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C.F. Møller Wins Competition to Masterplan Copenhagen Shoreline

14:00 - 30 March, 2016
C.F. Møller Wins Competition to Masterplan Copenhagen Shoreline, © C.F. Møller Landscape
© C.F. Møller Landscape

C.F. Møller Landscape's Nordhavn Islands project has won the international competition for an innovative learning, activity and water landscape in the harbor basin in front of the new Copenhagen International School in Nordhavn, Copenhagen. The new Nordhavn district is taking shape fast, and, having won the international Nordhavn Islands project competition, C.F. Møller Landscape will now create one of the first and most unique projects in, on and under the water in the quarter.

Australian Exhibition at 2016 Venice Biennale to Reveal "The Pool" as Both Artefact and Catalyst of Change

04:00 - 30 March, 2016
Australian Exhibition at 2016 Venice Biennale to Reveal "The Pool" as Both Artefact and Catalyst of Change, Clovelly Bay enclosure, Clovelly, New South Wales. Image © Abdul Moeez
Clovelly Bay enclosure, Clovelly, New South Wales. Image © Abdul Moeez

Following the announcement that the swimming pool—"one of Australia’s greatest cultural symbols—will form the foundation of the Australian Exhibition at the 2016 Venice Biennale, more information has been revealed about what will be presented.

According to the organisers, "eight prominent cultural leaders from various fields have been selected to share their personal stories, using the device of the pool as a platform to explore the relationship between architecture and Australian cultural identity." These include Olympic swimmers Ian Thorpe and Shane Gould, environmentalist Tim Flannery, fashion designers Romance was Born, authors Christos Tsiolkas and Anna Funder, Indigenous art curator Hetti Perkins and musician Paul Kelly.

Over 30 Countries to Participate in the Inaugural London Design Biennale

14:00 - 29 March, 2016
Over 30 Countries to Participate in the Inaugural London Design Biennale, FREE City, the Mexico proposal. Image © FernandoRomeroEnterprisE
FREE City, the Mexico proposal. Image © FernandoRomeroEnterprisE

A total of 34 countries will participate in the inaugural London Design Biennale, according to a press release from the organization. Set to open on September 7th, the Biennale will center on the theme Utopia by Design, looking at “sustainability, migration, pollution, water and social equality,” among other issues. 

The theme was chosen in honor of the 500th anniversary of the publication of Thomas More’s “Utopia,” and the Biennale will be “the centerpiece” of the Somerset House’s year-long programme celebrating the text. “We chose the inaugural theme, Utopia by Design, to celebrate the 500th anniversary of the publication of  Thomas More’s classic, and to reflect on the rich history of the modernist design it inspired,” said Christopher Turner, the Director of the London Design Biennale. 

The Biennale “will present newly commissioned works in contemporary design, design-led innovation, creativity and research,” bringing together “designers, innovators and cultural bodies” to explore “the role of design in our collective futures.” A diverse group of countries from five continents are set to participate: Albania, Australia, Austria, Bahrain, Belgium, Chile, Croatia, France, Germany, Greece, India, Indonesia, Israel, Italy, Japan, Korea, Lebanon, Mexico, the Netherlands, Nigeria, Norway, Pakistan, Palestine, Poland, Portugal, Russia, Saudi Arabia, SouthAfrica, Sweden, Switzerland, Tunisia, Turkey, UK and the USA.

US installation. Image © CooperHewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum The Cybersyn operations room, inspiration for the Chilean installation. Image © Gui Bonsiepe Aid Drop Yaniv Kadosh_ACT Shenkar, Israel’s proposal. Image © Sasha Flit 'Monstera Deliciosa, Volume I', South Africa proposal. Image © Southern Guild +7

Harvard GSD Shortlists 4 Architects for 2016 Wheelwright Prize

12:00 - 29 March, 2016
Harvard GSD Shortlists 4 Architects for 2016 Wheelwright Prize, The four finalists, clockwise: Samuel Bravo, Matilde Cassani, Pier Paolo Tamburelli and Anna Puigjaner. Image via Wheelwright Prize
The four finalists, clockwise: Samuel Bravo, Matilde Cassani, Pier Paolo Tamburelli and Anna Puigjaner. Image via Wheelwright Prize

Harvard GSD has announced the four shortlisted architects for the 2016 Wheelwright Prize. Awarded annually, the $100,000 grant is for travel-based architectural research. 

