Pavilion Made Out of Recycled Coat Hangers to Be Constructed on Governors Island

12:00 - 30 January, 2016
Hanger Barn. Image Courtesy of FIGMENT
Hanger Barn. Image Courtesy of FIGMENT

A design for a pavilion constructed out of recycled clothes hangers has been selected as the winner of the sixth annual City of Dreams Pavilion Competition. The temporary structure will be built on Governors Island and available to the public for summer 2016, pending final approval and fundraising. 

Hosted by FIGMENT, the Emerging New York Architects Committee (ENYA) of the American Institute of Architects New York Chapter (AIANY), and the Structural Engineers Association of New York (SEAoNY), the competition speculates on possible futures with solutions to the current strain on economic and natural resources. Designers are required to consider their materials from sourcing to disposal, or ideally, reuse, promoting sustainable thinking.

Over 100 design proposals were submitted, and the jury selected four finalists who were each given a month to further develop their designs in response to jury comments. See the winning design and the three finalists after the break.

Work Begins on David Chipperfield's Mughal Museum in India

16:00 - 29 January, 2016
© David Chipperfield Architects
© David Chipperfield Architects

Construction is underway on David Chipperfield Architect's Mughal Museum in Agra, India, near the Taj Mahal's eastern gate. Part of a larger Archohm-led masterplan, which includes the Taj Orientation Center and the Agra Heritage Center, the project will provide 5200-square-meters of permanent and temporary exhibition space entirely "dedicated to the history and culture of the Mughals, a dynasty that ruled over Northern India for over three centuries," says the practice. 

Perkins Eastman Breaks Ground on New Jersey’s Tallest Tower

14:00 - 29 January, 2016
© Perkins Eastman
© Perkins Eastman

99 Hudson Street, soon to be New Jersey's tallest tower, has officially broken ground. Designed by Perkins Eastman, the 900-foot-tall mixed-use condominium tower is said to be one of the tallest residential buildings in the US and will "dramatically remake the Jersey City skyline," according to Mayor Steven Fulop.

“99 Hudson will mark a new milestone for Jersey City’s resurgence as a truly great city in which to live and work. For decades now, people on the west side of the Hudson have marveled at Manhattan’s skyline, but today Jersey City is developing its own dynamic city, along with a world-class skyline. To play a part in this transformation is quite an honor,” said Perkins Eastman principal Ming Wu.

Wolfgang Buttress’ Celebrated UK Pavilion, "The Hive" Moves to Kew Gardens

12:00 - 29 January, 2016
UK Pavilion - Milan Expo 2015 / Wolfgang Buttress. Image Courtesy of Kew
UK Pavilion - Milan Expo 2015 / Wolfgang Buttress. Image Courtesy of Kew

Wolfgang ButtressThe Hive, the gold medal-winning UK Pavilion from Milan Expo 2015, is being relocated to London's famous botanic garden, Kew. The mesmerizing (and photogenic) "beehive" was designed to give visitors a glimpse into the life of a working bee; its 169,300 individual aluminium components, reaching 17-meters and fitted with hundreds of LED lights, created a multi-sensory experience that shed light on the importance of the pollinator.  

"We are truly delighted to announce The Hive's move to Kew, both for its magnificent aesthetic appeal and for the resonance it has with our work – I can think of no better home for this remarkable marriage of architecture and science," Richard Deverell, director of the Kew, told Horticulture Week.

NCARB to Help Retire the Term "Intern" With Newly Named Experience Program

08:00 - 29 January, 2016
Courtesy of millann via shutterstock
Courtesy of millann via shutterstock

As of June 29, 2016, the National Council of Architectural Registration Boards (NCARB)’s Intern Development Program will be renamed the “Architectural Experience Program," or AXP. Part of a wider change in the industry to retire the term “intern,” the decision was made after years of research and outreach by various committees, as well as feedback from “state licensing boards, industry leaders and emerging professionals.”

The program, developed by the NCARB, is meant to guide aspiring architects through their early career, helping them earn their license and practice independently. NCARB will continue referring to those working toward licensure as “aspiring architects” or “exam candidates.”

Kohn Pedersen Fox + Leslie E. Robertson's Next Tokyo 2045 Masterplan Features a Mile-High Skyscraper

06:00 - 29 January, 2016
Courtesy of Kohn Pederson Fox Associates
Courtesy of Kohn Pederson Fox Associates

Kohn Pedersen Fox Associates and Leslie E. Robertson Associates have joined forces to propose a vision for a new city in Tokyo Bay. “Next Tokyo” imagines a mega-city that is adapted to climate change in the year 2045. Rising sea levels, seismic activity, and the threat of typhoons have drawn attention to the vulnerability of low-elevation coastal zones in the bay. This design proposes a development strategy that improves the bay’s preparedness for these natural disasters, while also creating a mile-high residential tower and a new transit-oriented district.

