founder and principal of Amsterdam-based UNStudio, about London's new Caneletto residential tower. The office, which was founded in 1988, has completed projects around the world ranging from Rotterdam’s Erasmus Bridge to the Mercedes-Benz Museumin Stuttgart. With over 81 built projects, and 54 currently in progress (including Raffles City in Hangzhou and Scotts Tower in Singapore), London’s Canaletto Tower (which is due to be completed in 2015) marks the practice’s first major project in the UK. The tower, located at the confluence of two London districts — Islington and Shoreditch — marks a significant moment for the Dutch practice's œuvre.

ODA Unveils Plans for Brooklyn Bridge Park Residential Towers

Details have been released on a new residential project designed by ODA Architecture at Brooklyn Bridge Park in New York. Occupying two waterfront sites in the Pier 6 uplands development area, the project will include two10,000-square-foot buildings focused on affordable housing, community development and preserving the surrounding parkland.

Paris Approves Plans to Build Herzog & de Meuron's "Triangle Tower"

Paris has approved its first tower in over 40 years; the city council has agreed to move forward with Herzog & de Meuron's 180-meter-tall "Triangle Tower" - or "Tour Triangle" - after initially rejecting the proposal last year. The controversial plans have been the center of an intense debate since its unveiling in 2008 on whether or not Paris should preserve its 19-century skyline. 

As Gizmodo reports, the Swiss architects sold the tower to the city by claiming its glass facade will "disappear" into the skyline.

“Almost everything the architects say has one message: This building is invisible,” as Foreign Policy pointed out last year. “As if to reinforce this strange duality, the renderings omit Paris’s one true existing skyscraper: the wildly unpopular Tour Montparnasse, built in 1973.”

Daniel Libeskind to be CNN Style's First Guest Editor

Daniel Libeskind will be joining CNN for a month-long editorship that will explore the "interplay between architecture and emotion." As CNN reports, CNN Style is a "new international destination for cosmopolitan, global audiences" that will kickstart with Libeskind's architecture series this July.

How Newlight Technologies Creates a Plastic From Air and Greenhouse Gases

The 20th century was an era of unbelievable change, with more revolutionary ideas and scientific developments than perhaps any era before it. But among the many developments in the material sciences, one stands as perhaps the most revolutionary: plastics. An experimental group of materials at the turn of the century, artificial plastics are so ubiquitous now that it's almost impossible to imagine life without them.

However, in the 21st century plastics have gained a bad reputation; commonly produced from oil, plastics are a non-renewable resource and, after spending decades or even centuries polluting our environment, most plastics will eventually degrade to release their carbon into the atmosphere. Recycling plastic will go some way to slow this problem, but with so many modern products relying on plastic - and our tendency toward increasing consumption showing no signs of slowing - recycling can only do so much.

But what if there was a way to use plastics to actually reverse the release of greenhouse gases? That's exactly what Newlight Technologies is attempting to do with their carbon-negative plastic, AirCarbon.

Studio 015 Paola Viganò Wins Competition to Masterplan Rome's Progetto Flaminio District

CDP Investimenti has selected Studio 015 Paola Viganò as the winner of the Progetto Flaminio International Design Competition to master plan a new district surrounding the City of Science in Rome. After launching the competition in December 2014, CDP Investimenti Sgr and the Municipal Government received over 240 entries. Of those, six teams were shortlisted and given 24,000 euros each to develop and submit their final proposals. Learn more about the winning proposal after the break.

RIBA Future Trends Survey Remains Consistent and Optimistic

The Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA)’s Future Trends Survey for May 2015 continues to show widespread consistency in comparison to March and April, with the workload index remaining "remaining virtually unchanged" at +37 from +36 last month. The private housing sector, which remained strong last month, fell slightly to +34 from +38 while the public sector moved into negative territory for the first time since July 2014. The RIBA claim that "respondents anticipate public sector spending on building projects to be flat at best over the coming quarter." However, the forecasts for the commercial sector rose to +21 from +15 last month, and the community sector forecast "made a recovery from its recent decline" rising to +4 from -3 in April.

BIG Office Building to Break Ground at Philadelphia's Navy Yard

Construction is slated to begin next week on a $35 million office building designed by BIG at Philadelphia's Navy Yard. As the Philadelphia Inquirer reports, Liberty Property Trust will break ground Tuesday on the 94,000-square-foot office building at a site adjacent to a five-acre park designed by James Corner Field Operations. The project will be Liberty's fourteenth development at Navy Yards - a 1200-acre office park sited on a World War II Navy shipyard. 

BIG Designs New Tower for Frankfurt

BIG has been selected through a competition to realize a 185-meter-tall, mixed-use tower in Frankfurt. With a shape that is "both rational and sculptural," the skyscraper is organized as a basic volume whose floor plates "shift" to provide the "best spaces for each specific program."

"Organized as a slender and rational stack of inhabited floors, the tower is interrupted by two sculptural moves where the program changes," says BIG.

