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12 Top Apps for Architects on the Construction Site

08:00 - 8 January, 2017
12 Top Apps for Architects on the Construction Site

We have previously published the best apps for architects, many of which try to boost creativity and productivity for project design. Now, we’ve put together a series of helpful apps for the development and management of construction projects. From digital measuring tools to instant software-generated reports of work progress, we hope this new construction technology will be most useful to you.

MIT Develops Multi-Material Design System Slated to Become “Photoshop of 3D Printing”

14:00 - 7 January, 2017

Following last year’s introduction of MultiFab, a multi-material 3D printer, researchers at MIT’s Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory has pioneered a system for designing multi-material objects. The new interface, Foundry, is meant to be accessible to non-programmers, whereas multi-material 3D printing technology has historically been prohibitive both with respect to cost and user-friendliness.

Competition-Winning Design Proposes Wood Housing Addition to Fourth-Century Aqueduct in Istanbul

12:00 - 7 January, 2017
Competition-Winning Design Proposes Wood Housing Addition to Fourth-Century Aqueduct  in Istanbul, Courtesy of Superspace
Courtesy of Superspace

Sinan Günay and Nurhayat Oz of Superspace have won second prize in the MetsäWood competition, The City Above the City, which called for architects to design wooden extensions to city centers. With their project, Colliding Lines and Lives, the team designed a series wooden housing modules to be appended to a fourth-century Roman aqueduct archway in Istanbul.

Built by the Roman emperor Valens, the archway was an important water supply for the Romans and Ottomans but later lost its significance and functionality with technological and infrastructural advancements, leaving it an unutilized landmark in the city.

Courtesy of Superspace Courtesy of Superspace Courtesy of Superspace Courtesy of Superspace +8

These Intricate Illustrations Portray the Details of Fantastical Cities

16:00 - 6 January, 2017
These Intricate Illustrations Portray the Details of Fantastical Cities, © Marta Vilarinho de Freitas
© Marta Vilarinho de Freitas

In the first installment of her series, “Cities and Memory - the Architecture and the City," architect Marta Vilarinho de Freitas created a set of intricately rendered architectural fantasy worlds that straddled the line between realism and abstraction.

Now Vilarinho de Freitas has returned with an additional 7 illustrations, this time experimenting with planimetrics and new cityscape scenes.

© Marta Vilarinho de Freitas © Marta Vilarinho de Freitas © Marta Vilarinho de Freitas © Marta Vilarinho de Freitas +7

New York Plans $10 Billion Renovation of JFK Airport

14:20 - 6 January, 2017
New York Plans $10 Billion Renovation of JFK Airport, Courtesy of State of New York
Courtesy of State of New York

New York City’s busiest airport is about to receive a major overhaul.

Proposed by New York governor Andrew Cuomo, the plan calls for a $10 billion renovation to New York City’s busiest airport, transforming the facility into a “a unified, interconnected, world-class’ complex.”

Courtesy of State of New York Courtesy of State of New York Courtesy of State of New York Courtesy of State of New York +5

HKS Designs New Ballpark for MLB's Texas Rangers

12:00 - 6 January, 2017
HKS Designs New Ballpark for MLB's Texas Rangers, © Texas Rangers Baseball Club / HKS
© Texas Rangers Baseball Club / HKS

HKS Architects has been selected to design a new Major League Baseball stadium for the Texas Rangers, to be built in Arlington, Texas. As part of a new multipurpose sports and entertainment venue, the stadium will feature a retractable roof for climate control and shelter during the hot Texan summers.

Italian Architect Leonardo Benevolo Passes Away Aged 93

09:05 - 6 January, 2017
Italian Architect Leonardo Benevolo Passes Away Aged 93, via Laterza's Interview with Leonardo Benevolo (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hzto2DOcTpk)
via Laterza's Interview with Leonardo Benevolo (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hzto2DOcTpk)

Italian media have reported that Leonardo Benevolo, one of Italy's foremost architects, critics, and historians, passed away yesterday at his home in Brescia following a long illness. Benevolo was an enormously influential figure in the field of architectural history who was continuously examining the problems and possibilities of our cities.

