CAPACITY: Gensler Los Angeles Academic Studio

  • 03 Apr 2013
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CAPACITY, the Gensler led academic studio at Cal Poly San Luis Obispo, was created with the intent to survey, understand and visualize the dynamic set of infrastructure constraints impacting and contributing to Downtown Los Angeles’ capacity to evolve. The video above highlights the documentation and synthesizing done by the SLO_GenLA ’13 Professional studio which shows the capacity of Los Angeles’ infrastructure and demonstrates how the limits of each system may physically impact the future built form of the city. Once these variables, which include building information and zoning, energy, waste management, and water were universally known and their units of measure understood, scenarios for the future were generated.

Cite: Furuto, Alison. "CAPACITY: Gensler Los Angeles Academic Studio" 03 Apr 2013. ArchDaily. Accessed 17 Sep 2014. <http://www.archdaily.com/?p=350991>

5 comments

  1. Thumb up Thumb down +3

    Ok so this is an exercise in extrusion, with a really poor soundtrack. You make clear what it would take sustain such an extreme population density, but is that really a desirable future? Is ‘evolution’ really just densification? I would prefer to have seen a re-imagining of L.A’s urban fabric, rather than being shown its maximum ‘capacity’.

  2. Thumb up Thumb down +1

    While I hate to rag on these kids, this entire presentation just comes across as uninspired, even sophomoric. The data seems poorly sequenced and awkwardly organized. The video is far too long. The conclusions are naive and disjointed. It doesn’t seem as if the producers have ever had experience compiling or representing data before. And that music!

    Does this really meet Archdaily’s standards?

  3. Thumb up Thumb down +5

    It’ a student project; it may well be their first experience compiling and representing data.

  4. Thumb up Thumb down +1

    I agree the music is lame, but students will be students. I find the material and topic fascinating. The scenarios are shocking and illustrates the disconnection between resources and planning. More cities need to be looking at this.

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