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BIG's 2016 Serpentine Pavilion Opens Alongside 4 Summerhouses

12:50 - 7 June, 2016
BIG's Serpentine Pavilion. Image © Iwan Baan
BIG's Serpentine Pavilion. Image © Iwan Baan

The 2016 Serpentine Pavilion, designed by BIG, has today been unveiled at the Serpentine Gallery in Hyde Park, London. The design consists of an "unzipped wall" in which a straight line of tubular fiberglass bricks at the top of the wall is split into two undulating sides, housing the program of the pavilion. For the first time, the 2016 Serpentine Pavilion is also accompanied by four "summerhouses" designed by Kunlé Adeyemi, Barkow Leibinger, Yona Friedman and Asif Khan. The Pavilion and summerhouses will open to the public later this week, on June 10th, and will be in place until October 9th. Read on to find out more about all five designs.

Kunlé Adeyemi's Summerhouse. Image © Iwan Baan Barkow Leibinger's Summerhouse. Image © Iwan Baan Yona Friedman's Summerhouse. Image © Iwan Baan Asif Khan's Summerhouse. Image © Iwan Baan +17

OMA Selected for Buffalo's Albright-Knox Art Gallery Expansion

12:15 - 7 June, 2016
OMA Selected for Buffalo's Albright-Knox Art Gallery Expansion, Courtesy of OMA
Courtesy of OMA

Buffalo’s Albright-Knox Art Gallery has selected OMA to expand and refurbish the historic museum and its campus. The project team is being lead by OMA New York’s Principal, Shohei Shigematsu, who will spend the next year in partnership with the museum and in consultation with the community on how to renew and revitalize the august institution. Known as AK360, the building will be OMA’s first art museum project in the United States, and the Albright-Knox’s first expansion in more than a half-century. According to the museum, the project’s name is a reflection on this being the institution’s third expansion in its 154-year history, in addition, it establishes an embrace of public feedback and the acknowledges the condition of being encircled by parkland.

Phyllis Lambert Receives the 2016 Wolf Prize for the Arts in Israel

16:15 - 6 June, 2016
Phyllis Lambert Receives the 2016 Wolf Prize for the Arts in Israel, Phyllis Lambert receiving the Wolf Prize for the Arts, with Israeli President Reuven Rivlin. Image © Oded Antman
Phyllis Lambert receiving the Wolf Prize for the Arts, with Israeli President Reuven Rivlin. Image © Oded Antman

Phyllis Lambert, architect and Founding Director Emeritus of the Canadian Centre for Architecture (CCA), has been announced as the winner of the 2016 Wolf Prize for the Arts. Awarded by the Wolf Foundation in Israel on June 2, the architect was cited for six decades of championing innovations in building design, for her preservation and regeneration efforts with significant historical works, and for her leadership the field of architectural research.

Latvian Museum of Contemporary Art Reveals Shortlisted Designs

12:15 - 6 June, 2016
Latvian Museum of Contemporary Art Reveals Shortlisted Designs, © Malcolm Reading Consultants
© Malcolm Reading Consultants

The design proposals of seven shortlisted finalists for the Latvian Museum of Contemporary Art Design Competition have been released by the competition’s organizer, Malcolm Reading Consultants. Located in the capital city of Riga, the funding for the €30 million project is a public private partnership with support from from the ABLV Charitable Foundation and the Boris and Ināra Teterev Foundation, which co-founded the Latvian Museum of Contemporary Art Foundation. The Ministry of Culture of the Republic of Latvia and the Museum’s Foundation signed a memorandum of intent regarding the museum and building on 30 October 2014. The competition, organized in 2015 with 25 first-stage participants, will announce a jury-selected winner in mid-June.

