ArchDaily | Broadcasting Architecture Worldwidethe world's most visited architecture website
i

Sign up now and start saving and organizing your favorite architecture projects and photos

i

Find the most inspiring products for your projects in our Product Catalog.

i

Get the ArchDaily Chrome Extension and be inspired with every new tab. Install here »

h

Nominate now the Building of the Year 2017 »

All
Projects
Products
Events
Competitions
  1. ArchDaily
  2. Projects
  3. Community Center
  4. Japan
  5. Archivision
  6. 2009
  7. Fujitsobo / Archivision

Fujitsobo / Archivision

  • 01:00 - 1 February, 2010
Fujitsobo / Archivision
Fujitsobo / Archivision, © Yuichi Higurashi
© Yuichi Higurashi

© Yuichi Higurashi © Yuichi Higurashi © Yuichi Higurashi © Yuichi Higurashi +29

  • Architects

  • Location

    Tokyo, Japan
  • Principals In Charge

    Yoshihiro Hirotani & Yusaku Ishida
  • Structural Engineers

    Umezawa Structural Engineers
  • Mechanical Engineers

    Azu Planning
  • General Contractor

    Daido Housing
  • Area

    67.88 sqm
  • Project Year

    2009
  • Photographs

From the architect. This beauty parlor stands in the Omote-sando area of Tokyo, which represents one of the trend setting centers for this metropolis. The building has three roof openings which pours light into the interior and, which, by slit-like openings in the floor is led into the floors below, reaching the ground floor, which in turn can be seen from the street level through its large glass windows.

floor plans
floor plans

Thereby, expressing the image of a “vessel of light.” It is, also, a message of “nature” in an area where there is an abundance of “artificial” light. Structurally, the shape of a “barnacle” with its thin yet hard cladding being the image, the three four-cornered conical forms in reinforced concrete are the structural elements for the roof and walls. Copper sheets cover the intricate shapes of the roof and walls as the finish material for the building, which has incorporated the exterior insulation construction method. The copper sheets, which change with the passing of time, have been used to express “Time” in an area where information and environments are ever rapidly changing.

© Yuichi Higurashi
© Yuichi Higurashi

This small piece of architecture is an experimental expression of the universal theme of “light” and “time.”

© Yuichi Higurashi
© Yuichi Higurashi
Location to be used only as a reference. It could indicate city/country but not exact address. Cite: "Fujitsobo / Archivision" 01 Feb 2010. ArchDaily. Accessed . <http://www.archdaily.com/47647/fujitsobo-archivision/>
Read comments

20 Comments

Rutland Copper · October 27, 2010

As a copper aficionado, I enjoy seeing copper architecture. Copper is one of the best green building materials known to man and I would like to see more architecture employ it. This is a simple, yet attractive design, providing good volume for the footprint. The inside is a little sterile for me, but this supposedly houses a beauty parlor. Like no beauty parlor I've ever seen. I applaud the architect's resolve!

Architecture Topic · April 05, 2010

Architecture #Architecture: Fujitsobo / Archivision... http://bit.ly/cp3Far

RGoldschmidt · February 28, 2010

Ok, I'm not a rasist, but this house or building is looking like gipsey's house roof in Romania, only that they don't use that material and skin.

Rodrigo Tello · February 04, 2010

Pezo Von Elrichshausen - Chile

gwri · February 03, 2010

the outside is beautiful

Michael Baugus · February 03, 2010

Copper as cladding? Fujitsobo / Archivision. http://bit.ly/aHwnO9

Modern Zen Architecture · February 03, 2010

In time, just like the Statue of Liberty (made of copper), this cute little architectural wonder will turn into a moldy green color.

Now that it's new, I hope lightning never strikes it. Copper is also a very good conductor of electricity.

Salt · October 27, 2010 09:32 PM

You would rather it burst into flames when hit by lightning instead of conducting the electrical energy harmlessly to ground? Copper patina is not mold - it is oxidation of the copper surface which develops a protective natural patina. reds, browns, blue-greens as it ages and gives copper its extraordinary long life, durabilty, zero maintenance and very eco-friendly green stature. Most people find the pastel green hue pleasing and more natural.

Dr Stephan · February 03, 2010 02:03 AM

it is also quite poisonous which make it a very strange choice of facade material for a house.

arqshow · February 02, 2010

kohoku + Parr = Fujitsobo

Arquipablo · February 02, 2010

another volcano roof.....!!?

really.... have any special meaning that I do not know...?

mima · February 02, 2010

who is using this and what is this building used for?

kazu · February 02, 2010

can&#39t wait to see this patina: http://www.archdaily.com/47647...

Kevin Parent · February 02, 2010

RT @archdaily: Fujitsobo / Archivision http://bit.ly/aeeIow

chicago_g · February 02, 2010

looks familiar....

Mark Kageyama · February 02, 2010

RT @homedecornews: Fujitsobo / Archivision http://bit.ly/bPszSx

Home Decor News · February 02, 2010

Fujitsobo / Archivision http://bit.ly/bPszSx

AA · February 02, 2010

What happens when the snow fall?

JL · February 02, 2010

looks like a chocolate factory...

Dude · February 02, 2010
Kangaceiro Gozador · February 09, 2010 01:41 PM

ARCHITECTURE OF 1950 with a new skin…

Owners don´t have money …..or no haven´t head ?

INawe · February 02, 2010 01:27 AM

I like the Parr House way better than the house in Kohuku and the above project. The courtyard spaces make it that much richer. The other two are one liners and are just about doing a "cool" form.

hbchbc · February 01, 2010

Interesting....:-)

Brion · February 01, 2010

Looks like this project:

http://www.archdaily.com/6893/...

···

Comments are closed

Read comments
© Yuichi Higurashi

Fujitsobo 美容院/ Archivision