His writings—in particular the book History of Modern Architecture—have been widely circulated, translated and taught, and contribute to his legacy as one of the profession's most distinguished architects and educators. 

Get to Know the Great Zaha Hadid in this Tribute by Her Niece

08:00 - 6 January, 2017
Get to Know the Great Zaha Hadid in this Tribute by Her Niece, © Steve Double
© Steve Double

As we open to a new year, we would like to take a moment and remember one of the most significant lives lost in 2016: Iraqi-born British Pritzker Prize winner Zaha Hadid. While the narrative of Zaha’s trailblazing accomplishments are well-known, architect Rana Hadid celebrates her aunt’s memory from a uniquely poignant perspective in this new piece for the Guardian. Recounting Zaha’s early artistic prowess, fierce ambition, and earnest personality, Rana describes her as “the incredibly warm and generous Zaha who showed us we could do anything we wanted if we worked at it hard enough.”

Iñaki Ábalos' Walter Gropius Lecture at Harvard GSD Dives Into the History and Evolution of the Monastery

06:00 - 6 January, 2017

As he ends his years of service at the Department of Architecture at the Harvard Graduate School of Design (GSD), Iñaki Ábalos has given a Walter Gropius Lecture, customary for departing chairs.

Entitled “Architecture for the Search for Knowledge,” the lecture is named for Ábalos’ mantra by the same words, which is an aphorism written by Friedrich Nietzsche.

Throughout the event, Ábalos delved into various mixed-use typologies, each of which is in some way related to the basic typology of the medieval monastery.

Highlights of the lecture include:

First Look at Kazuyo Sejima's Sumida Hokusai Museum

16:00 - 5 January, 2017
First Look at Kazuyo Sejima's Sumida Hokusai Museum, © Vincent Hecht
© Vincent Hecht

In this photoset, Vincent Hecht takes his lens into the recently completed Sumida Hokusai Museum, designed by pritzker prize winner Kazuyo Sejima, one half of the acclaimed international firm SANAA. Located in the Tokyo neighborhood of Sumida, the 4-story, angular structure will house a collection of over 1800 works by world-renowned ukiyo-e woodblock painter Katsushika Hokusai, who lived in Sumida over 200 years ago.

© Vincent Hecht © Vincent Hecht © Vincent Hecht © Vincent Hecht +21

New Agreement Allows U.S. Architects to Earn Reciprocal Licenses in Australia and New Zealand

14:00 - 5 January, 2017
New Agreement Allows U.S. Architects to Earn Reciprocal Licenses in Australia and New Zealand, © The Shopping Sherpa via Attribution Engine. Licensed under CC BY-ND
© The Shopping Sherpa via Attribution Engine. Licensed under CC BY-ND

For U.S. architects, working abroad will now be easier than ever, as the National Council of Architectural Registration Boards (NCARB) has announced a new mutual recognition arrangement with the licensing authorities of Australia and New Zealand. Effective as of January 1, 2017, the agreement allows architects to earn reciprocal licenses that authorize architects to work in the two countries.

Tate Harmer's "Big Tent" Wins Competition for new Museum of Scouting in London

12:00 - 5 January, 2017
Tate Harmer's "Big Tent" Wins Competition for new Museum of Scouting in London, © Tate Harmer
© Tate Harmer

London-based firm Tate Harmer has won a competition to design a new £6 million ($7.4 million USD) museum for The Scout Association (TSA) at the group’s headquarters in Chingford, east London. Their proposal takes the form of a big, colorful tent that will tell the story of the Scouting movement within a fun, environmentally conscious structure.

© Tate Harmer © Tate Harmer © Tate Harmer © Tate Harmer +10

17 Templates for Common Construction Systems to Help you Materialize Your Projects

08:00 - 5 January, 2017

Earlier this year, Chilean architects and professors Luis Pablo Barros and Gustavo Sarabia from the Federico Santa María University released a book (in Spanish) titled "Sistemas Constructivos Básicos" (Basic Construction Systems)." The book aims to be a tool to help architects translate their plan diagrams into tangible architectural works, as well as to help students learn the knowledge necessary to build what they plan. 