Watch These 42 City Skylines Grow in Before and After Image Transformations

06:00 - 6 June, 2016
Watch These 42 City Skylines Grow in Before and After Image Transformations, Courtesy of RENTCafe
Courtesy of RENTCafe

Over the past few decades, cities all around the world have undergone major changes as a part of global urbanization processes. More than fifty percent of the world’s population currently resides in cities, and by 2030, the world is anticipated to have 41 mega-cities with 10 million inhabitants or more.

With such large population growth, cities have likewise experienced unparalleled changes and development. In order to showcase the dramatic transformations of some of the world’s largest cities, like Paris, Sydney, Dubai, and Hong Kong, RENTCafe has compiled a series of Street View images that superimpose skylines of the past against what they look like today.

Find out how 42 skylines in 16 major cities have changed over time, after the break.

12 Things You Need to See at the 2016 Venice Biennale

04:00 - 6 June, 2016
"Reporting From the Front". Image © Italo Rondinella
"Reporting From the Front". Image © Italo Rondinella

There is an enormous intensity of information, knowledge and ideas on display at this year's Venice Architecture Biennale, Reporting From the Front. With all the Executive Editors and Editors-in-Chief of ArchDaily's platforms in English, Spanish and (Brazilian) Portuguese in Venice for the opening of the 2016 Venice Architecture Biennale—plus co-founder David Basulto and European Editor-at-Large James Taylor-Foster, who curated this year's Nordic Pavilion—we've pooled together twelve of our initial favourite exhibitions and must-see shows.

Financial Times Article Details How Biomimicry Can be Applied to Architecture

14:00 - 5 June, 2016
Financial Times Article Details How Biomimicry Can be Applied to Architecture, © Flickr CC User kudumomo
© Flickr CC User kudumomo

In a recent article published by the Financial Times, architect and public speaker Michael Pawlyn delves into how biomimicry can be applied to architecture in order to solve design problems and create a more sustainable future. Even in very early examples, biomimicry has been critical in the development of architecture, for example when Filippo Brunelleschi studied eggshells to create a thinner and lighter dome for his cathedral in Florence. In a modern example, biomimicry has been utilized—through the examination of termite mounds—to create cool environments without air conditioning in warm climates such as in Zimbabwe. 

Against The Tide: Inside Chile's Pavilion at the 2016 Venice Biennale

12:00 - 5 June, 2016
Against The Tide: Inside Chile's Pavilion at the 2016 Venice Biennale, Courtesy of Consejo Nacional de la Cultura y las Artes
Courtesy of Consejo Nacional de la Cultura y las Artes

As part of ArchDaily's coverage of the 2016 Venice Biennale, we are presenting a series of articles written by the curators of the exhibitions and installations on show.

Against the tide presents the efforts of a generation of young architects who have conceived, designed, and constructed works of architecture, while also arranging their financial and contractual aspects as part of the requirements for their professional degree in architecture. All they have in common is that they belong to the Central Valley of Chile, where they have returned following their academic training to contribute to their communities, creating architectural projects which connect to a set of places where the region’s campesinos and their families can live and work.

© Laurian Ghinitoiu Courtesy of Consejo Nacional de la Cultura y las Artes © Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu +15

Beatriz Colomina on the Correlation Between Playboy and Architecture

09:30 - 5 June, 2016

Beatriz Colomina, Professor of Architecture at Princeton, recently gave an interview to Architect Magazine on the current exhibition of her thesis—“Playboy Architecture 1953-1979”—at the Elmhurst Museum in Chicago. Her interest in the correlation between Playboy and architecture began nearly thirty years ago with her exploration on the role of gender and architecture in the work of Adolf Loos and Le Corbusier. From there, she began to observe numerous parallels between Playboy and the world of design.

Alejandro Aravena's Downloadable Housing Plans and the Real Meaning of "Open-Source Urbanism"

08:00 - 5 June, 2016
Alejandro Aravena's Downloadable Housing Plans and the Real Meaning of "Open-Source Urbanism", Courtesy of Elemental
Courtesy of Elemental

Earlier this year, we reported that 2016 Pritzker Prize winner Alejandro Aravena announced that his practice, ELEMENTAL, released four of their social housing designs available to the public for open source use. A recent article published by Urbanisms in beta discusses what exactly “open source use” means to the architecture world, and how we may see these designs applied to projects in the future.