Selected from 200 applications from nearly 45 countries worldwide, the four finalists are from Italy, Spain and Chile. Each finalist will present their work and proposal on April 20. This year’s jury includes Eva Franch, Jeannie Kim, Kiel Moe, Rafael Moneo, Benjamin Prosky, Mohsen Mostafavi, and K. Michael Hays.

eVolo Announces 2016 Skyscraper Competition Winners

08:00 - 29 March, 2016
eVolo Announces 2016 Skyscraper Competition Winners, "New York Horizon" /  Yitan Sun and Jianshi Wu. Image Courtesy of eVolo
"New York Horizon" / Yitan Sun and Jianshi Wu. Image Courtesy of eVolo

A competition now in its 11th year, eVolo Magazine has announced the winners of its 2016 Skyscraper Competition: a group of three top prizes and 21 honorable mentions culled from 489 entries. The award annually recognizes the vanguard of high-rise construction "through [the] novel use of technology, materials, programs, aesthetics, and spatial organizations." Among this year's winners are a project that proposes digging down and creating a megastructure along the perimeter of Central Park, a skyscraper that acts as a hub for drones in future commercial applications, and a tower that takes advantage of the climate of Iceland as an ideal location for data servers.

Spotlight: Raymond Hood

07:00 - 29 March, 2016
Spotlight: Raymond Hood, 30 Rockefeller Plaza (formerly the RCA Building), 1933, Rockefeller Center. Image © Flickr User Maciek Lulko licensed under CC BY-NC-ND 2.0
30 Rockefeller Plaza (formerly the RCA Building), 1933, Rockefeller Center. Image © Flickr User Maciek Lulko licensed under CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

In a short but prodigious career Raymond Mathewson Hood (March 29, 1881 – August 14, 1934) had an outsized influence on twentieth century architecture. Born in Pawtucket, Rhode Island, Hood was the son of a box manufacturer in an affluent Baptist family.[1] He attended Brown University before studying at MIT School of Architecture, later graduating from the École des Beaux-Arts in 1911. While in Paris, Hood met John Mead Howells, who in 1922 would select him as a partner for the design of the Chicago Tribune Tower. The team would beat out many more avant-garde entries by the likes of Walter GropiusAdolf Loos, and Eliel Saarinen, with their own Neo-Gothic edifice that mimicked the Butter Tower of Rouen Cathedral.

9 Projects That Feature Eye-Catching Windows

06:00 - 29 March, 2016
9 Projects That Feature Eye-Catching Windows

Some of the most integral parts of a building are related to light and air. Windows, for example, can help transform a project into a more liveable or better space, providing natural light or connecting the building’s users with their surroundings. 

From windows inserted into historic structures, to windows meant to give the building a distinct, landmark look, these nine projects utilize windows as a primary feature. View the nine creative uses of windows after the break.

Territory Without Ground: Designing in the Sahara Desert

04:00 - 29 March, 2016
Territory Without Ground: Designing in the Sahara Desert, © OUALALOU+CHOI
© OUALALOU+CHOI

The Pavilion of Morocco at the 14th Venice Biennale, Fundamentals, focused on territorial speculations in the Sahara: Inhabiting the Uninhabitable. For the exhibition, which was the country's first representation at the Biennale, Paris-based practice OUALALOU+CHOI proposed an urban structure for this desert territory – "a means of putting down roots, implanting urbanity and civilization. The Sahara, with its extreme geography and climatic conditions, remains unexplored territory for architectural speculation."

UNStudio Chosen to Transform Former Deutsche Bank Site in Frankfurt

14:00 - 28 March, 2016
UNStudio Chosen to Transform Former Deutsche Bank Site in Frankfurt, © UNStudio
© UNStudio

UNStudio has won a competition to transform the former Deutsche Bank site in Frankfurt's financial district into a lively mixed-use site comprised of offices, apartments, hotels, retail, gastro and open public spaces. With four high-rise towers reaching up to 228-meters-tall, the proposal plans to feature the city's highest residential and office buildings. 

“Bringing a mixed-use project into this financial district will not only enliven the area during daytime, but it will also introduce evening programs and create an essential form of social sustainability to this part of the city," says Ben van Berkel of UNStudio. "The introduction of the residential and the leisure components are key to this strategy. This sculptural family of towers will also create the suggestion of a cohesive neighborhood within the skyline and emphasize the importance of this part of the city within the whole."

