In Celebration of Earth Day, 5 Overviews of Our Planet

09:30 - 22 April, 2016
In Celebration of Earth Day, 5 Overviews of Our Planet, Earth "Overview". Image Courtesy of NASA
Earth "Overview". Image Courtesy of NASA

In celebration of Earth Day, we invited Benjamin Grant—founder of the Daily Overview—to select the five "overviews" which he considers to be among the most inspiring that his platform has shared. The image above, taken on Christmas Eve in 1968 by astronauts of NASA's Apollo 8 mission is, according to Grant, "believed by many to be the first "overview" of our planet, captured by astronaut Bill Anders." This photograph dramatically pulled into focus the simultaneous magnificence, intricacy, and terrifying fragility of the planet we inhabit. Since that moment the advent, acceleration, and accessibility of satellite imagery has made one thing abundantly clear: that humankind has had a considerable effect on Earth, for better or for worse.

Knitknot Architecture Seeks Funds for Nicaraguan School

08:00 - 22 April, 2016

Knitknot Architecture, in collaboration with nonprofit group Seeds of Learning, has designed -- and is raising funds to build -- the El Jicarito School. Located in El Jicarito, a tiny village in Nicaragua, the school will serve 27 children who currently do not have a school to attend.

The low-cost school design aims to bring the community together through collaborative construction methods, the use of local materials, and the creation of a new educational landscape that will enhance creativity.

© knitknot architecture © knitknot architecture © knitknot architecture © knitknot architecture +13

Spotlight: James Stirling

06:00 - 22 April, 2016
Spotlight: James Stirling, Staatsgalerie, Stuttgart, Germany (1977–1984), 1984. Alastair Hunter, photographer. . Image Courtesy of Canadian Centre for Architecture
Staatsgalerie, Stuttgart, Germany (1977–1984), 1984. Alastair Hunter, photographer. . Image Courtesy of Canadian Centre for Architecture

British architect and Pritzker Laureate Sir James Stirling (22 April 1926 – 25 June 1992) grew up in Liverpool, one of the two industrial powerhouses of the British North West, and began his career subverting the compositional and theoretical ideas behind the Modern Movement. Citing a wide-range of influences - from Colin Rowe, a forefather of Contextualism, to Le Corbusier, and from architects of the Italian Renaissance to the Russian Constructivist movement - Stirling forged a unique set of architectural beliefs that manifest themselves in his works. Indeed, his architecture, commonly described as "non-comformist", consistently caused annoyance in conventional circles.

SHoP Wins Landmarks Commission Approval for Brooklyn Supertall

16:30 - 21 April, 2016
SHoP Wins Landmarks Commission Approval for Brooklyn Supertall, via YIMBY
via YIMBY

SHoP has won Landmarks Preservation Commission approval to build Brooklyn’s tallest tower at 340 Flatbush Avenue Extension, reports New York Yimby. Located on the same block of the former Dime Savings Bank, an individual and interior landmark, SHoP’s proposal calls for a 73-story, 1,066 foot-tall mixed-use tower. The proposal required LPC-approval because the architects want to merge the tower’s lobby with the bank and convert the atrium into a new retail component. The site’s relationship to the bank building encouraged the architects to develop a design and material choices that are heavily influenced by the proposed tower’s smaller, but no less grand, neighbor.

March ABI Reflects Increase in US Design Services

14:30 - 21 April, 2016
March ABI Reflects Increase in US Design Services, March ABI 2016. Image via CalculatedRiskBlog.com
March ABI 2016. Image via CalculatedRiskBlog.com

The American Institute of Architects (AIA) reported the March Architecture Billings Index (ABI) score was 51.9, up from the mark of 50.3 in the previous month. This score reflects an increase in design services (any score above 50 indicates an increase in billings). The new projects inquiry index was 58.1, down from a reading of 59.5 the previous month.