AD Interviews: Golden Lion Winners Iñaqui Carnicero & Carlos Quintáns / 2016 Venice Biennale

11:00 - 4 June, 2016

At the opening of the 2016 Venice Biennale, ArchDaily and PLANE—SITE had the unique opportunity to interview Carlos Quintáns & Iñaqui Carnicero and ask them about "UNFINISHED"—an exhibition that uncovers design strategies that take an optimistic view of the built environment. This idea of exhibiting architecture that revels in the patina acquired through the passage of time and that shows how architects have learned from Spain's recent economic crisis earned the Pavilion the Golden Lion for Best National Participation. The jury cited Quintáns & Carnicero's "concisely curated selection of emerging architects whose work shows how creativity and commitment can transcend material constraints."

To see the video with subtitles, make sure that the "CC" button is selected.

© Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu +9

Sabri Pasayigit Design Office Releases Master Plan for Turkish Municipality

08:00 - 4 June, 2016
Sabri Pasayigit Design Office Releases Master Plan for Turkish Municipality, Courtesy of Sabri Pasayigit Design Office
Courtesy of Sabri Pasayigit Design Office

Architecture and planning firm Sabri Pasayigit Design Office has released its new master plan for the Municipality of Kayseri in the Sahabiye neighborhood of Kayseri, Turkey.

The project balances historic and modern architecture elements, with a focus on the historic castle of Kayseri as the city center point. Cultural and public buildings will be placed near this historic center, with taller buildings set farther out of the city.

Cut Maps Adds Contemporary Precision to Cartographic Objects

16:15 - 3 June, 2016
Cut Maps Adds Contemporary Precision to Cartographic Objects , Oak State Art, Ohio. Image Courtesy of Cut Maps
Oak State Art, Ohio. Image Courtesy of Cut Maps

Have you ever wanted to decorate your walls with old-style maps but been discouraged because they don't fit your minimal and contemporary aesthetic? Enter Cut Maps, the Virginia-based company that creates cartographic representations of cities and states using laser technologies to precisely define borders and streets. The resultant maps offer the illusion of their paper precedents, but with an otherworldly precision only possible in the digital age. 

CityLab Article Details da Vinci's Technically Astounding Map of Imola

08:00 - 3 June, 2016
CityLab Article Details da Vinci's Technically Astounding Map of Imola, Public domain, via <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/'>Wikimedia</a> Commons
Public domain, via Wikimedia Commons

CityLab has recently published an article outlining Leonardo da Vinci's Town Plan of Imola, an "ichnographic" map from 1502, and the earliest of its kind in existence. Rather than utilizing elevations or oblique mapping methods like most other Renaissance mappers, da Vinci developed his own technique -- possibly using special hodometer and magnetic compass technologies that he invented -- to draw the city "as if viewed from an infinite number of viewpoints."

Federico Babina's ARCHIWRITER Illustrations Visualize the "Architecture of a Text"

12:00 - 2 June, 2016

“Immersed in reading a book it feels like [being] inside an architecture, a metaphysical space surrounded by the words,” says Federico Babina, discussing his latest series of illustrations, ARCHIWRITER. In the new series of 27 drawings, the illustrator has created “portraits” of authors by personifying their writing styles, periods, and locations as built environments made from architectural elements and words. Heightening this sense of individuality, Babina states that the resultant portraits can be “fluctuating, vernacular, itinerant, ephemeral, concentric, labyrinthine, surrealist, oneiric, and futuristic.”