Monocle 24's 'The Urbanist' Examines the Typology of the Department Store

04:00 - 29 January, 2016

For this edition of The UrbanistMonocle 24's weekly "guide to making better cities," the team ask whether the typology of the department store – their urban impact and the ways in which they have redefined the shopping habits of many. The show examines the history of the London department store and heads to Paris to explore France’s first, Le Bon Marché. The team also draw parallels between Istanbul’s old 'hans' and their contemporary equivalents.

Minimalist, Enviable Snap-Together Dog Houses from Bad Marlon

16:00 - 28 January, 2016
Deauville. Image © BAD MARLON via Fast Company
Deauville. Image © BAD MARLON via Fast Company

Your pet's den no longer has to be an eyesore. South Korean brand BAD MARLON has designed a line of modern pet homes that would meet the specs of any architect. The minimalist collection is made up of three dog houses, two of which are assembled magnetically, and one beautifully crafted interlocking pen. Take a look for yourself, after the break. 

Oxford Unveils 5 Proposals Seeking to Overhaul St Hilda's College

12:00 - 28 January, 2016
Tim Ronalds Architects. Image Courtesy of Malcolm Reading Consultants
Tim Ronalds Architects. Image Courtesy of Malcolm Reading Consultants

Oxford University has released five shortlisted proposals to overhaul and extend its St Hilda's College. Part of the invited competition Redefining St Hilda's, the concepts are designed to expand student and Fellow accommodation, while providing new social and teaching spaces, Middle Common Room, Porters' Lodge and entrance for the college. 

“We are keenly aware of the legacy we give to future generations as well as the opportunity to enhance Oxford itself. This initiative is all about reimagining this beautiful site and creating an academic environment which is pleasing and satisfying to use, and which enables the College to flourish over the next hundred years,” says St Hilda’s College Principal, Professor Sir Gordon Duff.

Read on for a glance at the five shortlisted proposals...

Winning Design Selected for the World War I Memorial in DC

10:00 - 28 January, 2016
Courtesy of The World War I Centennial Commission
Courtesy of The World War I Centennial Commission

After announcing five finalists in August of 2015, the World War I Centennial Commission has announced the winner of its National World War I Memorial competition: The Weight of Sacrifice by 25-year-old architect Joe Weishaar and sculptor Sabin Howard. The design focuses on the sacrificial cost of war through relief sculpture, quotations of soldiers, and a freestanding sculpture. Visitors are guided through the memorial’s changing elevations by quotation walls that describe the war from the point of view of generals, politicians, and soldiers.

How University Construction Projects Offer Opportunities to Reform Architecture Education

09:30 - 28 January, 2016
University of Kansas, The Forum at Marvin Hall, 2014. Image © James Ewing Photography
University of Kansas, The Forum at Marvin Hall, 2014. Image © James Ewing Photography

There is a dichotomy to the business of educating architects. While the real world profession is a collaborative field, one in which projects of even the largest and most publicly-acclaimed offices are team-led initiatives, the study of architecture is often insular, myopic, and devoid of such partnerships. Certainly there is a benefit to this style of teaching - it builds confidence for one thing - but it is troubling to think that in a socially-oriented and practically-minded field like architecture, there can be such major disconnects between the process of designing and the act of building. As many critics of current architectural education have pointed out, incorporating design-build projects into school curriculums is a pragmatic solution oriented towards correcting such imbalances.

The fact that more schools don't have programs for students to both design and build their projects is especially perplexing when most universities, particularly those located in the United States, are in such a prolonged period of institutional and budgetary expansion. With many schools now governed like corporate entities, it’s surprising that architecture programs and students are not treated like in-house resources. Why aren’t architecture students treated like assets, the same way that student doctors and nurses are brought into university led medical facilities or scientists into campus research labs?

Munroe Meyer Institute, Exterior Rendering, Design: Brett Virgl, Ruth Barankevich. Image Courtesy of College of Architecture University of Nebraska–Lincoln Munroe Meyer Institute, Exterior Rendering, Design: Lily Cai & Phuong Nguyen. Image Courtesy of College of Architecture University of Nebraska–Lincoln University of Kansas, Ecohawks Research Facility, 2013. Image Courtesy of Studio 804 University of Kansas, Center for Design Research, 2011. Image Courtesy of Studio 804 +32

Five Intervention Strategies for the 2016 Oslo Architecture Triennale Revealed

04:00 - 28 January, 2016
Kirkenes Harbor (2009): one of four 'Intervention Strategy' sites. Image © Mathis Herbert
Kirkenes Harbor (2009): one of four 'Intervention Strategy' sites. Image © Mathis Herbert

Following an international open call for 'Intervention Strategies' which connect and correspond to the 2016 Oslo Architecture Triennale’s theme—After Belongingfive proposals have been selected to be developed as part of its core program, to be displayed and discussed throughout the course of the event. The jury have been "pleased and impressed by the wide range of proposals, their creativity, seriousness and sometimes also the humor with which [the submissions] approach issues of real gravity, and by the care and hard work that was evident in almost all of them."

