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  1. ArchDaily
  2. Projects
  3. Houses
  4. India
  5. Khosla Associates
  6. 2013
  7. The Long House / Khosla Associates

The Long House / Khosla Associates

  • 01:00 - 23 August, 2013
The Long House / Khosla Associates
The Long House / Khosla Associates, © Shamanth Patil J
© Shamanth Patil J

© Shamanth Patil J © Shamanth Patil J © Shamanth Patil J © Shamanth Patil J + 23

  • Architects

  • Location

    Bangalore, India
  • Principal Designers

    Sandeep Khosla and Amaresh Anand
  • Design Team

    Sandeep Khosla, Amaresh Anand, Raju S. and Akanksha Chhajer
  • Civil Contractors

    J.J. Constructions Pvt. Ltd
  • Landscape

    Garden World Pvt. Ltd
  • PHE Consultant

    JR Consultancy
  • Electrical Contractor

    MK Electricals
  • Electrical Consultant

    Services Design Consultants
  • Area

    6000.0 sqm
  • Project Year

    2013
  • Photographs

© Shamanth Patil J
© Shamanth Patil J

From the architect. The program for The Long House was conceived of by Architect Sandeep Khosla and his graphic Designer wife Tania as a luxury home for themselves, with the intention of leasing out to a family of four.

© Shamanth Patil J
© Shamanth Patil J

Situated on a shady green avenue in a gated community complex in Bangalore, the house derives its form from the linearity of the site. The rectilinear 8000 sft site with a 120 ft. long frontage had an existing mature bamboo grove to its northern side that needed to be preserved as well as a row of fruit trees to its south.

© Shamanth Patil J
© Shamanth Patil J

Programmatically there was an intentional demarcation between public vs. private spaces. The ground floor has mostly public spaces such as living, dining, den, study, kitchen, utilities as well as a guest room and the upper floor has 3 private bedrooms and a family room.

© Shamanth Patil J
© Shamanth Patil J

Entry to the house is via a sculpted brick coloured wall. Traversing through a small court one enters the foyer. The first visual is a picture window framing a temple tree set afloat a linear blue water body and against the backdrop of a red wall. A succession of spaces unfolds to the east of the foyer, spatially flowing into one another; a spacious living room leads to a den and then into an intimate study via series of sliding pocket doors. The living spaces in turn flank a lengthy verandah that overlooks the north garden. The extended proportions of the verandah use the west to east axis of the site effectively.

© Shamanth Patil J
© Shamanth Patil J

West of the foyer is a generous sky- lit double height volume gently bathed with natural light via two narrow skylights. The staircase was crafted out of mild steel and timber and floats lightly within its surrounding volume.

© Shamanth Patil J
© Shamanth Patil J

The dining room is located such that it enjoys views of the water feature and garden to its east and the staircase to its south. Flanking the staircase and dining is an imposing double height wall that was crafted in form finished ribbed concrete.

© Shamanth Patil J
© Shamanth Patil J

One of the most exciting interventions of the Long House has been the customization we were able to achieve with the masons and carpenters. Certain vertical planes were cast in ribbed textured concrete. Special care was taken during construction in the repetitive wedge shaped timber shuttering to achieve seamless joints once the concrete was poured.  In the long verandah the same ribbed pattern is reflected as a timber clad ceiling that runs its entire length before folding down vertically in the form of ribbed concrete. The play between timber and cement is also reiterated through the house in other ways. Certain rooms like the den and study have teak veneer clad walls juxtaposed with polished cement rendered ceilings.

© Shamanth Patil J
© Shamanth Patil J

On the first floor, the master bedroom and one of the children's rooms have lofty 15ft high ceilings that break the massing and have sloping cantilevered roofs that open up towards the east. The underside of the roof overhangs are clad with ribbed wood.

© Shamanth Patil J
© Shamanth Patil J

The Long House proposes an exciting dialogue with the public street on its south as well as the private garden to its north. Public spaces like the dining, living, and den open up generously via large sliding glass doors to the verandah and private garden to its north, and the private bedrooms on the first floor open up to views of the verdant green cover of the fruit trees to the south.

© Shamanth Patil J
© Shamanth Patil J

The material usage is minimal. Polished beige marble, grey kota stone, and polished cement are juxtaposed with the warmth of timber frames, and ribbed teak cladding.

© Shamanth Patil J
© Shamanth Patil J

The design seeks to successfully negotiate the linearity of the site and the need to preserve the existing bamboo plantation by creating a lung space on the northeast.  The house keeps constant the need for an unfettered flow of light and air, adequate cross ventilation and views from each of the rooms to the surrounding greenery.

First Floor Plan
First Floor Plan
Cite: "The Long House / Khosla Associates" 23 Aug 2013. ArchDaily. Accessed . <http://www.archdaily.com/418842/the-long-house-khosla-associates/>
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