Video: Dan Stubbergaard Explores Architecture's Social Impact through Time and Context

"The role of public buildings should be the first to show quality, sustainability, and an embrace of the people," says Copenhagen native and architect, Dan Stubbergaard, in this recent video from the Louisiana Channel. In COBE: Monuments of the FutureStubbergaard speaks in favor of architecture that reinforces the welfare state, beginning with the philosophy behind the process: "Our buildings are like a hard disk of our memory or history" says Stubbergaard, "and you can see that this was the best you could do at that time." 

Founder and creative director of COBE in Copenhagen, Stubbergaard focuses his practice on work varying from public space to large urban planning. Stubbergaard explains how architecture can be a way to understand how cities grow, live, break down and grow again. It is the architecture, the buildings and structure that direct people to the most popular cities, as it is "embedded into the history."

New York's Lowline Launch Campaign to Develop the World's First Subterranean Park

The New York Lowline, a project which was first announced in 2011 and was rekindled last year, have now launched a Kickstarter campaign in order to make their dream of using solar technology to "transform an historic trolley terminal into the world's first underground park" closer to a reality. Their proposal, which seeks to unlock the potential of underused subterranean urban spaces, would see the creation of a living, green public space built beneath the streets of New York City. They are currently seeking funding to build a long-term solar device testing laboratory and public exhibition in order to test and present their designs.

via Kickstarter via Kickstarter via Kickstarter via Kickstarter

Foster + Partners Win Competition to Design Cardiff Interchange

Foster + Partners has won the competition to design Cardiff Interchange, the city’s central bus station. Part of the wider Central Square regeneration masterplan for the area, also by Foster + Partners, the interchange is being relocated closer to the Cardiff Central train station in an effort to allow greater integration of all transportation networks and accommodate future growth in passenger traffic.

Populous Creates Eames-Inspired Installation for World Architecture Festival London

Taking inspiration from Charles and Ray EamesHouse of Cards, London-based practice Populous have developed an installation for the inaugural World Architecture Festival (WAF) exhibition. Built from "hundreds of super-sized multiples of a single ‘W' form, the dramatic seven metre high installation forms the centrepiece" of an exhibition which seeks to showcase "the very best in world architecture." This year, 350 projects have been shortlisted from some the world’s best architects and designers.

© Hufton + Crow © Hufton + Crow © Hufton + Crow © Hufton + Crow

Travel Through 115 Years of U.S. Residential Architecture in this Interactive Infographic by iMove

Moving specialists iMove have created 115 Years of American Homes, a Scrolling Parallax Infographic in which viewers can “drive” through a neighborhood of single-family homes that reflect the style of their respective decades. For each home, graphics detail “tell-tale architectural features, design trends, average home price, and the historical and cultural context” of each decade from the 1900s through the present. Test out the interactive timeline here, and let us know: which decade of residential architecture is your favorite?

“The Architectural Imagination” Selected as Theme of U.S. Pavilion at the 2016 Venice Biennale

After an open competition and recommendations from the Federal Advisory Committee on International Exhibitions, the U.S. Department of State has selected Taubman College of Architecture and Urban Planning at the University of Michigan to organize the U.S. Pavilion at the 2016 Venice Biennale. Their exhibition, “The Architectural Imagination,” will be curated by Cynthia Davidson, executive director of Anyone Corporation and editor of international architecture journal, Log; and Monica Ponce de Leon, dean of the Taubman College of Architecture and Urban Planning and Principal of MPdL studio.

Could Hovering Buildings be the Future of Sustainability?

Could Hovering Buildings be the Future of Sustainability?

If Arx Pax, a cutting-edge technology firm led by Greg and Jill Henderson, has its way, levitating objects could become a common sight. The team is developing what they call Magnetic Field Architecture (MFA), a technology which controls electromagnetic energy to make objects hover, and at the several months ago, they used it to produce Hendo Hover, a hoverboard capable of carrying a person. While the fact that Arx Pax was able to produce a hoverboard is fascinating, the technology could have much more serious applications: as an architect, Greg Henderson envisions that one day MFA technology could be used in buildings to produce sustainable structures which can better survive earthquakes and other natural disasters. Is this goal realistic?

Alban Guého Creates "Flood" Installation for Paris' Nuit Blanche 2015

Architect Alban Guého's “Flood” installation for Paris' 2015 Nuit Blanche arts festival aims to serve as a stark reminder of climate change and the impact humanity has on the world. The 50-square-meter (538 square-foot) installation is composed of weaved filaments that connect the ceiling to the floor. A thick, dark liquid (either oil or black paint) will slowly flow down each string, trickling into a black pool. Flood seeks to address the theme of this year’s Nuit Blanche, which is to echo the issues stemming from COP21, Paris’ Sustainable Innovation Forum.

Detail of Trickling Filament. Image Courtesy of Alban Guého Vector Projection of Flood. Image Courtesy of Alban Guého Parallel Filament. Image Courtesy of Alban Guého Axonometric View of Flood. Image Courtesy of Alban Guého