Zaha Hadid and Martin Knight Compete with Chinese Firms to Design Bridges in Guangzhou

14:00 - 27 January, 2016
© Flickr CC User jo.sau
© Flickr CC User jo.sau

Guangzhou, China's third largest city, is planning to rebuild four bridges in its region - the Renmin, Jiangwan, Haiyin, and Liede Bridges. Three teams have been shortlisted for each bridge, all of which are Chinese practices with the exception of Zaha Hadid Architects, Knight Architects and NEXT Architects. As BDOnline reports, the finalists are expected to propose a range of options, from small upgrades to complete rebuilds. A winner for each will be selected in February, after the Chinese new year. 

The shortlisted practices for each bridge include...

7 Shortlisted for Latvian Museum of Contemporary Art

12:00 - 27 January, 2016
© Latvian Museum of Contemporary Art Foundation
© Latvian Museum of Contemporary Art Foundation

Adjaye, Henning Larsen, and wHY are among seven practices shortlisted in an invited design competition to design the Latvian Museum of Contemporary Art (LMoCA). The new museum, planned for the center of Riga, Latvia, hopes to become "the most visited art museum in the Baltic States,  as well as a cultural arts center of interregional significance." It's collection will feature regional art and visual culture from the 1960s. 

The seven shortlisted teams are...

Spotlight: Félix Candela

10:30 - 27 January, 2016
Los Manantiales. Image via rkett.com
Los Manantiales. Image via rkett.com

Mexican-Spanish architect Félix Candela (Jan 27, 1910-Dec 7, 1997) was known for redefining the role of the architect in relation to structural problems, and played a crucial role in the development of new structural forms of concrete. His famous experimentation with concrete gave rise to projects like the Los Manantiales restaurant in the Xochimilco area of Mexico City and the Cosmic Rays Pavilion for the National Autonomous University of Mexico.

Syrian Artists Build Replicas of Country’s Destroyed Monuments

08:00 - 27 January, 2016
Mahmoud Hariri building a model of Palmyra using clay and wooden kebab skewers. Image Courtesy of UNHCR Tracks
Mahmoud Hariri building a model of Palmyra using clay and wooden kebab skewers. Image Courtesy of UNHCR Tracks

Throughout Syria’s four-year war, many of the country’s ancient monuments and artifacts have been demolished by ISIS and Syrian bombs targeted at Islamic militants. In August, ISIS destroyed Palmyra, one of the most important cultural centers in the world.

Yet a group of Syrian refugee artists in Jordan, with the support of the United Nations and Internal Relief and Development, have been salvaging some memories of their country’s destroyed artifacts. Since November 2014, these artists have been constructing miniature models of Syria’s ancient architecture through a project called Syria History and Civilization, according to a reporty by Buzzfeed News.

Zsolt Hlinka's Urban Symmetry Photographs Reimagine Danube River Architecture

06:00 - 27 January, 2016
© Zsolt Hlinka
© Zsolt Hlinka

Budapest-born printmaker and photographer Zsolt Hlinka has created Urban Symmetry, a Wes Anderson reminiscent photo series depicting perfectly-symmetrical buildings on the banks of the Danube River. Using partial photos of the buildings, Hlinka creates fictitious compositions through reflections, resulting in new personalities and character in the portraits.

Italo Calvino's 'Invisible Cities', Illustrated

04:00 - 27 January, 2016
Zaira. Image © Karina Puente Frantzen
Zaira. Image © Karina Puente Frantzen

Lima-based architect Karina Puente has a personal project: to illustrate each and every "invisible" city from Italo Calvino's 1972 novel. The book, which imagines imaginary conversations between the (real-life) Venetian explorer Marco Polo and the aged Mongol ruler Kublai Khan has been instrumental in framing approaches to urban discourse and the form of the city. According to Puente, who has shared six drawings with ArchDaily, "each illustration has a conceptual process, some of which take more time than others." Usually "I research, think, and ideate over each city for three weeks before making sketches." The final drawings and cut-outs take around a week to produce.