U.S. Bank Stadium: A Game-Changing, Multi-Purpose NFL Stadium

12:00 - 28 March, 2016
U.S. Bank Stadium: A Game-Changing, Multi-Purpose NFL Stadium, Sun on West Glass. Image Courtesy of Minnesota Vikings
Sun on West Glass. Image Courtesy of Minnesota Vikings

Architecture's ability to bring people together is perhaps one of its greatest, awe-inspiring traits. And while the "bringing people together" part is usually meant figuratively, there is no building type quite as marvelous as the stadium, a place that literally gathers tens of thousands of individuals in one place, at the same time. Though the legacy of the stadium as a building type is already rich and storied, a new chapter in the history of American sports architecture will surely begin with the imminent opening of the U.S. Bank Stadium in Minneapolis, Minnesota.

Arndt Schlaudraff's Lego Creations Re-Imagine Renowned Architecture

08:00 - 28 March, 2016
Arndt Schlaudraff's Lego Creations Re-Imagine Renowned Architecture, via Instagram
via Instagram

At last year’s inaugural Chicago Architecture Biennial, one of the celebrated exhibits was Architecture is Everywhere by Sou Fujimoto Architects, in which the firm used everyday items like staples, boxes, potato chips, rocks, and ping pong balls, coupled with scaled human figures to posit new architectural forms. Operating with the philosophy that “architecture is first found and then made,” the project expresses the firm’s belief that we need not look to typical sources for bold thinking on the formal possibilities of architecture.

Building on this philosophy and using only the white-brick Legos from the company’s Studio Architecture kit, Berlin-based artist Arndt Schlaudraff has created a series of constructions that emulate real-world precedents, but lack their materiality and color. The results are sterilized, scaleless forms restricted by the orthogonality of the interlocking brick forms. These stripped Brutalist and Modernist buildings morph into white-washed facsimiles which allow us to see many recognizable projects with a set of fresh eyes. Posting the completed projects on Instagram, Schlaudraff has reimagined icons like the Tate Modern, Alejandro Aravena’s Innovation Center UC, and the Barcelona Pavilion of Ludwig Mies van der Rohe, interspersing them with his own creations and adding another layer of reality distortion to that which is already enabled by the Legos.

One Resident's Argument to Save London's Central Hill Housing Estate

04:30 - 28 March, 2016

London's Central Hill housing estate, located in Brockwell Park (South London) and designed by Edward ('Ted') Hollamby is, like many 1960s schemes of its ilk, under threat of demolition. In this short film by British filmmaker Joe Gilbert, the estate is viewed through the narration of a long-term resident, Clifford Grant, who discusses its history and argues for its future security.

Rock Print: The Remarkable Deinstallation of a Standout Exhibit at the Chicago Architecture Biennial

12:00 - 27 March, 2016

It’s a shame that the inaugural Chicago Architecture Biennial has already come and gone, and that the Windy City will have to wait until next fall for another dose of architectural euphoria. But it’s worth revisiting one of the event’s standout exhibits, an installation equally exemplary for its display as for its expiry. “Rock Print,” created by Gramazio Kohler Research of ETH Zurich and Skylar Tibbits of MIT's Self-Assembly Lab, was a four-legged, neo-primitive tower of stones and string that was erected without mortar or other reinforcement, meaning its disassembly would be the exact inverse action of its construction. The string, laid down by an algorithm, was the binder for stones laid by hand in thin stacks – the team called them “slices” – in what amounted to a type of analog version of 3D printing. The material process has been given the name “reversible concrete” and could be a paradigm shift in construction for its portability and versatility.

In the above video, the deconstruction of “Rock Print” is shown in abridged stages, where the structure’s string is dislodged and returned to a motorized spool on the gallery floor. The small stone fragments spew from the top of the structure like debris from the top of a volcano in the midst of eruption, and all that remains at the end is a small mound of concrete pebbles occupying a large circumference. A structure like “Rock Print” emphasizes that detritus can be avoided by adapting the process of building to vanguard materials that seek to match the brevity of contemporary construction with materials that curtail the waste.