Spotlight: Toyo Ito

12:00 - 1 June, 2016
Spotlight: Toyo Ito, Serpentine Gallery Pavilion 2002 / Toyo Ito + Cecil Balmond + Arup. Image © Sylvain Deleu
Serpentine Gallery Pavilion 2002 / Toyo Ito + Cecil Balmond + Arup. Image © Sylvain Deleu

As one of the leading architects of Japan's increasingly highly-regarded architecture culture, 2013 Pritzker Laureate Toyo Ito (born June 1, 1941) has defined his career by combining elements of minimalism with an embrace of technology, in a way that merges both traditional and contemporary elements of Japanese culture.

Tetrarc Architects Unveils Design Proposal for the Rennes Conservatory

08:00 - 1 June, 2016
Tetrarc Architects Unveils Design Proposal for the Rennes Conservatory , © AirStudio
© AirStudio

France-based Tetrarc Architects has revealed their design for the new Conservatory of Rennes in France. Intended to be the cornerstone of a new urban project, the fifty-meter long cubic volume is intersected by “cuts and curves that give it an elegant, sculptural presence.” This cultural facility will bring five programs under one roof, including spaces for musical activities, an auditorium, dance theaters, administration spaces, and an area for the Pont Supérieur Music Department.

Spotlight: Norman Foster

06:00 - 1 June, 2016
Spotlight: Norman Foster, Spaceport America. Image © Nigel Young
Spaceport America. Image © Nigel Young

Arguably the leading name of a generation of internationally high-profile British architects, Norman Foster (born 1 June 1935) - or to give him his full title Norman Robert Foster, Baron Foster of Thames Bank of Reddish, OM, HonFREng - gained recognition as early as the 1970s as a key architect in the high-tech movement, which continues to have a profound impact on architecture as we know it today.

Gabinete de Arquitectura’s “Breaking the Siege” – Winner of the Golden Lion at the 2016 Venice Biennale

16:00 - 31 May, 2016
Gabinete de Arquitectura’s “Breaking the Siege” – Winner of the Golden Lion at the 2016 Venice Biennale, © Laurian Ghinitoiu
© Laurian Ghinitoiu

Bricks are an iconic element of Solano Benítez’s studio. An ancestral material, forged by man using an ancient technique of modeling and baking. Bricks are very versatile, cheap and easy to manufacture – even marginalized areas of the world can afford to build houses with brick. Benítez feels the poetry of brick and has experimented with its versatility, relying solely on bricks as the main construction material. [1]

Gabinete de Arquitectura's exhibition, designed by Solano Benítez, Gloria Cabral and Solanito Benítez, was awarded the Golden Lion for Best Participant in the International Exhibition, Reporting From the Front, for “harnessing simple materials, structural ingenuity and unskilled labour to bring architecture to underserved communities.”

© Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu +11

Are Tree-Covered Skyscrapers Really All They Set Out to Be?

14:00 - 31 May, 2016
Are Tree-Covered Skyscrapers Really All They Set Out to Be?, Peruri 88, a 400-meter proposal by MVRDV for Jakarta. Image Courtesy of RSI-Studio
Peruri 88, a 400-meter proposal by MVRDV for Jakarta. Image Courtesy of RSI-Studio

Are tree covered buildings really in tune with ecological and sustainable principles, or are they just a form of greenwashing? This is the question posed by Kurt Kohlstedt in his essay, Renderings vs. Reality: The Improbable Rise of Tree-Covered Skyscrapers, for 99% Invisible. The author notes that vegetated designs come about for myriad reasons – the appearance of sustainability, better air and views, investment intrigue – but that most of these concepts will never leave the realm of paper or virtual architecture. For as many reasons that these buildings have become popular, there are detractors for why they simply cannot be built, including daunting construction hurdles (extra concrete and steel), vast irrigation systems, added wind load complexities, and the trees themselves having difficulty adapting to their vertiginous conditions.

