Roadmap 2050: A Practical Guide to a Prosperous, Low-Carbon Europe.

is a design and research studio inside OMA, a think tank operating on the boundaries of architecture: media, politics, sociology, sustainability, technology, fashion, curating, publishing and graphic design. Some of their works include the barcode flag for the EU and a study for Wired magazine.

And while covers sustainable strategies on a building or master plan scale, AMO is approaching it on en European scale as one of the five consultants conducting technical, economic and policy analyses for Roadmap 2050, an initiative by the European Climate Foundation which looks to chart a policy roadmap for the next 5-10 years based on the European leaders’ commitment to an 80-95% reduction in CO2 emissions by 2050. You can download a brief of Roadmap 2050 in PDF.

Roadmap 2050 © AMO
Roadmap 2050 © AMO

The goal is to achieve a 2% energy efficiency saving per year in order to meet this goal, with power and vehicle transportation being the most important areas.

Through the complete integration and synchronization of the EU’s energy infrastructure, Europe can take maximum advantage of its geographical diversity. The report’s findings show that by 2050, the simultaneous presence of various renewable energy sources within the EU can create a complementary system of energy provision ensuring energy security for future generations.

AMO’s work focuses on the production of a graphic narrative which conceptualizes and visualizes the geographic, political, and cultural implications of the integrated, decarbonized European power sector.

On their study you can find an interesting approach to a diverse european energy grid, including energy trade and the use of new non-traditional sources.

Eneropa © AMO
Eneropa © AMO

The image of “Eneropa” appears as a new continent based on its energy production: Biomassburg, Geothermalia, Solaria, the Tidal States… are part of this new territory. Other branding concepts are introduced on the study, creating a tangible image of this ambitious plan, which reminds the powerful (yet simple) idea behind the barcode flag.

You can download the full study in PDF format at the Roadmap 2050 website.

More after the break:

Energy source © AMO
Energy source © AMO
Power grid 2050 © AMO
Power grid 2050 © AMO
Solar / wind energy © AMO
Solar / wind energy © AMO
Decarbonized grid power distribution © AMO
Decarbonized grid power distribution © AMO
Cite: Basulto, David. "Roadmap 2050: A Practical Guide to a Prosperous, Low-Carbon Europe." 13 Apr 2010. ArchDaily. Accessed 24 Jul 2014. <http://www.archdaily.com/?p=56229>

14 comments

  1. Thumb up Thumb down 0

    Good beginning but far over scale! Electricity is a very bad energy in term of transport… act global but THINK LOCAL!
    No 46 GW crossing on 1000km…

    • Thumb up Thumb down 0

      Electricity is a very GOOD energy in terms of transport. For example, the TOTAL electrical losses in the Spanish T&D grid accounted for less than 8% of the electricity consumption in 2008 (data from UNESA and REE). Compare this to any other logistic chain! The gains in term of efficiency of big plants located in the regions with best available resource outweighs by far these losses.

  2. Thumb up Thumb down 0

    well in their plan they project a nuclear power plant in north west spain, its stupid cause that area is one of the biggest renewable energy producers in europe; if there is already a big production of water and wind energy and huge posibilities of sea energy dont think that is ethical to build a nuclear plant there even more when nuclear power has no future

    looks like they didnt care much about the existing information

    • Thumb up Thumb down 0

      Since renewable energy also often is unreliable, it may be a good idea to build a nuclear power plant in Spain. The nuclear power would then supply a base load and in combination with the renewables, ensure that power always is availible.

  3. Thumb up Thumb down 0

    – AMO’s work focuses on the production of a graphic narrative which conceptualizes and visualizes the geographic, political, and cultural implications of the integrated, decarbonized European power sector. –

    wait… all those big words and all they actually did was the graphic design?

  4. Thumb up Thumb down 0

    upon reading the actual document, the REAL analysis work was done by McKinsey & Company, KEMA, Imperial College London, and Oxford University.

    THANKS for attributing work, man.

Share your thoughts