A Stretch of Rio de Janeiro's Tim Maia Bike Path Collapses

13:30 - 21 April, 2016
A Stretch of Rio de Janeiro's Tim Maia Bike Path Collapses, Image via Reprodução / Globo News
Image via Reprodução / Globo News

A 50-meter stretch of Rio de Janeiro's Tim Maia bike path, which was built in preparation of the 2016 Olympic Games to connect neighborhoods Leblon and São Conrado, collapsed this morning. Adjacent to the Avenue Oscar Niemeyer, in the south of the city, the bike path was inaugurated on January 17 this year. According to the fire department, the deadly accident was caused by the surf of the sea. 

According to passersby, the bike lane was hit by a strong wave that, in addition to collapsing the site, broke the windshield of a bus and dragged a woman on the boardwalk. The location is near the exit of the sewer pipe.

OMA's Pierre Lassonde Pavilion of the Musée National des Beaux-Arts du Québec to Open in June

12:00 - 21 April, 2016
OMA's Pierre Lassonde Pavilion of the Musée National des Beaux-Arts du Québec to Open in June, Courtesy of OMA, Photograph by Iwan Baan
Courtesy of OMA, Photograph by Iwan Baan

OMA’s Pierre Lassonde Pavilion of the Musée National des Beaux-Arts du Québec (MNBAQ) will open to the public on June 24, 2016. Increasing the museum’s space by 90 percent, the 14,900 square-meter pavilion faces Québec City’s Grande Alléee and seeks to fuse the energy of street life with the idyllic landscapes of the adjacent Parc des Champs-de-Bataille.

Courtesy of OMA, Photograph by Iwan Baan Courtesy of OMA, Photograph by Iwan Baan Courtesy of OMA, Photograph by Iwan Baan Courtesy of OMA, Photograph by Iwan Baan +37

Bjarke Ingels Named One of TIME's 100 Most Influential People

10:35 - 21 April, 2016
Bjarke Ingels Named One of TIME's 100 Most Influential People, © DAC / Jakob Galtt
© DAC / Jakob Galtt

Bjarke Ingels has been named one of TIME's 100 Most Influential People in the magazine's annual list of groundbreakers in five categories: Pioneers, Titans, Artists, Leaders, and Icons. Other giants of the same field endorse the authority of each selected figure and, in Ingels case, former boss Rem Koolhaas offers poignant words of praise. “Bjarke is the first major architect who disconnected the profession completely from angst,” says Koolhaas. “He threw out the ballast and soared. With that, he is completely in tune with the thinkers of Silicon Valley, who want to make the world a better place without the existential hand-wringing that previous generations felt was crucial to earn utopianist credibility.” You can review the full profile and TIME’s complete list of people here.

Marcel Breuer's Central Library in Atlanta Faces Demolition Threat

08:00 - 21 April, 2016
Marcel Breuer's Central Library in Atlanta Faces Demolition Threat, The Atlanta Central Library by Marcel Breuer, currently slated for replacement.. Image via Docomomo
The Atlanta Central Library by Marcel Breuer, currently slated for replacement.. Image via Docomomo

Like many Brutalist buildings in America, the Central Library in Atlanta by Marcel Breuer is facing demolition, reports The Architect's Newspaper. Completed in 1980 with a 300-seat theater, restaurant and 1 million books, the building exemplifies Breuer’s sensibilities, with its bush-hammered concrete panels and Bauhaus-inspired forms. However, over the years the building has fallen into disrepair, with its theater closing in the mid-1990s, and the restaurant closing a few years later. In 2002, the city spent $5 million on restoration. Even so, in 2008, voters approved a $275 million bond referendum, which included a proposal to replace the library by Breuer with another. Despite protests from preservationists, the building’s future is uncertain, with voters clearly calling for a new library building.