Want to Understand the Destruction of Cultural Heritage in the Middle East? Start Here.

06:00 - 5 January, 2017
Want to Understand the Destruction of Cultural Heritage in the Middle East? Start Here., © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/128659407@N02/17080649713/'>Flickr user Jiří Suchomel</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/2.0/'>CC BY-NC 2.0</a>
© Flickr user Jiří Suchomel licensed under CC BY-NC 2.0

The Aggregate Architectural History Collaborative has organized a collection of essays, entitled The Destruction of Cultural Heritage: From Napoléon to ISIS, which examines several centuries of the demolition of monuments in the Middle East. With world events like ISIS and the protection of architectural heritage growing to be more and more topical, this collection is a useful tool in considering the role of violence, how ancient architecture is perceived as a cultural entity, what role the media has to play, and beyond.

Tetrapylon in the Great Collonnade. Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/128659407@N02/17513452500/'>Flickr user Jiří Suchomel</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/2.0/'>CC BY-NC 2.0</a> Palmyra site overview. Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/128659407@N02/17700957745/'>Flickr user Jiří Suchomel</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/2.0/'>CC BY-NC 2.0</a> Arch of Triumph (detail), destroyed by ISIS, October 2015. Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/akocman/4602306192'>Flickr user Alessandra Kocman</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/2.0/'>CC BY-NC-ND 2.0</a> Temple of Bel, Destroyed by ISIS, August 2015. Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/128659407@N02/17078565884/'>Flickr user Jiří Suchomel</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/2.0/'>CC BY-NC 2.0</a> +5

Cities Need Change: The Durability of Jane Jacob's Legacy

04:00 - 5 January, 2017

In an exclusive half-hour episode focusing on the life and legacy of Jane Jacobs, "one of the most influential urban thinkers and city activists of our time." Featuring interviews with a carefully selected range of city planners, historians and activists, alongside recordings of Jacobs herself, this special episode of Monocle 24's The Urbanist examines why Jacobs was—and remains—so influential when considering the contemporary city.

Challenge Your Spatial Perception Skills with This New Game

16:25 - 4 January, 2017

Looking for a challenging new diversion that will keep your architectural mind humming? A new puzzle game from developers Dusty Road, Empty, may just fit the bill.

Arkitema Architects Designs Hill-Shaped Visitors Center for Mols Bjerge National Park

14:00 - 4 January, 2017
Arkitema Architects Designs Hill-Shaped Visitors Center for Mols Bjerge National Park, North Perspective. Image Courtesy of Arkitema Architects
North Perspective. Image Courtesy of Arkitema Architects

Arkitema Architects has unveiled their winning proposal for a new visitors center at Mols Bjerge National Park in Denmark. To be located adjacent to the historic Kalø Castle Ruins, the design draws inspiration from the surrounding landscape, taking the form of a softly sloping hill.

West Perspective. Image Courtesy of Arkitema Architects Interior Perspective. Image Courtesy of Arkitema Architects Interior Perspective. Image Courtesy of Arkitema Architects North Elevation. Image Courtesy of Arkitema Architects +7

Evil vs. Impressive: How do Scale and Lighting Affect Perception of Architecture?

12:30 - 4 January, 2017
Evil vs. Impressive: How do Scale and Lighting Affect Perception of Architecture?

When it comes to viral architecture, readers love a sense of the theatrical. This trend has led to a new internet obsession: ‘evil’ buildings that look like they could be the home of a supervillain or nefarious corporation.

Compiled on sites such as Reddit and BoredPanda, lists of ‘Evil Buildings’ tend to feature structures that feel sterile to non-architects, photographed in dramatic lighting or surrounded in fog. Projects by Zaha Hadid Architects, Frank Gehry and Ole Scheeren are among those represented. But what exactly makes these buildings feel evil?