20 Things You Didn't Know About Mies van der Rohe

06:00 - 27 March, 2016
20 Things You Didn't Know About Mies van der Rohe, Philip Johnson, Ludwig Mies van der Rohe, y Phyllis Lambert frente a una imagen de la Torre Seagram, Nueva York, 1955. Impresión, 7½ × 9⅜ in. Fotógrafo desconocido. Fonds Phyllis Lambert, Canadian Centre for Architecture, Montreal. Imagen © United Press International
Philip Johnson, Ludwig Mies van der Rohe, y Phyllis Lambert frente a una imagen de la Torre Seagram, Nueva York, 1955. Impresión, 7½ × 9⅜ in. Fotógrafo desconocido. Fonds Phyllis Lambert, Canadian Centre for Architecture, Montreal. Imagen © United Press International

Today marks 130 years since the birth of German architect Ludwig Mies van der Rohe. In honor of this tremendously influential figure, we're shining some light into the lesser known facts about Mies' life in order to better understand and contextualize his architecture.

For this, our colleagues at ArchDaily en Español have referred to "Vidas construidas, Biografías de arquitectos" (Constructed Lives, Biographies of Architects), a book by Anatxu Zabalbeascoa and Javier Rodríguez Marcos. This text, released by publisher Gustavo Gili, features the biographies of 20 of the world's most celebrated architects, from the Renaissance to the Modern movement. Each story is a fascinating journey into the lives of each architect, and the details allow us to understand the genesis of many works that are today considered classics.

We've chosen 20 facts that reveal the thoughts, influences and decisions that brought Ludwig Mies van der Rohe's architecture to the forefront of modernism.

Melike Altınışık Architects Wins First Mention in Competition for Kızılırmak Bridge in Turkey

14:00 - 26 March, 2016
Melike Altınışık Architects Wins First Mention in Competition for Kızılırmak Bridge in Turkey, Courtesy of Melike Altınışık Architects
Courtesy of Melike Altınışık Architects

Melike Altınışık Architects has won first mention in a competition to design the Kızılırmak Bridge located in Sivas, Turkey. The competition, which was hosted by Sivas Municipality, called for ideas to design a bridge to support pedestrian movement, vehicular transportation, and cycling activities. The proposal aimed to create an “avant-garde looking design approach to obtain coherency between plan and sections, and harmonize the bridge with its topography.”

Exhibition at 2016 Venice Biennale to Highlight Scotland’s Position as an Emerging Northern Economic Area

09:30 - 26 March, 2016
© Lateral North
© Lateral North

Scotland, a country within the United Kingdom, will be showcasing a projected entitled Prospect North at the forthcoming Venice Biennale. Curated collaboratively between the Scottish Government, Architecture and Design Scotland, Creative Scotland,and the British Council Scotland, the installation will be designed by Lateral North, Dualchas Architects, and Soluis. As reported by the Architects' Journal, the show is set to examine "Scotland’s relationship with its northern neighbours" by focusing "on people and place, [and] looking at how communities from the Northern Isles of Orkney to the central belt of Scotland are using grassroot action."

Tintagel Castle Bridge Competition Won by Ney & Partners and William Matthews Associates

14:00 - 25 March, 2016
Tintagel Castle Bridge Competition Won by Ney & Partners and William Matthews Associates, Proposal: Ney & Partners Civil Engineers with William Matthews Associates, Ettwein Bridges, Waagner Biro, Ramboll and Jackson Coles LLP.. Image © MRC/Emily Whitfield-Wicks
Proposal: Ney & Partners Civil Engineers with William Matthews Associates, Ettwein Bridges, Waagner Biro, Ramboll and Jackson Coles LLP.. Image © MRC/Emily Whitfield-Wicks

English Heritage has announced that a team of Ney & Partners and UK-based William Matthews Associates has won the Tintagel Castle Bridge Design Competition. Chosen from a shortlist of 6 proposals, from among 136 entries, the winning design was selected by the majority of the jury. 

The site of Tintagel Castle is one of English Heritage’s most spectacular, attracting over 200,000 visitors annually. It is “inextricably linked to the legend of King Arthur and has been prized throughout history for its elemental qualities and spirit of place within this area of outstanding natural beauty.” The new bridge is commissioned for approximately £4 million and will stand 28m higher than the current crossing.

Aquarium of the Pacific Reveals New Design for Major Expansion

12:00 - 25 March, 2016
Aquarium of the Pacific Reveals New Design for Major Expansion, Courtesy of EHDD
Courtesy of EHDD

San Francisco-based architecture firm, EHDD, has just unveiled their design for Pacific Visions, a 29,000 square foot, two-story expansion for one of the nation’s largest aquariums, the Aquarium of the Pacific. Pacific Visions' facilities will integrate the arts and research sciences which will allow visitors to understand the world’s oceans. The expansion is scheduled to open in the fall of 2018.