Grafton Architects See Off "Stellar Competition" to Design the LSE's New Paul Marshall Building

07:00 - 21 April, 2016
Grafton Architects See Off "Stellar Competition" to Design the LSE's New Paul Marshall Building, Interior Perspective. Image © Grafton Architects
Interior Perspective. Image © Grafton Architects

Dublin-based Grafton Architects, who last year were awarded the Jane Drew Prize, have seen off competition from the likes of Herzog & de Meuron and David Chipperfield Architects to win the contest to design the London School of Economics’ (LSE) £100 million ($144 million) Paul Marshall Building. The new center will house the academic departments of Accounting, Finance and Management and research centres, including the Marshall Institute, with teaching facilities as well as new multipurpose sports and arts facilities. Grafton Architects are reportedly "absolutely delighted to be given this opportunity to build in this unique location in Lincoln's Inn Fields, across from the wonderful Sir John Soane’s Museum, for a visionary client such as LSE."

Renzo Piano and ELEMENTAL Among 8 Finalists in Qatar's Art Mill International Design Competition

19:01 - 20 April, 2016
Renzo Piano and ELEMENTAL Among 8 Finalists in Qatar's Art Mill International Design Competition, © Qatar Museums and Malcolm Reading Consultants
© Qatar Museums and Malcolm Reading Consultants

Qatar Museums has announced a shortlist of eight finalists that will move on to the third and final stage of the Art Mill International Design Competition in Doha. On a site extending into the Arabian Sea that was only recently occupied by Qatar Flour Mills, Art Mill will integrate gallery and exhibition space with facilities for education, events, conservation, art handling, and research. Joining the Museum of Islamic Art designed by I.M. Pei, and the still under-construction National Museum of Qatar, designed by Jean Nouvel, in the words of the competition brief, “Art Mill will and extend and intensify the cultural quarter being developed in Doha.”

Ford Foundation Renovations by Gensler Approved by New York Landmarks Commission

14:05 - 20 April, 2016
Ford Foundation Renovations by Gensler Approved by New York Landmarks Commission, Rendering of Atrium Modifications. Image via YIMBY
Rendering of Atrium Modifications. Image via YIMBY

The Ford Foundation has received Landmarks Preservation Commission (LPC) approval for renovations to its building at 320 E 43rd Street in Midtown Manhattan, reports New York Yimby. Constructed from 1963 to 1967, with a design by Kevin Roche and John Dinkeloo and an atrium garden by Dan Kiley, the building became an instant architectural mecca and was made an individual and interior landmark in 1997. The proposed renovations, designed by Gensler, seek to restore a half century of alterations to the building’s appearance, in addition to subtle changes to adhere to adhere to fire and accessibility codes.

US Architecture School Bans Styrene as Model Making Material

14:00 - 20 April, 2016
US Architecture School Bans Styrene as Model Making Material, via Madeleine Underwood, Student Life
via Madeleine Underwood, Student Life

By next Fall, the architecture students of Washington University in St. Louis will no longer be allowed to use Styrene on their projects. The university's newspaper, Student Life reports that the commonly used white plastic material was deemed in 2014 by the National Research Council's National Toxicology Program as "reasonably anticipated to be a human carcinogen." Thus the Sam Fox School of Design is taking its own measures to protect their student's health. A number of other schools and cities have already banned Styrene since the NRC's ruling. 

Charles Renfro Discusses DS+R's Winning Proposal for Zaryadye Park in Moscow

12:00 - 20 April, 2016

At last year's Moscow Urban Forum, Charles Renfro discussed Diller Scofidio + Renfro's design for Zaryadye Park in Moscow. Located in the heart of the city, the park employs Wild Urbanist principles, which seek to emulate Russia's diverse landscapes – tundra, steppe, forest, and wetland – against a backdrop of architectural landmarks that includes the Kremlin, Red Square, and St. Basil’s Cathedral.