LIAG Architects Design Energy Saving Art Storage Facility

12:00 - 31 May, 2016
 LIAG Architects Design Energy Saving Art Storage Facility, Courtesy of LIAG architects
Courtesy of LIAG architects

LIAG Architects has unveiled their design for a new art storage building. Commissioned by the Rijksmuseum in Amsterdam, the aim of the project was to create a large open space, while simultaneously meeting other needs such as protecting art that can't be exposed to daylight, controlling the temperature in certain zones, and using minimum amounts of energy to operate the building.

BLUE: Architecture of UN Peacekeeping Missions: Inside the Netherlands' Pavilion at the 2016 Venice Biennale

07:00 - 31 May, 2016

As part of ArchDaily's coverage of the 2016 Venice Biennale, we are presenting a series of articles written by the curators of the exhibitions and installations on show.

After the collapse of the Soviet Union, and increasingly since 9/11 and the “War on Terror” that followed, warfare has moved into the city.

While the wars of the 20th century were waged largely between nations, over territorial sovereignty and along disputed borders, the wars of the 21st century are internal and borderless. They are fought between large multinational coalitions and insurgent networks.

BLUE: Architecture of Peacekeeping Missions. Image © Laurian Ghinitoiu BLUE: Architecture of Peacekeeping Missions. Image © Laurian Ghinitoiu BLUE: Architecture of Peacekeeping Missions. Image © Laurian Ghinitoiu BLUE: Architecture of Peacekeeping Missions. Image © Laurian Ghinitoiu +14

Spotlight: Frei Otto

06:00 - 31 May, 2016
Spotlight: Frei Otto, Munich Olympic Stadium. Image © Atelier Frei Otto Warmbronn
Munich Olympic Stadium. Image © Atelier Frei Otto Warmbronn

German architect and structural engineer Frei Otto (31 May 1925 – 9 March 2015) as well known for his pioneering innovations in lightweight and tensile structures. Shortly before his death in 2015 he was awarded the Pritzker Prize and prior to that he was awarded the RIBA Royal Gold Medal in 2006. Much of his research in lightweight structures is as relevant today as when he first proposed them over 60 years ago, and his work continues to inform architects and engineers to this day.

In Therapy: Inside the Nordic Pavilion at the 2016 Venice Biennale

04:15 - 31 May, 2016
In Therapy: Inside the Nordic Pavilion at the 2016 Venice Biennale, The central installation (the pyramid) is encloses, but does not hide, the three remaining original trees inside the pavilion. Image © Laurian Ghinitoiu
The central installation (the pyramid) is encloses, but does not hide, the three remaining original trees inside the pavilion. Image © Laurian Ghinitoiu

As part of ArchDaily's coverage of the 2016 Venice Biennale, we are presenting a series of articles written by the curators of the exhibitions and installations on show.

You are part of another’s shadow.
—Sverre Fehn in conversation with Per Olaf Fjeld

A central impetus for this exhibition is to acknowledge the presence of the ‘ghosts’ of Nordic architecture – those architects, theorists and educators—the most famous of which are often described as ‘Modern Masters’—who continue to exert influence on contemporary practice and pedagogy. Indeed, one of the most prominent of these gures, the Norwegian Sverre Fehn, designed the Nordic Pavilion. This exhibition addresses a common challenge faced by Finns, Norwegians and Swedes today: how can a building (or an exhibition, in this instance) exist in a dialogue with its setting when that setting is so charged? For us, this ties into a broader question: how can architecture occupy a legacy while still making progress?

The pyramid, built from Swedish pine, represents an inhabitable installation – an urban artefact in a very public pavilion. Image © Laurian Ghinitoiu Intimate "Rooms Without Walls" sit next to the main installation. Image © Laurian Ghinitoiu The pyramid is a "discourse machine," designed to allow people to critically discuss the issues at the heart of the exhibition in an open air environment. Image © Laurian Ghinitoiu The pyramid exists in dialogue with the building. Here, it's relationship with the existing staircase is made apparent. Image © Laurian Ghinitoiu +42