Hi-pod / BKK Architects + Peter Elliott Architecture + Urban Design

© Peter Bennetts

Architects: BKK Architects + Peter Elliott Architecture + Urban Design
Location: Footscray, Victoria, Australia
Design Team: Tim Black, Julian Kosloff, Simon Knott, Peter Elliott, George Huon, Scott Woodward, Simon Linardi
Area: 10.4 sqm
Year: 2011
Photographs: Peter Bennetts, Mark Wilson

Builder: Contract Management Systems
Artist: Robert Owen
Structural Engineers: Felicetti Pty Ltd, Brown and Tomkinson Pty Ltd
Services Engineer: Hyder Consulting Pty Ltd
Quantity Surveyor: WT Partnership
Fire Engineering: Exova Warringtonfire Australia
Environmental Sustainability Consultant: Sense Architecture – Natasha Palich

© Peter Bennetts

This project consists of a new facade element inserted into an existing 13 storey, public housing tower in Melbourne’s inner city. Effectively a residential extension, albeit elevated three storey’s above the ground, the project employs standard construction methodologies and relatively small gestures to big effect.

© Mark Wilson

The concept for this project originated in a public competition brief, Tower Turnaround, initiated in 2007 by the Office of Housing in collaboration with the Office of the Victorian Government Architect. This competition was won by and Peter Elliott Architects with the extended project team. The primary goals of the competition were to:

© Mark Wilson

·  Improve the environmental performance of an existing high rise building (one of the many original Housing Commission Towers built throughout inner Melbourne in the 1960s and 70s)
·  Enhance the amenity of the building for occupants, and
·  Improve the external appearance of the tower

© Peter Bennetts

This project represents a pilot or prototype for the aspirations of the original brief. The design approach was to avoid merely cosmetic strategies for improvement in favor of an ‘inside-out’ approach, with primacy given to re-engendering a human scale to the tower and its ‘livability’ for occupants.

© Mark Wilson

The new addition not only articulates the individual tenancy in contrast to the mute repetition of the existing facade, but also creates a more direct link between the unit and its surrounds by opening up the building’s skin. Internally, sill heights, built in shelving and the connection between existing and new elements were carefully curated to consider a range of possibilities for everyday inhabitation.

© Mark Wilson

The environmental performance of the addition was rigorously modeled and tested throughout the design phase. Integrated sun shading, double glazing and insulation were all employed to dramatically improve the thermal performance of the renovated unit. Access to natural light and ventilation were also maximized, affording tenants better control over their living environment.

© Mark Wilson

Critical to the delivery of this project was the development of an installation methodology that enabled existing residents of the tower to remain in occupation during construction. To this end disruptions due to on site activities were minimised in favour of offsite works. The Hi-Pod was conceived as a pre-fabricated, timber framed structure, with cad-cam technology enabling the lightweight structural components to be efficiently cut and assembled offsite. The structure was then clad prior to delivery for installation. Ultimately, the time taken to embed the pod into the facade was less than four hours from pick up at the factory to installation.

Section

View this project in Google Maps

* Location to be used only as a reference. It could indicate city/country but not exact address.
Cite: "Hi-pod / BKK Architects + Peter Elliott Architecture + Urban Design" 07 Feb 2013. ArchDaily. Accessed 23 Apr 2014. <http://www.archdaily.com/?p=329456>

1 comment

Share your thoughts