The Best Submissions to Our Easter Egg Design Contest

07:15 - 25 March, 2016
The Best Submissions to Our Easter Egg Design Contest, Submitted by Eduardo Guerra
Submitted by Eduardo Guerra

We provided our readers with a blank canvas, a single white egg. From this common starting point, we asked architects to let their innovation and creativity shine by putting an architectural twist on the average pastel Easter egg. From gifs to famous architects as eggs, we received over 450 submissions to our sites in English, Spanish, Chinese and Portuguese. It was particularly difficult to narrow down our favorites, and our selection really only scratches the surface of the many creative Easter eggs that we received from our incredibly talented readers. 

9 Architectural Photography Tutorials to Help You Get the Right Shot

06:00 - 25 March, 2016
9 Architectural Photography Tutorials to Help You Get the Right Shot, © Flickr user zachinglis licensed under CC BY-NC 2.0
© Flickr user zachinglis licensed under CC BY-NC 2.0

While drawing or even writing about architecture can be a great way to be expressive in the field, today architectural photography is by far the most direct and widely-used methods for communicating the true form of the built environment. Capturing the perfect architectural photograph, however, can be far more difficult than one might anticipate. In light of this, we have compiled a list of ten architectural photography tutorials to help you get the right shot every time.

Read on to see how to take architectural photos at twilight, for Instagram, using long exposure, and more.

Brâncuși-Inspired 295 King Street Wins Approval in Melbourne

16:00 - 24 March, 2016
Brâncuși-Inspired 295 King Street Wins Approval in Melbourne , Courtesy of Plus Architecture
Courtesy of Plus Architecture

295 King Street, a 64-story mixed-use building designed by Plus Architecture and developed by Farinia, has just won approval to be built in Melbourne, Australia. The project, situated in the city’s central business district, is comprised of two sites at the northwest corner of King and Little Lonsdale streets. Its sculptural design will become a notable presence in the Melbourne skyline. Upon completion, the building will include 431 apartments and nine penthouses.

Olson Kundig Take Home Top Honors in 2016 Fairy Tales Competition

12:00 - 24 March, 2016
Olson Kundig Take Home Top Honors in 2016 Fairy Tales Competition, Olson Kundig. Image Courtesy of Blank Space
Olson Kundig. Image Courtesy of Blank Space

Blank Space has announced three winners and ten honorable mentions in their third Fairy Tales Competition. This year's contest drew entries from more than 1,500 participants from 67 countries. Everyone from students to academics and notable studios and designers submitted detailed stories and beautiful visuals for their submissions. The winners were chosen by an interdisciplinary jury of distinguished judges including Hans-Ulrich Obrist, Co-Director of the Serpentine Galleries; Elizabeth Diller, founding partner at Diller Scofidio + Renfro, and ArchDaily’s own Becky Quintal, Executive Editor; and David Basulto, Founder and Editor in Chief.

Monocle 24 Investigates Gardens and the Public Life of Plants

09:30 - 24 March, 2016
Monocle 24 Investigates Gardens and the Public Life of Plants, Heatherwick Studio's proposed Garden Bridge scheme across the River Thames, London. Image Courtesy of Arup
Heatherwick Studio's proposed Garden Bridge scheme across the River Thames, London. Image Courtesy of Arup

This edition of Section DMonocle 24's weekly review of design, architecture and craft, is dedicated to plants and gardens and specifically their role in architecture, urban life, and the design of the workplace. The episode considers the history of London’s urban greenery and the role of plants in landscape architecture touching upon, in conversation with Sam Jacob, the latest in London's green infrastructure: Heatherwick Studio's proposed Garden Bridge across the River Thames. It also traces the lineage of semi-private squares in Georgian London to Ebenezer Howard's Garden City movement in the late 19th and early 20th centuries – all approaches discussing how best to unite the built environment with the natural world.

Plastic Architecture: 12 Projects that Highlight the Potential of Polymers

17:30 - 23 March, 2016
Plastic Architecture: 12 Projects that Highlight the Potential of Polymers

Over time, an endless spectrum of materials has become available for use within the realm of architecture. However, one material that seems underrepresented is plastic, a versatile and malleable compound that can be used for a wide variety of purposes. In light of the many applications of plastics in architecture, we have compiled a list of 12 projects that utilize plastic: from repurposing plastic bottles to the use of translucent plastic siding, these projects represent just a few of the many ways that plastic can be used as a primary material.