The G Project: Crowdsourcing a Better World

  • 12 Apr 2013
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  • Architecture News Competitions mini
; G Adventures and The Planeterra Foundation

The G Project, hosted by G Adventures and The Planeterra Foundation, is giving four lucky innovators, inventors, visionaries and designers the opportunity to bring a humanitarian and forward-thinking project to fruition.  The G Project is inviting anyone to submit a design idea of any scale that will have a “positive impact on your planet”.  The idea must be a proposal that falls into one of four categories: freedom, beauty, knowledge or community.  It is a crowd-sourcing exercise that seeks to engage ideas of any variety and asks the global community to contribute to deciding which projects deserve to be realized.  

The ideas have already started coming in and have a wide range of applications and goals.  From educating young girls and women to building wagons out of recyclable materials to help villagers in Swahili transport water for pumps and basins to their homes.  Others include greening rooftops in skyscrapers in major cities or using sewage and organic waste in urban areas for biofuel.

The G Project is asking you to vote on your favorite idea.  The public vote will determine the sixteen finalists – four from each category – which will then be reviewed by a jury panel of renowned humanitarians, including Jane Goodall and Cameron Sinclair, co-founder of Architecture for Humanity.  One idea from each category will be selected to receive funding of $25,000 and will select organizations that will realize the idea.

Submissions are open until June 3rd, so if you have a great idea that you would like to see come true for the betterment of your planet do not hesitate to enter it into the G Project.  Also be sure to cast your votes for your favorite idea.  Voting details and competition timelines are available on the website.  Check it out at http://thisisyourplanet.com 

Cite: Vinnitskaya, Irina. "The G Project: Crowdsourcing a Better World" 12 Apr 2013. ArchDaily. Accessed 18 Apr 2014. <http://www.archdaily.com/?p=359187>

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