Ingenhoven Architects Reveal Plans for Green Towers in Tokyo

06:00 - 20 April, 2016
Ingenhoven Architects Reveal Plans for Green Towers in Tokyo, A new office tower (height 185 m) and a residential tower (height 220 m) will be built on both sides of the existing Toranomon Hills Mori Tower. Together they will form the new Toranomon business and lifestyle center. (Competition proposal image). Image © ingenhoven architects
A new office tower (height 185 m) and a residential tower (height 220 m) will be built on both sides of the existing Toranomon Hills Mori Tower. Together they will form the new Toranomon business and lifestyle center. (Competition proposal image). Image © ingenhoven architects

ingenhoven architects has released its design for the Toranomon Project, a new business and lifestyle development that will include a 175,000-square-meter office tower and a 122,000-square-meter residential tower, which will become Tokyo’s highest residential building at approximately 220 meters tall.

Located in the Toranomon area of Tokyo, the project will be built around the existing Toranomon Hills Mori Tower, with respect for the existing structure, but with its own identity as a set of nodes in the larger urban green network.

Civilization in Perspective: Capturing the World From Above

04:00 - 20 April, 2016
Civilization in Perspective: Capturing the World From Above, Forbidden City, Beijing, China. Image Courtesy of Daily Overview. © Satellite images 2016, DigitalGlobe, Inc
Forbidden City, Beijing, China. Image Courtesy of Daily Overview. © Satellite images 2016, DigitalGlobe, Inc

As recently as a century ago the idea of viewing the world from above was little more than a fantasy: the airplane was still in its infancy, with rocketry and satellites still decades into the future. Those who could not take to the air had no recourse but drawing in order to represent their world from an aerial perspective. This limitation is difficult to imagine today when access to plan photography is never further than the nearest Internet connection. Anyone with a smartphone has, in essence, the entire world in their pocket.

Zaha Hadid Architects Will Complete Four Projects in 2016

16:05 - 19 April, 2016
Zaha Hadid Architects Will Complete Four Projects in 2016, © Zaha Hadid Architects
© Zaha Hadid Architects

Zaha Hadid Architects has 36 projects underway in 21 countries, and four of them will be completed this year. The Salerno Maritime Terminal will open later this month, the Port House, Antwerp, in September, the King Abdullah Petroleum Studies and Research Center (KAPSARC) in Riyadh, in October, and the Mathematics Gallery at the Science Museum in London, in December.

In spite of the untimely death of the practice’s namesake last month, the firm has pledged to continue with its slate of projects, stating, “Zaha is in the DNA of Zaha Hadid Architects. She continues to drive and inspire us every day, and we work on as Zaha taught us – with curiosity, integrity, passion and determination.”

TERRA Award for Earthen Architecture Unveils 40 Shortlisted Projects

14:00 - 19 April, 2016
The Great Wall of Western Australia (Pilbara, Western Australia, Oceania) / Luigi Rosselli. Image © Edward Birch
The Great Wall of Western Australia (Pilbara, Western Australia, Oceania) / Luigi Rosselli. Image © Edward Birch

Terra Award, the first international prize for contemporary earthen architectures, has released a shortlist of 40 projects competing for awards in nine categories. The finalists selected span five continents and 67 countries. Each entry was evaluated on a range of topics including: architectural quality and landscape integration, environmental approach and energy performance, creativity and innovation, technical performance, local economy and social intensity, and showcasing of skills. Project materials range from light clay to cob, poured earth, wattle and daub, compressed earth block (CEB), adobe, rammed earth, and others.

Pavilion Ruca Choro (Cauquenes, Chile, South America) / Patricio Merino Mella. Image © Patricio Merino Mella 21st Century Vernacular House (Ayerbe, Spain, Europe) / Angels Castellarnau Visus. Image © Angels Castellarnau Visus The Great Wall of Western Australia (Pilbara, Western Australia, Oceania) / Luigi Rosselli. Image © Edward Birch Zenkonyu x Tamping Earth (Marugame, Japan, Asia) / Tadashi Saito and Atelier NAVE. Image © Toshihiro Misaki +12