This Spectacular Aerial Video Shows the Whole LA River Before its Transformation

08:30 - 4 January, 2017

At its best, architecture has the power to confront the world’s most urgent social and environmental issues. The Los Angeles River sits at the center of many of these issues, thanks to the long-overdue plans to convert it from a concrete canal back into a social space and an ecological corridor; and thanks to its position as a symbol of the drought in California. In this serene video by filmmaker Chang Kim, the full length of the river is put on display, exploring a resource that is the topic of much debate in the Los Angeles area.

The AR Celebrates 50 Years of Venturi's "Complexity and Contradiction in Architecture"

06:00 - 4 January, 2017
The AR Celebrates 50 Years of Venturi's "Complexity and Contradiction in Architecture", AD Classics: Vanna Venturi House / Robert Venturi. Image © Maria Buszek
AD Classics: Vanna Venturi House / Robert Venturi. Image © Maria Buszek

The Architectural Review has recently published an article celebrating the 50th anniversary of Robert Venturi’s book, Complexity and Contradiction in Architecture, which is regarded as one of the most important writings about architecture since Le Corbusier’s Vers une Architecture. In the article, Martino Stierli—Chief Curator of Architecture and Design at the Museum of Modern Art—delves into the significance of Venturi’s work, the motivation behind it, its continuing impact, and more. Read the full article at the Architectural Review, here.

Michael Wolf Explains the Vision Behind his Hong Kong Photo Series, “Architecture of Density”

16:10 - 3 January, 2017

I see it a bit as my mission to document things in Hong Kong which are vanishing, which are disappearing, primarily through urban renewal

In this short film from Yitiao Video, photographer Michael Wolf explains the vision behind his momentous photo series, “Architecture of Density,” in which he captures the immense scale and incredible intricacies of the city of Hong Kong.

After living in city for 9 years and travelling abroad to work, Wolf describes the somewhat unpleasant circumstances which led him to turn his attention to his own environment.

These Graphics Imagine Unrealized Architectural Plans as Beautiful Snowflakes

14:00 - 3 January, 2017
These Graphics Imagine Unrealized Architectural Plans as Beautiful Snowflakes, Courtesy of KOSMOS
Courtesy of KOSMOS

Much like snowflakes, the most beautiful architectural plans consist of complex relationships between geometries – and no two are exactly alike. In this spirit, KOSMOS Architects has created a series of planimetric graphics of some of the most notable architectural projects to have disappeared from our world in celebration of the New Year.

6 Practices Recognized as Social Design Innovators by Curry Stone Design Prize

12:30 - 3 January, 2017
6 Practices Recognized as Social Design Innovators by Curry Stone Design Prize, © José Bastidas / Pico Collective Courtesy of Curry Stone Design Prize. ImageCustomized size and shape basketball court. La Ye 5 de Julio, Petare, Caracas
© José Bastidas / Pico Collective Courtesy of Curry Stone Design Prize. ImageCustomized size and shape basketball court. La Ye 5 de Julio, Petare, Caracas

In the past 10 years, the Curry Stone Design Prize has grown to become one of the world’s preeminent awards honoring socially impactful design professionals and the influence of design as a force for improving lives and strengthening communities.

This year, in honor of the prize’s 10th anniversary, the Curry Stone Foundation will acknowledge the largest group of influential practices yet, recognizing 100 firms over the next twelve months as members of the “Social Design Circle.” Each firm will be profiled on the award website, as well as participate in the foundation’s new podcast, Social Design Insights, beginning on January 5th, 2017.

SOHO China Property Mogul Zhang Xin on the Chinese Economy and Her Changing Business Model

08:30 - 3 January, 2017
SOHO China Property Mogul Zhang Xin on the Chinese Economy and Her Changing Business Model, Galaxy Soho / Zaha Hadid Architects . Image © Iwan Baan
Galaxy Soho / Zaha Hadid Architects . Image © Iwan Baan

German magazine Der Spiegel has conducted an interview with Zhang Xin, billionaire real estate mogul and founder of SOHO China—the company behind such well-known buildings as Zaha Hadid Architects' Galaxy SOHO and Wangjing SOHO. In the interview, Xin discusses the Chinese economy, her changing business model, digitalization, the symbolic value of buildings, and more. Learn more about Xin’s take on success and change in China by reading the full interview here.