The Squaire / JSK

© Nicolae Sotir

Architects: JSK
Location: Airport, 60547 , Germany
Area: 140000.0 ft2
Year: 2011
Photographs: Nicolae Sotir, Roland Horn, Martin Joppen, Bavaria Luftbild, Leitner, Euroluftbild

Owner: IVG Immobilien AG (98%) and Fraport AG (2%)
Investment Total: around EUR 1bn
Shell And Core Construction: Ed. Züblin AG
Services And Technical Equipment: YIT
Fit Out: ARGE Innenausbau, Lindner AG, Czapla
Façade: Thyssen, BLT

© Bavaria Luftbild

From the architect. HE SQUAIRE at Frankfurt International Airport is an, in many ways, extraordinary building. Its unique architecture has made it a landmark building – characteristic for Airport City Frank- furt.

The joint venture of IVG Immobilien AG and Fraport AG, designed by International Ar- chitects, is located at Europe’s best connected spot – directly above the ICE high speed train station, with direct connection to one of Germany’s most important motorway junctions and with covered access to Terminal 1 of Frankfurt Airport.

© Leitner

On about 140,000 sqm one can find here office space, two Hilton Hotels, a business- and conference centre and an infrastructure tailored to the needs of the people working here – with restaurants, shops, physicians, fitness offers, a daycare centre and various services ranging from hairdresser to drycleaner’s. With this innovative use concept called “NEW WORK CITY” THE SQUAIRE creates a working environment facilitating performance, moti- vation and creativity. 

© Roland Horn

With its NEW WORK CITY concept THE SQUAIRE is based upon trends which are, accord- ing to US economist Richard Florida, changing the world’s economy. People as brain work- ers are becoming – according to Florida – crucial for economic competitiveness and the clus- tering of creative people in cities, regions, and neighbourhoods provides a key spur to inno- vation and competitiveness. Moreover, in the age of globalisation innovation, competitive- ness and higher living standards require a new, higher velocity for moving goods, people and ideas. In this context, airport cities as new mega regions are gaining special importance.

Therefore, the NEW WORK CITY concept focuses on three elements:

© Euroluftbild

People

In the centre of the NEW WORK CITY concept are the up to 7,000 people working in THE SQUAIRE, because employees are the most important success factor for companies in to- day’s knowledge society. THE SQUAIRE creates a working environment facilitating perform- ance, motivation and creativity – thanks to an infrastructure tailored to the daily needs of the people working here with restaurants, shops, physicians, fitness offers, a daycare centre and various services ranging from a concierge up to a hairdresser and drycleaner’s and, finally, with large public areas providing space for encounters and recreation in the spacious atria.

© Roland Horn

Networking

THE SQUAIRE offers various communication areas for different occasions – be it the atria, the restaurants and cafés or the business- and conference centre. This creative environment facilitates business contacts for example with top managers who are always within reach at Frankfurt International Airport: about 150,000 air travellers, 23,000 rail travellers and 300,000 vehicles are passing by every day.

© Martin Joppen

Time efficiency

The infrastructure of THE SQUAIRE facilitates the management of everyday life and thus saves time for the really important things in business and in private life. People working in this “city under one roof”, with the airport at the doorstep, the ICE high speed train in the ga- rage and the most important motorways nearby saves travel time and costs. In addition, the building’s infrastructure and the very good availability of parking space within the building and the adjacent car park with about 3,125 parking spaces altogether save time and are for the benefit of both – employees and companies. 

Cross Section
* Location to be used only as a reference. It could indicate city/country but not exact address.
Cite: "The Squaire / JSK" 12 Mar 2013. ArchDaily. Accessed 18 Apr 2014. <http://www.archdaily.com/?p=342579>

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